Advice from the Nobel Laureates for a Life in Science

by Neysan Donnelly


The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings are special for many reasons. Hearing about Nobel Prize-winning research from those who carried it out, the beautiful environs of Lake Constance and the special camaraderie that develops between the participants over the course of the meeting every year: these all contribute to ensuring that young scientists treasure their Lindau experiences so much, but there is a lot more to it. Talks at Lindau are not like those given at other scientific conferences. The young scientists do gain insights into experiments and results, yes, but they are also provided with the information that allows them to put these findings into a wider context. What’s more, they receive personal glimpses into the lives of the Nobel Laureates, encouragement as well as philosophical and practical advice for life on an academic path. What to study? How does one choose a research project? This generosity of spirit on behalf of the Nobel Laureates is part of what makes the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings so special, and even listening to the recordings of these talks it becomes clear that the participants must go back to their labs and experiments stimulated, reenergised and with renewed faith in the scientific enterprise as a whole.

While each laureate has followed a unique path in his or her scientific career, and thus has his or her own specific nuggets of advice to pass on, it is also interesting to observe how many of the same recommendations are offered by different laureates with very diverse backgrounds. Some might seem intuitive, while others are probably a little more surprising. These re-occurring pieces of advice could be grouped into nine broad points.

 

1) Persistence, persistence, persistence

The path to the Nobel Prize is one that is often characterised by setbacks, hardships and difficulties. As two examples, Nobel Laureates John Gurdon and Peter Mansfield were both told that a career in science wasn’t for them. Others, such as Elizabeth Blackburn, had to overcome a lack of confidence in their own abilities, while Eric Betzig, for example, became so disillusioned with science as a whole that he briefly cut his academic career short to become a househusband. Reflecting these challenges, one piece of advice is offered perhaps more than any other by the Nobel Laureates: persist, persevere, stay the course. In an Agora Talk with Martin Chalfie at the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 2018, Elizabeth Blackburn makes it her number one piece of advice to young scientists.

 

Elizabeth Blackburn on the importance of perseverance in research
(00:02:00 - 00:02:26)

 

Persistence and perseverance are also required because of the nature of scientific endeavour itself. The fact is that many experiments are difficult to develop or fail altogether, and persistence is key. In his lecture from 1986, Jerome Karle highlights how important persistence was in his own research.

 

Jerome Karle highlighting the importance of persistence in his own research
(00:07:50 - 00:08:26)

 

 

 

But where should the motivation to persist come from? The hard work and dedication that are required for a successful scientific career must be founded on the correct career decision: a love of science that is not based on any acclaim or even any immediate applications of the scientist’s discoveries.


Jerome Karle emphasising the pure love of science
(00:04:57 - 00:06:45)

 

In his lecture from 1984, Maurice Wilkins quotes the poet Coleridge to emphasise the importance of the love that a scientist feels towards the object of study and explains why he feels it is even more important than curiosity.

 

Maurice Wilkins on the importance of the love that a scientist feels towards the object of study
(00:22:08 - 00:22:47)

 

2) Be interested in everything, focus on what you love most

Having decided on a career in science, how should one decide on what topic to focus on? Many laureates stress how important it is to choose a topic that one finds interesting and following one’s curiosity. Several also point out that there is no formula or algorithm to tell you what you should study. Oliver Smithies even contends that at the beginning of one’s career one should not worry too much about what exactly one studies and about the outcome. Rather, at this stage the path is the goal. Peter Agre, meanwhile, in his Agora Talk at the 68th Lindau Meeting emphasises the importance of following one’s curiosity.

 

Oliver Smithies (2015) - Ideas Come from Many Places

Well, where to begin? I'm not going to tell you what this slide is about. You'd have to come this afternoon, and we can talk about it. But "Where Do Ideas Come From" is the title of my talk, and it's always a question of where to begin. And I think this is a good place to begin because this is one of the joyful times that happens to a Nobel Laureate that somebody decides they would like to remember where you were at school, and I was at school here from age 5 to 11. And they unveiled a plaque here, and some of the kids are there celebrating with me. It's interesting to me because I already knew by the time I left this school at that age that I wanted to be a scientist, but I didn't know the word. The best I could come up with was I wanted to be an inventor, as a result of reading comic strips about inventors. And then I'd like you to see where it was that I lived. I lived in a little village called Copley with a population of only 1,500, and I'm curious, how many of you guys come from a village as small as that? Not very many. But it was a good place to live. The school was about over here, and my home was up here, and there was a rather lovely river there, the River Calder, except for the fact that when I was a kid it was badly polluted, though it no longer is I'm happy to say. If you go down this River Calder, you come to, there's Copley, and here is the River Calder... You come to another town, Elland, and Elland has a population of 15,000, so it's a rather bigger town. And it produced a Nobel Laureate in 1997 in chemistry. If you go upstream from Copley, you come to another town, Todmorden, that also has a population of about 15,000. It produced two Nobel Laureates. So the water? Obviously not. (laughs) The teachers is the answer. The teachers inspire you and give you all sorts of thoughts. And in fact, we can look at the teachers that were involved in all of these persons. And Smithies had a good teacher in elementary school and two teachers in high school. And Walker had a good science teacher. And Cockcroft and Wilkinson both had the same science teacher, so that science teacher was teaching for more than 20 years and produced, as it were, two Nobel Laureates. So if you're a teacher, think how much influence you can have in the future. Maybe you will have the enjoyment of being a teacher and being remembered. Maybe you'll produce a Nobel Laureate, who knows? So be a careful teacher when you're a teacher. I had a grand teacher when I went to college. I went to college in Oxford University, Balliol College. And this is my teacher, "Sandy" Ogston. He was trained in chemistry and then took a second degree in physiology and began to teach students, in the medical curriculum, and I had won my scholarship to the college with physics, but I for some reason that escapes me now, I decided to do medicine. Anyway, "Sandy" Ogston was my teacher. And he produced a Nobel Laureate in 1976 and another one in 2007, so some teachers can really inspire you. The way of teaching at that time in Oxford, and it still is the primary way, is a marvellous way, and I wish we could do it more easily all over the world. But it's an expensive way of teaching. And that is that once a week, you would meet with your teacher, in this case "Sandy" Ogston and present to him or her an essay that you had written over the preceding week on a topic that had been assigned to you. And you were expected to produce something that went back to the original literature. You couldn't work with a textbook, or you might read a textbook, you might read a review, but you were expected to write something original. Might get a topic, "Oh, write me an essay on pain." And that's all you'll be told, and you were expected to produce a learned article in a week. (laughs) Well Sandy set me the topic, "Write me an essay, Oliver, on energy metabolism." Now this was before the tricarboxylic acid cycle had been published, before Krebs' cycle. And I set about this task. And then I came across this. And why would I show you a book? I show you this book because what's in this book was so exciting that I remember where I was when I read it. I remember what the book looked like. I remember what the paper looked like. It was so inspiring to read something that made sense out of what appeared to be nonsense. And the nonsense was: Why doesn't the body just burn glucose and make carbon dioxide? It goes through all these complicated things of adding phosphate and doing this and that and the other. And why does it do it? And this book contains the answer. The answer is this little squiggle here, squiggle P, which means energy-rich phosphate, an energy-rich phosphate bond. And for the chemists, it's interesting that the energy-rich ones are all acid anhydrides, and acid anhydrides are very powerful organic compounds, have much more energy in them, for example, than a phosphate ester would have. And anyway, true to form, I came back with an essay the following week. And in it, I had Smithies' cycle. And it was rather a neat cycle because you could start with an inorganic phosphate and make a phosphate ester, and that's relatively low energy and take away a couple of hydrogens. And you can convert the phosphate ester into an acid anhydride here, and that's energy rich, from which you could make ATP. And then go around here and add the hydrogen back, and you could start over again, and you could produce energy for nothing. Well, I wasn't completely stupid. I did know it was wrong, but I didn't know why it was wrong. And that was an interesting problem. And "Sandy" Ogston proceeded to write an article on it eventually because it turned out that people had forgotten in making the calculations that you had to think about the concentration of things, not just about what was called standard free energies in those days, where every reaction component was at one molar concentration. And he worked out that there had to be a system that produced energy in moving electrons up the electromotive scale, you might say, in the cell. So he foresaw the importance of energy by concentration, and he also realised that the system wouldn't work if the substrates dissociated from their enzymes. They had to be handed over as it were without dissociating into free substrate. Otherwise, the kinetics would be wrong, so it was a good article. And he published it, and he was kind enough to add my name as a scholar of Balliol College, and I felt pretty good about this. And then this was 1948, so it's quite a long time ago. But then somewhere around about, oh let's say, I don't know the exact date, but say 1990 or thereabout somebody came up to me and said, you see 1990 would be And I rather modestly said, "Well as a matter of fact, I am." And he said, "Oh I thought you were dead." (laughs) So anyway, on with the game, and here's my PhD thesis, and you can see a lot of significant figures here. And in fact those are real significant figures. They're not due to not rounding off in a computer, which is the common method of getting many significant figures. But you can see that my experimental points are really rather closely together, and I was measuring osmotic pressure. It's not very important to know what that is, but the points were so close that I had to interrupt the line to put the theoretical line on, so I was very proud of this super precision method. And I published it, "A Dynamic Osmometer for Accurate Measurements," a neat paper. It has a record. Nobody ever quoted it. Nobody ever used the method again, and I never used the method again. So you have to ask yourself, "Well what was the point of it?" And I want you to think a moment. Well the point of it was that I learned to do good science, and I enjoyed it. And those are the critical things in the early stages of your career that you learn to do good work and to enjoy it. It does not matter what you do. It's absolutely unimportant. You do not want to be a clone of your advisor. You do not want to be a clone of your post-doctoral advisor. You want to be yourself, but you can learn from these people how to do good science, but you must be enjoying it. Otherwise, you won't have that fire that's needed. So I urge you, if you aren't doing what you like, go to your advisor and say, "I need another problem. I'm not enjoying it." If your advisor can't do that, change your advisor. I'm serious. It's so important because it's very unlikely, and I hope it is true that you will do work of the same type that you did when you were a graduate student or when you were a postdoc. You may use the skill, but you hope to do something different. And I didn't achieve that in my graduate work or in my postdoc. My postdoc was equally undistinguished, but I went to Toronto to get a job. And there I was given a job by David Scott, and he was an early worker in the field of insulin work because insulin was discovered in Toronto, and he was the first person to crystalize it and make a long-lasting insulin. And he said, "You can work on anything you like as long as it has something to do with insulin." And I thought, There might be a precursor." Well, we now know there is a precursor. But in case you're waiting, I did not discover it, but I tried. And on the way, I had to find a way of looking at insulin, thinking I would find something slightly different in electrophoresis. And in those days, much electrophoresis was done on filter paper, where you would soak a filter paper with buffer, apply the protein, and allow it to migrate, and you can it just unrolled like a smear and really was very poor, and I was rather frustrated. And then I heard of the work of these two gentlemen: Kunkel and Slater, and they'd use a box, a box about this big, this big and so on. And they filled it full of starch grains, rather like a sandbox, except there were grains of starch, and they had buffer around it, and they applied the sample in the starch. And the advantage was that unlike the filter paper... This is from their paper... Here's a protein applied on filter paper, and it smeared, just as my insulin smeared. But when they put it on the starch grain, it came out as a nice peak. But in order to find the protein, you had to cut it up into 40 slices and do a protein determination on every slice, so you had to do 40 protein determinations for one electrophoresis run. I didn't even have a dishwasher in my lab, didn't have a technician. I couldn't do that. But I remembered helping my mother do the laundry, well I was there anyway. She took starch powder and cooked it up with hot water and made a slimy mix, which was used to apply to collars of my father's shirts, which needed to be stiff, and so it was ironed. And when you tied it up at the end of the day, the starch, it set into a jelly. And I thought, "Well my gosh, if I go back and make a starch gel out of the starch, cook it up, and then I can stain it, and I will get rid of all of that problem of 40 slices." Saturday morning was when I had that. And by the afternoon, I'd started my first experiment with it. There is a slot, and there is the insulin as a nice band and made the remark, And that was the beginning of gel electrophoresis. It went on because some time later just for a rough test, I put plasma or serum onto it, and I could see the bands that were known of the proteins that were known to be present in blood at that time. People thought there were five proteins: albumin, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, and gamma globulin. We now know there are about 700 or something like that. But anyway at that time, people thought five, and I got these bands and set it up again, oh 12 midnight. And I could work at any time. And excuse me, and then a little bit later, I managed to see this sort of a pattern with many bands, and I had too many bands to label. In fact, I could find 11 all together, and here's when if you have a good boss, you can really make a step forward because I went to Scottie, as by then he and I called each other Scottie and Oliver. I went to Scottie and said, "Scottie, I've really found something very interesting. I'd like to stop working on insulin and work on this problem." And he said, he was a good scientist, "By all means, change", and that I hope you have that experience. You see I was long past my postdoc when it happened to me... That you get a time when you see you found something that you ought to do that's different from what has happened in the past. And I was ready to publish my work, and these are two of my friends. I got tired of bleeding myself and so I got blood from my friends. And I mean that's what they're for, isn't it? And that's George Connell and Gordon Dixon, and why aren't there photographs? My lab didn't own a camera. It was such a poor lab at that time. But I was about ready to get ready to publish and getting photographs made. And then just by chance, I ran another sample from BW, and it was very strange, many extra bands. And so what was funny about BW? It was a woman. This is the first time that I'd run a sample from a woman. I thought I found a new method of telling men from women. And I called one pattern the M pattern and the other pattern the F pattern: M for male, F for female. And I could do two samples in a day for about a week or so, male and female always fit right. And then the sixth time, they were changed. And the man had changed into a woman. We gave him a real hard time. Come on Casey. Let's have look. But anyway, such is youth you might say. But here is my data file. Just remarkable, but it turned out the difference between the types had nothing to do with gender. It had nothing to do with the existing blood groups, and it was obviously something new. And I show this for another reason. It's a data file that's now, well what, almost 60 years old. You won't be able to produce your data file 60 years from now if you don't make a hard copy. You got to make hard copies of the important data that you have. Don't rely on your computer because you can't read a floppy disc now, and there was a time when that was what we had. You won't be able to read a CD in 10 years from now, for sure. Make some hard copies and keep good hard copies. Well those differences that were here turned out to be genetic. And just to close this story, it was a rather complicated genetic difference, and we worked it out with the help of Norma Ford-Walker, who was a marvellous geneticist and taught me genetics. And then as things moved on, we changed from not being able to do protein sequencing to be able to protein sequence, isolating genes, sequencing gene, and it began to become clear that there was something that one might do about this. For example, Linus Pauling and Harvey Itano and Vernon Ingram showed that the sickle cell mutation was just due to a change of glutamic acid to a valine in the globin molecule. And I began to think it ought to be possible to correct the gene by gene targeting. We now are at a stage where we had cloned DNA, a normal DNA. And I thought if I introduce a piece of normal DNA, I might be able to get some crossing over, so SA lining up with SA and GE and change the bad gene into the good gene by crossing over. I knew it was possible in yeast, and Jack is here today... I don't know whether he's here in the audience now, but Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver had shown that in yeast you could target a gene, and I was teaching, so I had taught this. But the yeast genome is about, well what, two orders of magnitude smaller than the human genome. And so whether it could be done in a human was not at all clear. And then again in teaching "Where do ideas come from?" When you teach, you have to understand. And in order to understand, you sometimes have to spend a long time reading a paper before you can understand it well enough to teach it. And this was a paper that came out April 1st in 1982, and they talked about a method of rescuing a gene, and I can't go into the details, except to say, because of time, that it involved finding a piece of blue DNA, you might say, next to red DNA. The red DNA was what they wanted to isolate, and the blue DNA was what they used to find it. And I thought that I could use this method for gene targeting tests. So here's, only three weeks after that paper came out, an assay for gene placement. And my idea was to use their blue DNA, which you could score in bacteria and try to target the beta globin gene and look for this fragment. I should say: this is incoming DNA, this is the target. If I could find a piece of DNA where these two were together, I would've proved that targeting had occurred because this was not on the incoming DNA, and this was not on the target. And with quite a lot of work, we got further down and got to the stage of simplifying it and used a rather simpler plasmid, which looks very like the one that Terry Orr-Weaver had used, and you could see that if you hit the gene, this is a restriction enzyme map that in the right way, you could isolate a fragment of DNA that would be 11 kilobases if you didn't hit the gene. If you hit the gene, then the size would be eight kilobases. And a long set of experiments led to the final day, when on a Saturday when I developed a film of testing different colonies, and there is the one where the fragment is now a seven, eight kilobases long instead of larger, so this proved that gene targeting was possible. And once you've proved something is possible, then you can go and use it, and other people will start to do it. But the frequency was hopelessly low and not practical for the original purpose, which was to try to help a person with sickle cell anaemia. So what to do? Talk to somebody else, and I went and read about Martin Evans' work, which was using an embryonic stem cell. Here is a blastocyst. That's the part of the blastocyst that will give rise to the embryo. And what Martin Evans and his students learned how to culture those in culture, so that he had these cells growing in culture from a cream-coloured mouse. And if you put these cream-coloured stem cells back into a blastocyst, they would remember where they came from, and you could generate a mouse from this blastocyst by putting it back into a pseudopregnant female, and you would get chimeric mice, mixtures. And from them, you could breed out the gene that you were interested in. So that was an obvious thing. Let's use this method to alter gene. But the assay was terrible. And so we had to have help from a chemist, and we got help from Kary Mullis, who got the Nobel Prize for inventing polymerase chain reaction. And here is a little place in one of my notebooks, saying that we could use this method to detect the recombinant. And I made an apparatus to do it. This is my apparatus. Why would you make an apparatus? Well the reason was there wasn't one available. You could not get an apparatus for doing PCR. But I think this ought to have this label on it because that's what my graduate student friends used to put on an apparatus that was lying somewhere on the floor. And it stands for NBGBOKFO, no bloody good, but okay for Oliver because I would always make stuff out of junk, you see, and so these are all junk things. None of them were new, and yet that's the apparatus which we used and helped me towards the Nobel Prize. The method was good, and here's a super article about it, and you notice I'm not an author. I'm happy to say the author is down there. She's my wife, and she went and made a marvellous animal that could get atherosclerosis. Well, so where to? Well, I'm showing you this one more thing because I have one little more topic to talk about. Here's "Sandy" Ogston again, but there's a little difference now because I've got the date of his death. Because he asked, "When I die, Oliver, I'd like you to write my scientific memoirs." That was something that the Royal Society liked to have. And then you have to read all of his papers. And I read all his of his papers. And then he had this beautiful, little formula here, talking about the available space in a gel to molecules of radius big R when the gel is composed of fibres of radius little r, and there are n fibres per square centimetre. He was talking about a cross section of the gel. And this equation is beautifully precise. It worked in every gel you ever heard of and has been tested inordinately. These two guys in my lab, and they made this diagram to illustrate it, and I like it. If you have a small solute, it can find lots of space in a gel. But if you have a large solute, it can only find a limited space. And so I thought this might apply to the kidney, and I wrote a paper on this that the idea being that here the small molecules would come through the kidney easily. And big molecules, if they had to pass through a gel, would come rather low concentration, and I published a diagram illustrating the principle. This is a cross section of a kidney at electron microscope dimension. And these are the sizes of albumin molecules drawn to scale, and this is the gel in the kidney through which I thought the thing might happen. And so I went to our local person who was an expert in making a gold nanoparticle, which I wanted to use, to see in the electron microscope. And he said, I'm not going to make them for you, Oliver. You make your own. He said, "You'll learn more if you make them." I got hooked. They're marvellous, interesting things, and I spent a large amount of my personal time on them. I'll just show you one example here. That's what, four years ago. And this was the time when I first learned... Was still working at the weekend. This is the time when I found out that I could control the size of the molecule by varying the time of a reaction step in the procedure. I got a paper out of it in Langmuir, and I'm the first author. And I'm the first author because I did the work, not because I wrote the paper, though I did, but because the experiments were mine, most of them. And so, think about it. It's really rather neat to have a first author paper when you're 89 and especially if this is the first paper I ever published in a chemistry journal. But I have one more... Oh there's an example of working of it. Here is plasma with the large molecules in clusters, and they can't get into the basement membrane. It's more complicated than that, but that's an example. I've one last, a little thing to show you, and that's this. And what am I showing an aeroplane for? Wel,l partly because that's been a part of my life, but this is my instructor, Field Morey. And he taught me to fly, and I was a nervous flyer. And when I learned to fly with him, instructor sits here, and the pupil sit in the left seat. And sweat used to pour off me, I mean literally. And so one day I turned to him and said, "That was a good day for you. Only one drop dripped." That gives you some idea. Well, I later on learned to be an instructor, and I had a pupil, Jeff Bloch. And when we went flying together, I was teaching him to glide, he would come back absolutely sodden. His back would be completely sticking to himself. He went by himself when the time came, and he came back, and he said, "Look Oliver, dry." That's a very important lesson, not just for flying. It tells you that you can overcome fear with knowledge. If you're nervous about doing something new in science, you might say, "This guy over here, he's much smarter than me. Or this lady, she knows what to do. I couldn't possibly do that." You're frightened. Go and learn. Go and read. You can do anything. You can change fields. You don't have to be stuck somewhere. Go away and overcome fear with knowledge. That's my motor glider, and here's my companion. And if you're lucky, you will have a companion as I have in Nobuyo, and that's where I stop. applause

Gut, wo fangen wir an? Ich werde Ihnen jetzt nicht erzählen, worum es sich bei dieser Folie handelt. Sie müssen heute Nachmittag kommen und wir können darüber reden. Aber der Titel meiner Rede lautet “Wo die Ideen herkommen” und es ist immer eine Frage, wo man anfängt. Und ich glaube, dies ist ein guter Platz, um zu beginnen, weil dies einer der erfreulichen Momente für einen Nobelpreisträger ist, wenn jemand wissen will, wo Sie in der Schule waren, und ich war hier in der Schule im Alter von 5 bis 11 Jahren. Und Sie enthüllten hier eine Tafel, ein Paar Kinder feiern hier mit mir. Es ist interessant für mich, weil ich schon in der Zeit, in der ich diese Schule an diesem Alter verließ, wusste, dass ich ein Wissenschaftler sein möchte, aber ich kannte das Wort nicht. Das Beste, was ich zur Sprache bringen konnte, war, dass ich ein Erfinder sein wollte. Dies war ein Ergebnis davon, dass ich Comics über Erfinder gelesen habe. Und dann möchte ich gerne, dass Sie sehen, wo ich aufgewachsen bin. Ich lebte in einem kleinen Ort namens Copley mit einer Einwohnerzahl von nur 1,500, und ich bin neugierig, wie viele von Ihnen aus einem so kleinen Ort kommen. Nicht sehr viele. Aber es war gut, an diesem Ort zu leben. Die Schule war etwa hier und mein Zuhause etwa hier und es gab dort einen schönen Fluss, den River Calder. Von der Tatsache abgesehen, dass er, als ich ein Kind war, schlimm verschmutzt gewesen ist, aber dies ist nicht mehr so und ich freue mich, dies zu sagen. Wenn Sie den River Calder abwärts gehen kommen Sie zu, hier ist Copley und hier ist der River Calder ... Sie kommen zu einer anderen Stadt, Elland, und Elland hat eine Einwohnerzahl von 15.000, ist also eine etwas größere Stadt. Und sie brachte im Jahr 1997 einen Nobelpreis in Chemie hervor. Wenn Sie von Copley stromaufwärts gehen, dann kommen Sie zu einer anderen Stadt, Todmorden, die ebenfalls eine Einwohnerzahl von ungefähr 15.000 hat. Und sie brachte zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Also ist es das Wasser? Offensichtlich nicht. (Gelächter). Die Antwort lautet: die Lehrer. Die Lehrer inspirieren Sie und ermuntern Sie zu denken. Und tatsächlich können wir uns die Lehrer betrachten, die mit all diesen Personen zu tun hatten. Und Smithies hatte einen guten Lehrer in der Grundschule und zwei Lehrer im Gymnasium. Und Walker hatte einen guten Lehrer für Wissenschaften. Und Cockcroft und Wilkinson hatten beide denselben Lehrer für Wissenschaften, dieser Lehrer für Wissenschaften unterrichtete also mehr als 20 Jahre lang und brachte sozusagen zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Wenn Sie also Lehrer sind, dann denken Sie daran, wieviel Einfluss Sie in der Zukunft haben können. Vielleicht werden Sie das Vergnügen haben, ein Lehrer zu sein und nicht vergessen zu werden. Vielleicht bringen Sie einen Nobelpreisträger hervor, wer weiß? Seien Sie also ein sorgfältiger Lehrer, wenn Sie Lehrer sind. Ich hatte einen großartigen Lehrer, als ich zur Universität ging. Ich ging in das Balliol College der Universität von Oxford. Und dies ist mein Lehrer, “Sandy” Ogston. Er war in Chemie ausgebildet und machte einen zweiten Hochschulabschluss in Physik und fing an, Studenten im medizinischen Fachbereich zu unterrichten und ich habe das Stipendium für die Hochschule mit Physik erhalten, aber aus einem Grund, der mir im Moment nicht einfällt, habe ich mich für die Medizin entschieden. Jedenfalls war Sandy Ogston mein Lehrer. Und er brachte einen Nobelpreis im Jahr 1976 und einen weiteren im Jahr 2007 hervor, manche Lehrer können Sie also wirklich inspirieren. Die Art und Weise, in der damals in Oxford unterrichtet wurde, und dies wird hauptsächlich noch so gemacht, ist wunderbar. Ich wünsche mir, wir könnten es überall auf der Welt so machen. Aber es ist eine teure Art des Unterrichts. Und es war einmal in der Woche, dass Sie Ihren Lehrer treffen konnten, in diesem Fall Sandy Ogston, und ihm oder ihr einen Essay vorlegen, den Sie in der vergangenen Woche über ein Ihnen zugeteiltes Thema geschrieben haben. Und es wurde von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas erstellen, was zu der ursprünglichen Literatur zurückgeht. Sie können nicht mit einem Lehrbuch arbeiten, oder Sie lesen vielleicht ein Lehrbuch oder eine Besprechung - aber es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas Neues schreiben. Sie erhalten vielleicht ein Thema “Schreiben Sie einen Aufsatz über Brot.” Und das ist alles, was man Ihnen sagt, und es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie einen tiefgründigen Artikel innerhalb einer Woche erstellen. (lacht) Sandy hat mir folgendes Thema zugeteilt: "Oliver, schreib mir einen Essay über Energie-Metabolismus”. Dies war jetzt vor der Veröffentlichung des Zyklus über Trikarbonsäurezyklus, vor dem Zyklus von Krebs. Und ich machte mich an die Arbeit. Und dann kam mir dies in die Quere. Und warum sollte ich Ihnen ein Buch zeigen? Ich zeige Ihnen dieses Buch, denn was in diesem Buch stand war so aufregend, dass ich mich daran erinnere, wo ich war, als ich es las. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Buch aussah. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Papier aussah. Es war so inspirierend, etwas zu lesen, was Sinn machte aus etwas, was Unsinn zu sein schien. Und der Unsinn war: Warum verbrennt der Körper nicht einfach Glukose und macht Kohlendioxid? Es ging durch all diese komplizierten Dinge durch das Hinzufügen von Phosphat und indem man dies und jenes tut. Und warum funktioniert es? Und dieses Buch enthält die Antwort. Die Antwort ist dieser kleine Schnörkel hier, P-Schnörkel, der energiereiches Phosphat bedeutet, eine energiereiche Phosphatverbindung. Und für die Chemiker ist es interessant, dass die energiereichen Verbindungen alle saure Anhydride sind. Und saure Anhydride sind sehr mächtige organische Stoffe, die sehr viel mehr Energie in sich bergen als es zum Beispiel die Phosphat-Ester haben würden. Und ganz vorbildlich erschien ich in der folgenden Woche mit einem Essay. Und darin stand der Zyklus von Smithies. Es war ein ziemlich smarter Zyklus, weil er mit einem anorganischen Phosphat begann und einen Phosphat-Ester bildete, welches eine relativ geringe Energie hatte. Und man nimmt ein Paar Wasserstoffe weg, und Sie können hier den Phosphat-Ester in ein saures Anhydrid umwandeln, und dies ist energiereich, daraus können Sie ATP machen. Und dann gehen Sie hier herum und fügen das Hydrogen hinten hinzu, und Sie können wieder von vorne anfangen und Sie könnten Energie aus nichts herstellen. Nun war ich nicht völlig dumm. Ich wusste, es war falsch, aber ich wusste nicht, warum es falsch war. Und dies war ein interessantes Problem. Und Sandy Ogston schrieb einen Artikel darüber, weil Menschen bei den Berechnungen vergessen haben, dass man an die Konzentration denken muss und nicht nur an was damals die standardmäßige freie Energie genannt wurde, bei der jede Komponente der Reaktion auf einer molaren Konzentration beruhte. Und er arbeitete heraus, dass es ein System geben musste, dass Energie schuf, indem sich Elektronen aufwärts in der elektromotorischen Skala bewegten, sozusagen in der Zelle. Und er sah die Wichtigkeit der Energie durch Konzentration voraus. Und er wurde sich klar darüber, dass das System nicht mit Substraten arbeiten könnte, die von ihren Enzymen getrennt sind. Und sie mussten übergeben werden ohne sich in freie Substrate zu zerlegen. Andernfalls hätten die Kinetiker sich geirrt, es war also ein guter Artikel. Und er veröffentlichte ihn und er war nett genug, meinen Namen als Schüler des Balliol College hinzuzufügen, und ich fühlte mich sehr gut dabei. Dies geschah im Jahr 1948, ist also schon eine ganze Weile her. Aber dann etwa um, sagen wir mal... das genaue Datum weiß ich nicht... aber sagen wir mal im Jahr 1990 etwa kam jemand auf mich zu und sagte, Und ich erwiderte ziemlich bescheiden: “Das stimmt schon, das bin ich”. Und er sagte; „Oh, ich dachte, Sie wären tot.“ (lacht) Und jedenfalls geht das Spiel weiter und hier ist meine Doktorarbeit und Sie können hier eine Menge bedeutender Zahlen sehen. Tatsächlich waren es sehr bedeutende Zahlen. Sie sind es nicht bedingt dadurch, dass sie in einem Computer abgerundet wurden, was eine gängige Methode ist, um viele signifikanten Werte zu erhalten. Aber Sie können sehen, dass meine experimentellen Punkte ziemlich gedrängt aneinander liegen und ich maß osmotischen Druck. Es ist nicht sehr wichtig zu wissen, was das ist, aber die Punkte waren so gedrängt, dass ich die Linie unterbrechen musste, um die theoretische Linie darauf zu setzen, und ich war auf diese sehr präzise Methode sehr stolz. Ich veröffentlichte es als “Ein dynamisches Osmometer für genaue Messungen”, ein ordentliches Papier. Es verzeichnete einen Rekord. Niemand hat es jemals zitiert. Niemand hat diese Methode wieder verwendet und auch ich habe diese Methode nie wieder verwendet. Sie müssen sich also fragen “Nun, worum geht es hier?” Und ich möchte, dass Sie einen Augenblick nachdenken. Nun, es geht hier darum, dass ich lernte, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben und ich genoss es. Und dies sind die kritischen Dinge in den frühen Stadien Ihrer Karriere, dass Sie lernen, gute Arbeit zu leisten und das gerne zu tun. Es ist nicht wichtig, was Sie tun. Das ist absolut unwichtig. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres wissenschaftlichen Mentors sein. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres Doktorvaters sein. Sie möchten Sie selbst sein, aber Sie können von diesen Leuten lernen, wie Sie gute Wissenschaft betreiben aber Sie müssen es genießen. Andernfalls werden Sie nicht die Leidenschaft haben, die Sie brauchen. Ich bitte Sie also dringend, wenn Sie nicht das tun, was Sie möchten, dann gehen Sie zu Ihrem Berater und sagen „Ich brauche ein anderes Thema, ich genieße es nicht.“ Wenn der Berater es nicht tun kann, dann wechseln Sie den Berater. Ich meine es ernst. Es ist so wichtig, weil es unwahrscheinlich ist und ich hoffe, dass Sie die Arbeit derselben Art tun werden, die Sie gemacht haben als Sie ein graduierter Student waren oder nach der Doktorarbeit. Sie benutzen vielleicht die Fertigkeit aber Sie hoffen, etwas anderes zu tun. Und ich habe dies in meiner Diplomarbeit oder nach der Doktorarbeit nicht geschafft. Meine Zeit nach der Doktorarbeit war nichts Ungewöhnliches, aber ich ging nach Toronto, um einen Job anzunehmen. Und dort erhielt ich einen Job durch David Scott und er hat frühzeitig auf dem Gebiet des Insulins gearbeitet, weil das Insulin in Toronto entdeckt wurde, und er war der Erste, der es herauskristallisierte und dauerhaftes Insulin herstellte. Und er sagte” “Sie können über alles forschen, solange es etwas mit Insulin zu tun hat." Und ich dachte Es hat wohl einen Vorläufer geben.” Wir wissen nun, dass es einen Vorläufer gibt. Aber falls Sie es erwarten: ich habe es nicht entdeckt - aber ich versuchte es. Und dabei musste ich einen Weg finden, auf Insulin zu schauen, ich dachte, ich würde etwas Neues mittels Elektrophorese finden. Und damals wurden viele Elektrophoresen auf Filterpapier durchgeführt, wo Sie ein Filterpapier mit Pufferlösung einweichen, das Protein dazugeben und ihm erlauben zu wandern und Sie sehen es verschmiert. Dies war wirklich kein gutes Ergebnis und ich war ziemlich frustriert. Und dann hörte ich von der Arbeit dieser beiden Herren: Kunkel und Slater und Sie hatten einen Kasten verwendet, einen Kasten dieser Größe, dieser Größe und so weiter. Und sie füllten ihn mit Stärke, etwa so wie einen Sandkasten, nur war es Stärke, und sie hatten Puffer darin und sie gaben die Prüfsubstanz in die Stärke. Und der Vorteil war, dass anders als beim Filterpapier ... Dies ist von ihrem Papier … Hier ist ein auf das Filterpapier aufgebrachte Protein und es verschmierte, genau wie mein Insulin verschmierte. Aber wenn Sie es wieder auf die Stärke geben taucht es wie ein deutlicher Zacken wieder auf. Aber um das Protein zu finden müssen Sie es in 40 Scheiben schneiden und auf jeder Scheibe eine Proteinermittlung durchführen und Sie müssen für einen Elektrophorese-Durchgang 40 Proteinermittlungen durchführen. Ich hatte in meinem Labor keine Spülmaschine, ich hatte keinen Techniker. Ich konnte dies nicht machen. Aber ich erinnere mich, meiner Mutter beim Wäschemachen geholfen zu haben; ich war zumindest anwesend... Sie nahm Pulver aus Stärke und kochte es mit heißem Wasser auf und machte eine schleimige Mischung, die für die Hemdenkragen meines Vaters angewendet wurde, die steif sein mussten, und so wurden sie gebügelt. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit wurde aus der Stärke ein Gallert. Und ich dachte “Ach du meine Güte, wenn ich ein Stärkegel aus der Stärke mache, es aufkoche, und es dann färben kann, dann werde ich dieses Problem der 40 Scheiben los.” Und am Samstagvormittag war ich damit durch. Und am Nachmittag begann ich mein erstes Experiment damit. Da gibt es einen Schnitt, und da ist das Insulin als ein nettes Band und ich machte den Vermerk Und dies war der Anfang der Elektrophorese mit Gel. Und als ich etwas später nur für einen groben Test fortfuhr hatte ich Plasma oder Serum darauf getan, und ich konnte die Bänder der Proteine sehen, die im Blut enthalten sind. Die Leute dachten, dass es fünf Proteine gibt: Albumin, Alpha-1, Alpha-2, Beta und Gamma Globulin. Wir wissen heute, dass es etwa 700 von ihnen gibt. Aber die Leute wussten damals von fünf und ich bekam diese Bänder und ich startete das Experiment wieder um Mitternacht... Und ich konnte immer arbeiten. Und, Entschuldigung, und dann ein wenig später organisierte ich es so, dass ich ein Muster in den Bändern erkannte, und ich hatte viele zu beschriftende Bänder. Ich konnte tatsächlich 11 Bänder finden und wenn Sie einen guten Chef haben, können Sie dann eine Schritt nach vorne gehen, denn ich ging zu Scottie, wir nannten uns damals gegenseitig Scottie und Oliver, ich ging zu Scottie und sagte zu ihm: “Scottie, ich habe wirklich etwas sehr Interessantes gefunden. Ich möchte gerne mit der Arbeit am Insulin aufhören und an diesem Problem arbeiten.” Und er sagte, er war ein guter Wissenschaftler “Mach auf alle Fälle den Wechsel” und ich hoffe, dass Sie diese Möglichkeit auch haben. Sehen Sie, als mir das widerfuhr, war meine Doktorarbeit lange her … Es gibt den einen Augenblick und Sie erkennen, dass Sie etwas gefunden haben, das Sie dazu führen sollte etwas ganz Neues zu tun. Und ich war soweit, meine Arbeit zu veröffentlichen und dies waren zwei meiner Freunde. Ich hatte genug davon, selbst zu bluten, und so bekam ich Blut von meinen Freunden. Und ich denke, dafür sind sie da, oder nicht? Und dies sind George Connell und Gordon Dixon, und warum gibt es keine Fotos? Mein Labor hatte keine Kamera. Es war damals ein so karges Labor. Aber ich war bereit zu veröffentlichen und Fotos machen zu lassen. Und dann führte ich zufälligerweise ein Experiment mit Beth Wades Blutprobe durch und seltsamerweise gab es viele zusätzliche Bänder. Und was war an Beth Wades Blut anders? Es handelte sich um eine Frau. Es war das erste Mal, dass ich eine Probe einer Frau untersuchte. Ich dachte, ich habe eine neue Methode gefunden, um Männer von Frauen zu unterscheiden. Und ich nannte ein Muster das M-Muster und das andere das W-Muster: M für männlich, W für weiblich. Und ich konnte etwa eine Woche lang etwa zwei Proben täglich untersuchen, männlich und weiblich passten immer gut zusammen. Und dann beim sechsten Mal war alles ganz anders. Und der Mann änderte sich in eine Frau. Wir machten es ihm nicht leicht. Komm schon, Casey, schau dir das an. Aber Sie sagen vielleicht, so ist die Jugend. Aber hier ist mein Datenblatt. Ganz bemerkenswert, aber es zeigte sich, dass der Unterschied zwischen den Typen mit dem Geschlecht nichts zu tun hat. Es hatte mit den existierenden Blutgruppen nichts zu tun und es war offenbar etwas Neues. Und ich zeige dies aus einem anderen Grund. Es ist ein Datenblatt, das jetzt fast 60 Jahre alt ist. Sie können Ihr Datenblatt nicht 60 Jahre verfügbar halten, wenn sie keinen Ausdruck machen. Sie müssen Ausdrucke machen von den wichtigen Daten, die Sie haben. Verlassen Sie sich nicht auf Ihren Computer, weil Sie einen Floppy jetzt nicht lesen können, und es gab einen Moment, da hatten wir genau das. Sie werden ganz bestimmt eine CD-ROM in 10 Jahren nicht lesen können. Machen Sie einige Ausdrucke und bewahren Sie gute Ausdrucke auf. Diese Unterschiede, die es hier gab, stellten sich als genetisch bedingt heraus. Und, nur um die Geschichte zu beenden, es war ein ziemlich komplizierter genetischer Unterschied und wir arbeiten daran mit Hilfe von Norma Ford-Walker, die eine hervorragende Genetikerin war und mir Genetik unterrichtet hatte. Und dann, weil die Dinge sich weiterentwickelten, vorher konnten wir keine Protein-Sequenzierung durchführen, jetzt konnten wir Proteine sequenzieren, Gene isolieren, Gene sequenzieren, und es wurde klar, dass es da etwas gab, was man damit tun könnte. Linus Pauling und Harvey Itano und Vernon zum Beispiel zeigten, dass die Sichelzellmutation aus einer Umwandlung der Glutaminsäure in ein Valin im Globinmolekül herrührte. Und ich begann zu glauben, dass es möglich sein sollte, das Gen durch Gentargeting zu korrigieren. Wir sind nun in dem Stadium, in dem wir eine geklonte DNA, eine normale DNA hatten. Und ich dachte, wenn ich einen Teil einer normalen DNA einführe, könnte ich eine Art Genaustausch bekommen, das SA und GE aneinanderzureihen und das schlechte Gen in ein gutes Gen durch Genaustausch umzuwandeln. Ich wusste, dass es in der Hefe möglich ist und Jack war heute hier … Ich weiß nicht, ob er heute unter den Zuhörern ist, Aber Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver zeigten, dass Sie in der Hefe ein Gen modifizieren konnten, und ich habe gelehrt und dass dann so auch unterrichten. Aber das Hefe-Genom ist ungefähr zwei Größenordnungen kleiner als das menschliche Genom. Und es war daher nicht klar, ob es in einem Menschen durchgeführt werden konnte. Und dann wieder, wenn man über “Woher kommen Ideen” spricht... Sie müssen verstehen, wenn Sie unterrichten. Und um zu verstehen, müssen Sie manchmal viel Zeit damit verbringen, ein Papier zu lesen, bevor sie es gut genug verstehen, um es zu unterrichten. Und dies war ein Papier, dass am 1. April 1982 veröffentlicht wurde, und sie sprachen über eine Methode, ein Gen zu befreien, und, ich kann aus Zeitgründen nicht ins Detail gehen, abgesehen davon, dass es das Auffinden eines Teiles blauer DNA beinhaltete, die sozusagen der roten DNA am nächsten ist. Die rote DNA war das, was sie isolieren wollten, und es war die blaue DNA, die sie gewöhnlich fanden. Und ich dachte, dass ich diese Methode für Tests des Genaustausches verwenden kann. Daher gibt es nur drei Wochen, nachdem dieses Papier veröffentlicht wurde, eine Probe für die Gen-Platzierung. Und meine Idee war, daraus die blaue DNA zu verwenden, die in Bakterien zu finden war, und zu versuchen, auf das Beta Globin-Gen abzuzielen und dieses Fragment zu suchen. Ich sollte sagen: dies ist hereinkommende DNA, dies ist das Zielobjekt. Wenn ich ein DNA finden könnte, wo diese beide kombiniert sind, würde ich bewiesen haben, dass die Modifizierung erfolgt ist, da dies nicht auf der hereinkommenden DNA geschehen ist und nicht auf dem Ziel. Und mit einer Menge Arbeit gehen wir tiefer und kommen zur Stufe, auf der wir es vereinfachen, und wir haben eine eher einfaches Plasmid verwendet, das sehr ähnlich aussieht wie das von Terry Orr-Weaver benutzte, und Sie können sehen, dass, wenn Sie das Gen treffen, dies ist eine Abbildung der Enzymbegrenzung, dass Sie ein DNA-Fragment isolieren können, das 11 Kilobasen sein würde, wenn Sie nicht auf das Gen treffen würden. Wenn Sie auf das Gen treffen dann würde die Größe acht Kilobasen sein. Und eine lange Reihe von Experimenten führt zu dem Tag schließlich, als ich an einem Samstag einen Film mit Tests verschiedener Kolonien entwickelte, und es gab einen, wo das Fragment jetzt eine Länge von sieben, acht Kilobasen hat statt mehr, so wurde bewiesen, dass Gentargeting möglich war. Und sobald Sie bewiesen haben, dass dies möglich ist, können Sie es verwenden und andere Leute werden beginnen, es zu verwenden. Aber die Frequenz war hoffnungslos niedrig und für den ursprünglichen Zweck nicht praktisch, der darin bestand, einer Person mit Sichelzellanämie zu helfen. Also was tun? Mit jemand anderem sprechen und ich las über das Werk von Martin Evans, der eine Embryo-Stammzelle verwendet hat. Hier ist eine Blastocyste. Dies ist der Teil der Blastocyste, aus dem der Embryo entsteht. Und Martin Evans und seine Studenten zeigten wie diese zu kultivieren sind, um auf diese Weise diese Zellen einer cremefarbigen Maus zu kultivieren. Und wenn er diese cremefarbigen Stammzelle in eine Blastocyste einfügen, würden sie sich daran erinnern, woher sie kommen, und Sie können aus dieser Blastocyste eine Maus erschaffen, indem sie sie in eine weibliche Maus einsetzen, und Sie würden chimärische Mäuse erhalten, Mischungen. Und von ihnen können Sie das Gen züchten, an dem Sie interessiert sind. Und dies war etwas Offensichtliches. Lasst uns eine Methode verwenden, um Gene zu verändern. Aber die Probe war furchtbar. Und so brauchten wir Hilfe von einem Chemiker und wir bekamen Hilfe von Kary Mullis, der den Nobelpreis für die Erfindung der Polymerase-Kettenreaktion erhielt. Und hier ist eine kleine Stelle in einem meiner Notizbücher, die besagt, dass Sie diese Methode verwenden können, um die rekombinante Passage zu lokalisieren. Und ich baute den Apparat, um dies zu tun. Dies ist mein Apparat. Warum würden Sie einen Apparat bauen? Nun, der Grund war, dass keiner zur Verfügung stand. Sie können keinen Apparat kaufen, um die Polymerase-Kettenreaktion zu machen. Aber ich glaube dass man dieses Schild anbringen sollte. Meine Kollegen taten es bei dem Apparat, der auf dem Boden lag. Und da steht NBGBOKFO “no bloody good, but okay for Oliver”, weil ich immer Material aus Abfall machen würde, wie Sie sehen, und das alles sind Gegenstände aus dem Abfall. Nichts davon ist neu und dies ist noch der Apparat, den wir benutzten für den Nobelpreis. Die Methode war gut und hier ist ein Superartikel darüber und Sie merken, dass ich nicht der Autor bin. Es freut mich zu sagen, dass die Autorin hier unten steht. Sie ist meine Frau und sie kam und schuf ein aufsehenerregendes Tier, das Atherosklerose bekommen kann. Nun, wohin nun? Ich zeige Ihnen auch diese Sache, weil es noch ein bisschen mehr gibt, worüber man reden kann. Hier ist Sandy Ogston wieder, aber hier gibt es jetzt einen kleinen Unterschied, weil hier auch sein Todesdatum steht. Weil er sagte “Wenn ich sterbe, Oliver, möchte ich gerne, dass Du meine wissenschaftlichen Memoiren schreibst”. Und dies war etwas, was die Royal Society gerne haben wollte. Und dann müssen Sie all diese Papers lesen. Und ich las alles von ihm aus seinen Papers. Und dann hatte er diese schöne kleine Formel hier, die über den verfügbaren Raum in einem Gel in Molekülen von einem Radius R spricht, wenn das Gel aus Fasern des Radius r besteht, und es gibt n Fasern pro Quadratzentimeter. Und er sprach über einen Querschnitt des Gels. Und diese Gleichung ist berückend genau. Sie funktioniert für jedes Gel, von dem Sie je gehört haben und wurde ausgiebig getestet. Diese zwei Herren in meinem Labor machten ein Diagramm, um sie zu veranschaulichen, und ich mochte es. Wenn Sie eine kleine gelöste Substanz haben, kann sie eine Menge Raum in einem Gel vorfinden. Aber wenn Sie eine große gelöste Substanz haben kann es nur einen begrenzten Raum vorfinden. Und ich dachte, dass dies auf die Niere angewendet werden könnte und ich schrieb ein Paper darüber, dass die Idee darin bestünde, dass hier kleine Moleküle leicht durch die Niere gehen würden. Und große Moleküle würden eine ziemlich niedrige Konzentration haben, wenn sie durch ein Gel gehen müssen und ich veröffentlichte ein Diagramm, das das Prinzip veranschaulichte. Dies ist ein Querschnitt einer Niere in EM-Auflösung. Und dies sind die Größen der Albumin-Moleküle, im Maßstab, und dies ist das Gel in der Niere, durch die, wie ich dachte, der Vorgang erfolgen würde. Und ich ging zu unserem Spezialisten für kolloidales Gold, das ich verwenden wollte, um sie in dem Elektronmikroskop zu sehen. Und er sagte, ich werde sie nicht für dich machen, Oliver. Sie machen ihre eigenen. Er sagte “Du wirst mehr lernen, wenn Du sie machst.” Ich war total begeistert. Es gibt wunderbare interessante Dinge und ich verbrachte einen großen Teil meiner Zeit mit ihnen. Ich werde Ihnen hier nur ein Beispiel zeigen. Dies war vor vier Jahren. Und dies war die Zeit, als ich zu lernen begann … Arbeitete immer noch am Wochenende. Das war der Zeit als ich herausfand, dass ich die Größe eines Moleküls kontrollieren konnte, indem ich die Zeitdauer der Reaktion im Verfahren variierte. Ich machte daraus in Langmuir ein Paper und ich bin der erste Autor. Und ich bin der erste Autor, weil ich die Arbeit gemacht habe, nicht weil ich das Paper geschrieben habe, sondern weil die Experimente meine waren, die meisten von ihnen. Denken Sie also darüber nach. Es ist wirklich nett, in einem Paper mit 89 Jahren der Hauptverfasser zu sein, und besonders wenn es das erste Paper ist, dass ich je in einer Chemie-Zeitschrift veröffentlicht habe. Aber ich habe noch etwas … Oh, hier ist ein Beispiel, an dem man arbeiten sollte. Hier ist ein Plasma mit großen Molekülen in Clustern und sie können nicht in die Basalmembran eindringen. Es ist komplizierter als das, aber dies ist ein Beispiel. Ich habe eine letzte kleine Sache, die ich Ihnen zeigen will, und hier ist es. Und warum zeige ich ein Flugzeug dafür? Es ist zum Teil, weil es ein Teil meines Lebens ist, aber dies ist mein Lehrer, Field Morey. Und er brachte mir das Fliegen bei, und ich war ein nervöser Flieger. Als ich lernte mit ihm zu fliegen, hier sitzt der Lehrer und der Schüler sitzt auf dem linkem Sitz. Schweiß strömte mir aus allen Poren, ich meine es wörtlich. Und so wandte ich mich eines Tages an ihn und sagte: „Dies war ein guter Tag für Sie. Nur ein Tropfen ist abgefallen.“ Und das führte mich zu einem Gedanken. Ich habe später gelernt, Lehrer zu sein, und ich hatte einen Schüler, Jeff Bloch. Und als wir zusammen flogen, ich brachte ihm das Gleiten bei, kam er komplett durchnässt zurück. Er klebte richtig an der Rückenlehne. Er flog dann irgendwann selbst und sagte später zu mir “Schau, Oliver, trocken.” Dies ist eine sehr interessante Lektion, nicht nur für das Fliegen. Sie zeigt Ihnen, dass Sie mit Wissen Angst bewältigen können. Wenn Sie nervös dabei sind, wenn Sie etwas Neues in der Wissenschaft machen, dann könnten Sie sagen “Dieser Kerl hier, er ist viel schlauer als ich. Oder diese Dame, sie weiß, was zu tun ist. Ich könnte das möglicherweise nicht tun”. Sie sind ängstlich. Gehen Sie, lernen Sie. Gehen Sie, lesen Sie. Sie können alles. Sie können Felder ändern. Sie müssen nicht irgendwo festgefahren sein. Gehen Sie und überwinden Sie Angst durch Wissen. Dies ist mein Motorgleiter und hier ist mein Freund. Und wenn Sie Glück haben werden Sie einen Freund haben wie ich ihn in Nobuyo habe und an dieser Stelle höre ich auf. Applaus

Oliver Smithies stressing the path as goal in research endeavours
(00:12:25 - 00:13:20)

 

Peter Agre on the importance of following one’s curiosity
(00:17:32 - 00:18:24)

 

 

In their Science webinar from 2015, Dan Shechtman and Elizabeth Blackburn stress how important it is, on the one hand, to have a strong general knowledge of all areas of scientific endeavour, while on the other, to choose one favourite topic and become an expert in it.

 

Dan Shechtman and Elizabeth Blackburn stressing a strong general knowledge of all areas of scientific endeavour
(00:02:39 - 00:03:10)

 

Dan Shechtman's and Elizabeth Blackburn's advice of becoming an expert in a specific research field
(00:03:20 - 00:03:42)

 

3) Keep your eyes open

The history of science and of the Nobel Prize is littered with stories of serendipity. Perhaps the most famous one concerns the discovery of penicillin by Alexander Fleming. Fleming was sorting through some old bacterial plates after a holiday and noticed an unusual pattern on one dish – a mould had grown there, inhibiting the growth of bacteria in its direct vicinity. Fleming had not specifically been looking for fungal antibiotics, but his keen intellect and open mind allowed him to recognise the importance of his discovery. In this spirit, immersion and focus on your favourite topic or subject should not be taken to extremes or lead a scientist to become blinkered. Many laureates advise young scientists to keep an open mind, talk to people from different fields and to carry out multidisciplinary research. They also encourage young researchers to be open to and seize upon the element of chance – both in their experiments as well as in personal encounters. Even changing track in a scientific career should be nothing to be afraid of if one stumbles across something new that is both important and intriguing.

 

Avram Hershko's advise to young scientists to keep an open mind
(00:25:44 - 00:26:56)

 

Peter Agre's advise to young scientists to encounter science as a new adventure
(00:21:45 - 00:22:00)

 

Jack Szostak's advice to talk to people from different fields
(00:05:19 - 00:05:35)

 

Sir Derek Barton (1983) - Creativity in Organic Chemistry

The title of my talk certainly included the key word of this meeting. The minister, I noticed, used the word creativity at least 10 times in his talk. When a minister uses a word, it’s always a good thing to pay attention to. In fact Kappa Cornforth, who is not only a brilliant chemist but also a very able poet, was so inspired by my title that he wrote a poem. And he has given me permission to read this poem to you. Now, I don’t think that you should try to translate it, a poem is too sophisticated and subtle a thing for easy translation. But here you are, here is Kappa Cornforth’s poem about creativity. You see that it is a limerick and you can see how it is supposed to rhyme. And here is the poem: Three kings who were at the nativity Praised Joseph for his creativity And credit is rarely allotted more fairly For all forms of ghosted activity. I think that's charming. Bravo for Kappa Cornforth. Now, I was going to give you a nice talk about creativity with lots of chemical reactions but Count Bernadotte got at me and told me that I had to tell you how to win a Nobel prize when you are not yet 31. So I am giving my talk for those people present who have less than 31 years. Organic chemistry is about organic molecules and there are a number of simple definitions that all students of organic chemistry know. I just remind them... we must take away these lights, where is the light expert... So, now we have to have a number of definitions and in molecules we recognise molecular structure. First of all, we have to determine the molecular formula, which is the number of atoms and the kinds of atoms. Then we have to determine the constitution, a concept originally due to Kekule, that is to say which atoms are bonded to which. We then have to define the configuration, which goes back to the time of van’t Hoff and Le Bel in the last century, and the configurations are the ways of arranging the molecule about the asymmetric centres. And I take the most simple definition at this point, say the asymmetric centres involving carbon atoms where you have four different bonds to one carbon. And as van’t Hoff pointed out, you have 2 to the N isomers, where N is the number of asymmetric centres, and that is a very fine formula which has stood the test of time. And Emil Fischer, for example, spent a long time showing how true it was in sugar chemistry. Now we come to conformation. And conformation, the definition of conformation always leads to argument. I give you my definition, which is a very simple definition, my definition is that the conformation of a molecule of defined constitution and configuration is the various arrangements of that molecule in space, which are not super-poseable. That is to say you allow for bond rotation, angle flexing, bond stretching, that gives you an infinity of conformations for every molecule. You would think that that idea, that concept would be of no value but it so happens that organic molecules usually like to have a preferred conformation. Usually one conformation or several preferred conformations. And the study of these conformations is conformation analysis, that is how the molecule really is in three dimensions, and the correlation of that 3-dimensional preference with chemical and physical properties. Well, to most people today all that sounds very obvious and simple. That is because conformational analysis, which was not known really or not appreciated in 1950, in the 1940’s, has since become something which is taught in all universities, which is taught even to high school students. Let us just take one or two little examples of a simple nature. Here we have our old friend cyclohexane. And cyclohexane has always been used by people who study conformation, because of its symmetry. And you remember that we have two kinds of cyclohexane, if we start putting substituents on, here we’re putting them in the one and four positions, and if they are on the same side of the molecule, imagining the cyclohexane to be flat, which is what we thought it was at one time, then this is cis, and if they are on the opposite sides, they are trans. And we all know nowadays that it is the chair conformation of cyclohexane which is preferred to the boat, or what is in reality the preferred form of the boat when we really do have a boat, that is the twist boat. And I have here some molecular models that I will talk about later and there you can see very clearly, there is a perfectly respectable chair and I just have to flip it and it becomes a boat and then I twist it a little more and it become a twist boat. And we recognise two kinds of hydrogen bonds in the cyclohexane chair conformation, and they are of course just a geometrical analysis of the molecule, those bonds parallel to the threefold axis or axial, and those which are not axial, are equatorial. And to arrive at that took us some time but eventually everybody agreed about that. I know you know all this and I’m going to go through it rather quickly. But there may be some people who don’t. Now, here is another little piece of conformation analysis where we’re looking at what are the conformations of these two compounds, the cis-disubstituted compound and the trans-disubstituted compound. And you see here is one chair and if we pull up this end and push down the other end, we would turn it into another form of chair. And you notice that we have one equatorial bond there and one axial bond there, which will become one equatorial bond and one axial bond. So in fact we have performed no operation whatsoever in chemical terms. All we have done is to contribute to the entropy of the molecule. It’s not true for the trans isomer because there we have two equatorial bonds, and when we flip the ring up and down, we end up with two axial bonds for X. So that’s a real difference that you can - the structures are not superposeable and you can start to discuss why. Now, I am going to say something about Professor Hassel, because I shared the 1969 Nobel prize with Professor Hassel, and the citation was for the concept of conformation. Now, Professor Hassel was born in 1897 and he died two years ago. He spent nearly all his life at Oslo University, though he did his graduate studies in Germany. He was at the university from 1925 to 1964, and then later on, as Professor emeritus, he was Professor from 1934 to 1964. And he went to Germany to learn about x-ray crystallography, but when he got back to Oslo, he found of course that he couldn’t afford any x-ray crystallography apparatus, so he had to make do with measuring dipole moments, which in those days was something you could do relatively inexpensively. And then he moved on to electron diffraction. But these two techniques had a rather bad reputation in the 1930s with organic chemists. Organic chemists at that time didn’t believe very much in the results because there were plenty of symmetrical molecules which were supposed to have dipole moments and which of course really didn’t. And for electron diffraction, you had to compare the density on a photographic plate and that was done with the eye, without an instrument, and so there was always room for interpretation, it’s a subjective measurement. And I draw your attention to one little paper, which I thought was rather nice, from Professor Hassel in 1939, in the JACS, this is a preliminary communication. And in this preliminary communication he describes the tetrabromide of cyclohexane 1,4 diene. It’s a well known compound, nicely crystalline substance, and he said, well, it has two bromines equatorial and two bromines axial. And he determined that by dipole moments, by electron diffraction and then he did some x-ray diffraction. And he writes in his paper something which I think is typical about preliminary communications, he writes: as we would have wished in the case of the x-ray crystallographic part, we should not like to delay publication much longer and are therefore publishing our results now in preliminary form.” And it will not surprise you to learn that there was no subsequent publication in any other form. But of course the war came along and that completely changed the nature of science. In 1943 Professor Hassel published a very important paper in a very obscure journal, and in Norwegian, too. And so nobody knew about this paper. Why he did this, well, of course the country at that time was occupied and probably he didn’t want to send it for publication in Germany and he couldn’t send it for publication in America or in the UK, so he published it in Norwegian. And it was later translated and republished in this reference. So if you want to read it, there it is. And what he does is to summarise his results, dipole moments and electron diffraction results principly, on halogenated cyclohexanes. And he shows that this is the preferred conformation of cyclohexal chloride, this is the preferred conformation for the 1,2 trans dihalides, this is the preferred conformation for the 1,4 trans dihalides and this for the 1,3 cis dihalide. And he suggests that this one can’t exist, but, as you will see later, natural product chemists are perfectly familiar with molecules of that kind. So what he does then is to say that, well, the conformation is preferred when the substituents, the majority of substituents are equatorial. And this is the less preferred conformation when the substituents are axial. That of course is a very simplistic way of presenting things as we now know, but nevertheless at that time it was a very stimulating and important observation. The only problem was, as I said, that we didn’t know about it, because we couldn’t read this journal and nobody really knew about it until it was republished. Now, to continue with this 1943 contribution of Professor Hassel. He didn’t get all of it quite right, he was worried about cyclohexane 1,4 diol, because he said it aught to be in the chair, but it had a dipole moment. So he didn’t want to say there was any of the boat there to explain the dipole moment, which is the real explanation, he wanted to say everything was absolutely clear, it was chair or boat, couldn’t have both, and that therefore cyclohexanedione had to exist partly enolised under the conditions of his experiment. That of course is not true but it’s just a little thing in passing. In 1943 to 1944 he was arrested and he spent two years in prison, so he didn’t make any contributions to the literature during that time. After the war, in 1944 I think, he came back to the University of Oslo and took up his work again with Professor Bastianson. Bastianson, a very able assistant at that time, later became professor of physical chemistry in Oslo, like Hassel, and is now rector. And what they published in Nature in 1946 was this, and this is what first attracted me to the subject of conformational analysis, Hassel and Bastianson found that trans-decalin existed in a 2-chair form, as everybody thought it should, and that cis-decalin existed in another 2-chair form. And that was completely contrary to what was written in all the text books at that time. If you look at the text books of the 1920s and 1930s, you will find that cis-decalin is supposed to exist in a 2-boat conformation. Now, where did that strange idea come from? It came from a writings by Moore in 1918, who had said that cis- and trans-decalin must be different compounds. Must exist and must be different compounds. Now, today of course it’s quite obvious to us that they’re two compounds. But at the time many people believed that cyclohexane was flat, and if you put two flat cyclohexanes together, they said you will only get one decahydronaphthaline, and in fact, of course, the real correct theory teaches that you will get two. So there we are, that changed the text books. Then there was one more publication from Professor Hassel on sugars, where he correctly interpreted the conformations and where he recognised for the first time the existence of the anomeric effect. Now, in 1953 I had to review a field of conformation analysis, and I wrote about Professor Hassel as follows, I think I’ll read it to you: on the electron diffraction of cyclohexane compounds in the vapour phase have contributed greatly to our knowledge of these more subtle aspects of stereochemistry.” I have never been able to find any reference where Professor Hassel wrote anything about me. Now, conformational analysis is nowadays one of the subjects which has a history book about it. And this book deals with the work of Hassel and myself, and it deals also with the work of Professor Prelog and Professor Cornforth. And it’s written by Ramsey and it was published in 1981. And he gives the principle events in conformation analysis, apart from Hassel and myself. And he says, well, in 1890 Sachse wrote a paper about cyclohexane existing in chair and boat forms. That is quite true, that paper had absolutely no affect upon organic chemists, because they could never isolate their isomers which would have been predicted by this postulate. And therefore they said it was wrong and, any case, von Baeyer told us that cyclohexane was probably flat. Then, 1918 the work of Moore, the publication that they’re both theoretical papers, to which I’ve already referred. In the 1920s Hermans and Böeseken in Holland did some very elegant work on the reaction of alpha dials with boric acid and they showed that complexes were formed when the hydroxyls had the right conformational relationship in space. And really that was early conformational analysis. Nobody paid much attention to it though. And then, in 1929, Haworth, the great organic sugar chemist who later got the Nobel prize for vitamin C, he wrote a book on the sugars and he defines the word ‘conformation’ in the way that I have defined it, more or less. And that’s the first reference in the literature I think to the word. Then in 1937/1938 Isbell in another obscure publication studied the bromine oxidation of sugars and corrected and interpreted the results correctly. And finally I must make reference to Professor Prelog, who in 1950 published a paper in the British journal on the conformations of medium sized rings. And I well remember Professor Prelog’s lecture in London in 1949 when he told us about this very interesting work. Now, I said that we could choose the preferred conformation of molecules, we’ve already said the chair is the preferred conformation. This all comes about because of the existence of the ethane barrier. And the ethane barrier was something discovered by Kemp and Pitzer in 1936, who were studying entropy and were then calculating entropy, they were determining entropy calorimetrically and then, calculating it by statistical mechanics, what it should be, and they didn’t get the same result, unless they postulated a barrier to rotation of about 3 kilocals in ethane. And you see that there are two forms, two extreme forms of ethane, the eclipsed and the staggered. And these models, there we are, it’s completely eclipsed there, you can only see that one hydrogen sits on top of the other. And then the alternative is the staggered, where they are at a maximum distance away from each other. And if the forces are attractive, then it is the eclipsed form which would be favoured, and if the forces are repulsive, then it would be the staggered form which would be favoured. These are non bonded interactions between hydrogens, of course. And if you transfer that down to cyclohexane, where all the bonds are completely staggered in the chair conformation, that would favour the chair conformation. Now at this point Professor Eyring came in and made a contribution which everybody thought was very important. Eyring at that time was the leading theoretical chemist in the world, certainly in the States, and everybody followed what he calculated with great attention. And he calculated in a paper in the JACS in 1939 that the eclipsed was more stable than staggered. And so that was exactly the opposite to the reality, but naturally in the 1930s people didn’t know. And then Langseth and Bak in 1940 in the Journal of Chemical Physics published a paper on Raman spectra. And they said that they had showed that cyclohexane was plainer, which of course it’s not. And they said they also showed that this tetrachloroethene was eclipsed for the preferred conformation. So it wasn’t really quite so clear as we now know it to be, it wasn’t clear in the early 1940s. And Professor Hassel in 1943, when he wrote his famous paper, he went to great lengths to show that Langseth and Bak were completely wrong. He didn’t say anything about Eyring. Now I am going to say a little about myself. And you will notice that my list of accomplishments is much longer than Professor Hassel’s. And that is because I know much more about myself than I do about him. And you see I was born in 1918 and that I’m going to die in the next century. And that’s because I wish to attend the Nobel celebrations in 2001, which will be the centenary year and there’s bound to be some splendid celebrations in Stockholm, and I’m sure that the king’s famous Bordeaux will be flowing as it did before. Now, as I said before, the Nobel prize, I shared it, because of my publication and experience in 1950, this very short paper on the conformation of the steroid nucleus. It was a very short paper because I had to type it myself, not having any secretarial facilities. I was 31 at this time when it was published. How did I get to that point, that is what I am trying to teach the younger chemists here. Well, first of all I went to school, everybody has to do that, then my father died suddenly and I left school, so I spent two years in industry doing routine work. And I convinced myself very quickly that this was such a horrible way to spend your life, there must be something better and that better had to be at the university. So although I passed no formal examinations, I got to work and in one year I did three years exams and I got to Imperial College. Imperial College is an excellent place to go to because it’s a very serious university where students still work. The war came along, so we did war time related work and a PhD was quickly obtained in 1942. And if you wish me to write you a letter on a piece of paper that you will never read I can still do it. Then a year in industry, that was a formative period, because in organophosphorus chemistry, where I didn’t discover the Wittig reaction or anything important like that, but I did discover that I didn’t like industry very much because I wanted to do – I knew what I wanted to do and it wasn’t what other people were going to tell me to do. So I took half the salary that I was being paid and I went back to Imperial college as a demonstrator, a demonstrator in practical inorganic chemistry to mechanical engineers. And there is no lower position that you can have in a university than that, that’s really the bottom. But after one year I was promoted and I was allowed to teach physical chemistry so I had three years teaching physical chemistry, chemical kinetics, and then I had one year at Harvard where I wrote this paper, where I replaced R.B.Woodward for a year teaching, and then five years in Birkbeck where I could finally do organic chemistry, that was the night school so it was a very good place to be, because you could work 14 or 15 hours a day, and the only thing was that it wasn’t very good for your wife, had a bad effect on wives. Then the University of Glasgow for two years and then back to Imperial college for 21 years. And now I am in Gif, since 1977 in fact, and I find that my life in the CNRS has completely rejuvenated me, it’s a very stimulating organisation. All Nobel prize winners who get near to 59 should come and join us in the CNRS. Now, I will tell you a little bit about my work at that time, because it’s relevant. What have we established so far, we’ve established that – I tried several things before I found out what I really liked and that I was prepared to pay the price. Now, here you see the first piece of work that I did and your first published work is always interesting and on the first published work it was my own work that I did myself. P.Alexander, he is Professor Alexander now, professor of cancerology in London, but at that time he was just a student like me. And he was studying inert dust insecticides. And he noticed that when the insect died, some of them, particularly this one, tribolium, it gave off something which changed the colour of the inert dust and so there must be an excretion. So I grew the insects, isolated the compound and showed it was ethylquinone and that’s in the biochemical journal in 1943 and it’s the first identification of a volatile substance produced by an insect I believe. But we never went any further in that field. But that was good because that was done in my spare time, that was done after 6 o’clock in the evening or on Sundays, because the rest of the time I was with the secret inks. And here, in 1942 to 1948, I did purely theoretical work on molecular rotation differences, that is looking at the literature of steroids and triterpenoids and trying to correlate the structures proposed with their optical rotations. And this way we could correct quite a number of structures, it’s a principle which goes right back to van’t Hoff, so there’s nothing original in it, it was just the application that was interesting. And then in 1948 force field calculations. I was so impressed by Hassel’s cis-decalin work that I set out to calculate what should be the relative energies of these molecules. And this is the first force field calculations applied to cyclohexane and ethane and things like that. The other work was done by Westheimer on hindered rotation and Hughes and Ingold on the SN2 process. And to do this I designed these molecules, these models that you see here, these were, I did the calculations and gave the plans to a watch maker who then made the models, and these were the models which you converted into steroids, get to be quite big, which enabled me to really get a feeling for conformational analysis. So these force field calculations of course were very trivial things, they just required lots and lots of time and with these models I could measure instead of having to calculate all the distances. But I got things in the right order, more or less in the right numbers, too. And then there was the 1950 paper on the conformational analysis of the steroid nucleus into which I will not go in detail at this time. But I will say that to write this one had to have a prepared mind and what I had was a background in physical chemistry, some knowledge of inorganic chemistry, because I taught that too. But a love for organic chemistry and a complete knowledge, more or less complete knowledge of all steroid and triterpenoid publications at the time, because there weren’t so many. And this part I had all done in my spare time when I wasn’t doing the work for which I was paid to do. And so I would say to you that if you want to do something when you’re young, you have to be really motivated, you have to like it, you have to work very hard, you have to read a lot of literature, you have to do a lot of thinking. And if you are multidisciplinary, you have much better chance of finding something interesting than if you stick to just one discipline. Now, in 1951 Arthur Birch was able to write in the annual reports, and I read this to because it was only one year after the publication: promises to have the same degree of importance as the use of resonance in aromatic systems.” I think he was right. Now, what did I do after 1950 in the world of conformational analysis? We turned first of all to the pentacyclic triterpenoids, these are rather complicated molecules, as you see, they have 8 or 9 centres of asymmetry, depending on whether you look at the unsaturated or the saturated molecule. So there are 128 resomates there and 256 there. We were able to get the problem down to 1 out of 2 resomates by just conformational analysis, by looking at the molecule in this way. And then the x-ray crystallographers came along and I’ve always worked in close collaboration with x-ray crystallographers, I’ve always believed in x-ray crystallography, very rarely do they get anything wrong, just occasionally get something wrong, usually because their assistant has copied it down the wrong way round, their technician, that seems to be the problem. Anyway, this was given to Carlisle, former collaborator of Dorothy Crowfoot, Dorothy Hodgkin, and he got the right result, very nicely. And then in 1953 was lanosterol. And lanosterol was a molecule, which as soon as you had the structure, the constitution, you could write down stereochemistry. And then a little bit later we come to cycloartenol, and this is 1954 and again, as soon as you could write the constitution you could write the stereochemistry. And it’s interesting that we were working, with others of course, in parallel on the lanosterol problem and the cycloartenol problem at the same time and that they are both the key molecules in steroid biosynthesis now. The cycloartenol is a key molecule for plant steroid synthesis and the lanosterol, of course, is the key molecule for the biosynthesis of steroids in mammals and animals. Now, the first exception is always interesting. At this point you see in the early 1950s, everybody was saying everything is always a chair, so there were chairs everywhere and there were never any boats. And then, in collaboration with Professor Magee, Chelsea college, we came across a boat. Now there were some boats where the boat did not have the choice of being a chair, but we all said, everybody said at that time if a 6 member ring has the choice, it will be a chair and never a boat. We came across the first example where a 6 member ring decided to be a boat, even though it could have been a chair, but it is an exceptional case. We were brominating this molecule, these are two meso groups which are actually related to each other, and therefore Hassel wouldn’t have liked that, but that’s the way it is in nature. And we expected of course to obtain two bromo compounds. A bromo compound with a bromine equatorial and a bromo compound with a bromine axial. And instead of that we got indeed two bromo compounds, a major isomer with a bromine equatorial and a minor isomer which should have had the bromine axial but had the bromine equatorial. Now, you could determine which was equatorial and which was axial by infrared and UB spectroscopy at that time, it was a reliable technique. So we knew we were correct in our conclusions and we had to explain it. And the simplest explanation was to say that you had brominated it axially and then the molecule had flipped because it was a ketone, so it was easier to flip it. And secondly, if you did this flipping, the bromine which, if it had been axial, would interact with the two meso groups, would have turned itself over and become equatorial instead. Well, everything that happened afterwards, this is a phenomenon which was studied very extensively in fact, everything that happened afterwards has confirmed this interpretation. And you’ll notice that when you reduce this ketone with borohydride and you go back to a cyclohexane without a trigonal atom, then the conformation changes back again to the preferred chair and you have this very hindered situation where a bromine is axial and pushing against two meso groups which are also axial. So it’s a very hindered exceptional situation. And finally, in 1957 and later in 1960, we investigated what we called conformational transmission, which is our way of saying how a double bond or a feature in a molecule can be transmitted from one end to the other. In triterpenes we made these kinetic studies, we prepared benzyladenine derivatives and measured the kinetics of their formation and showed that the rates really varied quite remarkably with the kind of double bond that you had or didn’t have in the distant ring. So if we take this as 100 with a double bond shifted just one place, it’s 17, that is a factor of more than 5 in rate, which is a very large rate difference. And over here when we saturate it we get 44 and in the steroids it’s even more impressive, all the condensation goes into the 2 position, as we established, but the rates are quite different, the saturated case is 182 on this scale, the scale of this lanostenone. This is 47, the double bond in 7 8, and when you shift the double bond just one position in the ring, in the second ring, the rate increases to 645. So the difference, delta 6 over delta 7 is a factor of 14, and we said this is a clear example of conformational transmission from one ring to another ring. Now, Allinger, first of all Hendrickson and then later Allinger, brought in this method of force field calculations using much improved equations and using of course the computer, and that changes everything. What took me three months laboriously to do by hand in 1947, they can do in a fraction of a second and do it much better. So that completely changes the conformational analysis in fact, you can now do your calculation quicker, much quicker than doing the experiment. And Clark Still is demonstrating exactly how you can do chemical synthesis in that way. Well, what Allinger did then was to recalculate all these effects and see if they existed according to force fields. And happily the answer is that they do and there’s a perfect correlation between our results and those calculated by Allinger using his kind of force field. So I’ve told you then how you can win this Nobel prize, you have to work hard, you have to have a slightly eccentric background, you have to be very catholic in your taste, you have to look in all directions, you have to read a lot and you have to think and it’s thinking which is I think the most important thing. And thinking is something which we don’t do enough of in organic chemistry and happily I have five minutes in which to tell you about thinking. If you look at the great advances that have been made in organic chemistry since the war, I would certainly like to put conformation analysis amongst those, there is also the correlation of orbitals that we will be hearing about in the next talk. That’s certainly very important. And then there are the various reactions which have completely changed synthetic chemistry. Herb Brown, I know, will tell us about hydroboration and borohydrides, that is certainly correct. We could cite the Wittig reaction, that is correct, too. But have we finished, we could talk about Ziegler Natta polymerisation that also completely changed organic chemistry. But nowadays there are some pessimists around and I met one yesterday, a journalist who said there’s nothing going on in chemistry anymore. And I think this, well, I can’t talk about other branches of chemistry, but I know a bit about organometallic chemistry, and I know something about organic chemistry and I am completely opposed to this kind of talk. And the reason, the problem with organic chemistry is that we don’t think enough and that our professors don’t have enough imagination. So when you go back you should tell your professor he should have more imagination. Then things will be better. Now, let me prove to you that we have not come to the end of all the interesting and wonderful things we can find in organic chemistry. Sharpless has announced a couple of years ago how you can attain efficiencies of optical synthesis, asymmetric synthesis, which nearly equal those of enzymes, in some cases do equal those of enzymes. And he does this in a very simple way with titanium, four-valent titanium, as the key to the synthesis, using diethyl tartrate, it’s as simple as that, as the asymmetric inducing reagent and tert-Butyl hydroperoxide, and then he mixes this together and you get these wonderful yields in asymmetric synthesis. In my opinion this, unless someone does something better, this is going to be as important in synthesis as the Wittig reaction. And if I had not been instructed to talk about conformational analysis today, I would have been talking I think about our work on the oxidation of saturated hydrocarbons. Because we have developed a system now which in a very simple way will oxidise saturated hydrocarbons, very selectively and faster than it will oxidise olefins or aromatics and faster than it will oxidise compounds of sulphur as well. So it’s a very selective system, the yields are, if you allow, for recovered hydrocarbon, I think more or less quantitative. And I would like to think that by the time we have the next meeting, when I will talk about it, some very interesting things will have happened. And the system is based on an imaginary P450 enzyme as it was before we had any porphyrins around. What was the world like before we had porphyrins, when we didn’t have any oxygen, or not much, and there was acid of course, lots of acid around. And we said, well, if we’re going to imitate P450, what we need is a hydrocarbon, oxygen, triplet oxygen, and two electrons and two protons. And this is going to give us the alcohol and water. That’s what nature does in P450 enzymes, let us imitate it but let us imitate it in an anaerobic way, prebiotic anaerobic way. So we just took iron powder, it was as simple as that, and acetic acid and pyridine, with a little water and triplet oxygen and hydrocarbon. And with that system you get excellent yields of oxidised saturated hydrocarbon with a preference for attack on CH2, so you get preferentially CH2 going to keta. Mechanism, we’ve shown that this is due to a complex acetative of iron which is reduced by the iron powder and which has this extraordinary properties of selectively oxidised saturated hydrocarbons, you can replace the reducing, iron is not necessary, you can replace it by zinc or you can do it electrochemically which is more important. And using the complex acetate of iron, you can have catalytic turnover numbers of 2,000 or 3,000, which is certainly the kind of numbers that our friends in industry like to see, they don’t like to see 1 or 2, they like to see 2,000 or 3,000. So I think this is going to be important, anyway I’ve told you about it, as that’s my contribution in five minutes to creativity, and thank you for your attention.

Der Titel meines Vortrags enthält gewiss das Schlüsselwort dieser Tagung. Der Minister, so fiel mir auf, verwendete das Wort Kreativität mindestens 10mal in seinem Vortrag. Wenn ein Minister ein Wort verwendet, ist es immer eine gute Idee, dem Aufmerksamkeit zu schenken. Kappa-Cornforth, der nicht nur ein hervorragender Chemiker, sondern auch ein sehr guter Dichter ist, wurde durch meinen Titel so inspiriert, dass er ein Gedicht schrieb; und er hat mir erlaubt, Ihnen dieses Gedicht vorzulesen. Ich glaube, sie sollten nicht versuchen, es zu übersetzen. Ein Gedicht ist zu kompliziert und zu subtil: Es widersetzt sich einer einfachen Übersetzung. Doch hier ist es: Kappa Cornforths Gedicht über die Kreativität. Wie Sie sehen, ist es ein Limerick, und man erkennt, wie es sich reimen soll. Hier ist es: Three kings who were at the nativity Praised Joseph for his creativity And credit is rarely allotted more fairly For all forms of ghosted activity. Ich finde das reizend. Bravo Kappa Cornforth. Nun, ich wollte Ihnen einen interessanten Vortrag über Kreativität halten mit vielen chemischen Reaktionen, doch Graf Bernadotte rückte mir auf den Pelz und sagte mir, ich sollte Ihnen erzählen, wie man einen Nobelpreis gewinnt, bevor man 31 Jahre alt ist. Ich richte also meinen Vortrag an diejenigen unter Ihnen, die das 31. Lebensjahr noch nicht erreicht haben. In der organischen Chemie geht es um organische Moleküle, und es gibt eine Reihe von einfachen Definitionen, die alle Studenten der organischen Chemie kennen. Ich erinnere sie lediglich daran. Wir müssen diese Lampen entfernen, wo ist der Beleuchtungsfachmann. Wir brauchen nun also eine Reihe von Definitionen, und in Molekülen erkennen wir eine molekulare Struktur. Zuerst müssen wir die molekulare Formel ermitteln, die die Anzahl und die Art der Atome angibt. Sodann müssen wir den Aufbau – dieser Begriff geht auf Kekule zurück – ermitteln, d. h.: Wir müssen ermitteln, welche Atome mit welchen verbunden sind. Dann müssen wir eine Konfiguration definieren, was bis auf die Zeiten von van’t Hoff und Le Bel im letzten Jahrhundert zurückgeht. Bei den Konfigurationen handelt es sich um die Anordnung der Moleküle um die asymmetrischen Zentren. An dieser Stelle verwende ich die einfachste Definition. Nehmen wir an, in den asymmetrischen Zentren befänden sich Kohlenstoffatome, wobei jedes Kohlenstoffatom vier verschiedene Bindungen hat. Wie van’t Hoff bereits erklärte, gibt es 2 hoch N (2N) Isomere, wobei N für die Zahl der asymmetrischen Zentren steht, und dies ist eine sehr nützliche Formel, die sich bewährt hat. Emil Fischer hat beispielsweise sehr viel Zeit darauf verwendet zu zeigen, wie zutreffend sie in der Chemie der Zucker ist. Damit kommen wir zum Thema der Konformation, und Konformation, die Definition der Konformation, führt immer zu Streit. Ich gebe Ihnen meine Definition, die eine sehr einfache ist. Meine Definition besagt, dass die Konformation eines Moleküls einer bestimmten Konstitution und Konfiguration den verschiedenen räumlichen Anordnungen dieses Moleküls entspricht, die nicht zur Deckung gebracht werden können. Das heißt: Man erlaubt Bindungsrotationen, Winkelbeugungen, Bindungsdehnungen und das gibt einem für jedes Molekül unendlich viele Konformationen. Man könnte meinen, dass diese Idee, dieses Konzept, keinen Wert hat, doch tatsächlich verfügen organische Moleküle gern über eine bevorzugte Konformation. Normalerweise über eine oder mehrere bevorzugte Konformationen. Und die Untersuchung dieser Konformationen ist die Konformationsanalyse. Sie fragt danach, wie das Molekül tatsächlich im dreidimensionalen Raum angeordnet ist und wie die bevorzugte dreidimensionale Anordnung mit chemischen und physikalischen Eigenschaften korreliert ist. Nun, für die meisten Menschen von heute klingt all das sehr offensichtlich und einfach. Der Grund hierfür ist, dass die Konformationsanalyse, die in den 1950er und 1940er Jahren noch nicht wirklich verstanden wurde, mittlerweile an allen Universitäten, ja sogar in Schulen unterrichtet wird. Schauen wir uns ein oder zwei einfache Beispiele hierfür an. Hier ist unser alter Freund Cyclohexan. Cyclohexan wurde aufgrund seiner symmetrischen Struktur schon immer zum Studium der Konformation verwendet. Sie erinnern sich, dass es zwei Arten von Cyclohexan gibt. Wenn wir beginnen, Substituenten anzubringen – hier bringen wir sie in den Positionen 1 und 4 an – und wenn sie sich auf derselben Seite des Moleküls befinden und wir uns vorstellen, dass Cyclohexan flach ist, wie wir eine Zeit lang geglaubt haben, dann ist dies die cis-Form, und wenn sie sich auf der gegenüberliegenden Seite befinden, die trans-Form. Und wir alle wissen heute, dass Cyclohexan statt der Wannenkonformation bevorzugt die Sesselkonformation annimmt oder die Twistkonformation, bei der es sich in Wirklichkeit um die bevorzugte Form der Wannenkonformation handelt, wenn eine solche vorliegt. Ich habe hier einige Molekülmodelle, über die ich später sprechen möchte, und hier können Sie deutlich sehen, dass dies ein völlig respektabler Sessel ist, und dass ich ihn lediglich umdrehen muss, um eine Wanne zu erhalten, und wenn ich diese noch ein wenig weiter verdrehe, erhalte ich die Twistform der Wanne. Außerdem erkennen wir in der Sesselkonformation von Cyclohexan zwei Arten von Wasserstoffbindungen, und hierbei handelt es sich natürlich lediglich um eine geometrische Analyse des Moleküls. Diese beiden Bindungen sind parallel zur dreifachen Achse und diese, die nicht axial sind, sind äquatorial. Um zu dieser Sicht zu gelangen, benötigten wir etwas Zeit, doch schließlich waren sich alle darin einig. Ich weiß, dass dies allen von Ihnen bekannt ist, und ich werde diese Dinge schnell durchgehen. Doch einigen unter Ihnen sind sie vielleicht unbekannt. Hier ist eine weitere Konformationsanalyse, in der wir uns die Konformation dieser beiden Verbindungen anschauen: die zweifach substituierten cis- und die zweifach substituierte trans-Verbindung. Hier sehen Sie einen Sessel, und wenn wir dieses Ende nach oben ziehen und das andere nach unten drücken, würden wir ihn in eine andere Sesselform verwandeln. Und wie Sie sehen, haben wir hier eine Äquatorialbindung und dort eine Axialbindung, aus denen eine Äquatorial- und eine Axialbindung wird. Um einen chemischen Vorgang handelt es sich hierbei nicht. Wir haben lediglich zur Entropie des Moleküls etwas beigetragen. Für den trans-Isomer trifft dies nicht zu, weil wir es dort mit zwei äquatorialen Bindungen zu tun haben, und wenn wir den Ring nach oben oder unten kippen, erhalten wir zwei Axialbindungen für X. Dies ist demnach ein echter Unterschied, den man diskutieren kann – die Strukturen können nicht übereinandergelegt werden, und man kann beginnen zu fragen, warum dies so ist. Nun werde ich Ihnen etwas über Professor Hassel erzählen, denn ich teile mir den Nobelpreis des Jahres 1969 mit Professor Hassel und im Begründungstext für die Zuerkennung des Preises ist vom Begriff der Konformation die Rede. Professor Hassel wurde 1897 geboren und er starb vor zwei Jahren. Er verbrachte fast sein gesamtes Leben an der Universität Oslo, obwohl er sein Graduiertenstudium in Deutschland absolvierte. Er war von 1925 bis 1964 an der Universität und später auch noch als Professor emeritus. Professor war er von 1934 bis 1964. Nach Deutschland ging er zum Studium der Analyse der Kristallstrukturen mit Hilfe von Röntgenstrahlen, doch als er nach Oslo zurückkehrte, stellte er fest, dass er sich keinen Röntgenkristallographen leisten konnte. Daher musste er sich mit der Messung von Dipolmomenten zufrieden geben, was sich in der damaligen Zeit ohne größeren finanziellen Aufwand relativ einfach machen ließ. Anschließend beschäftigte er sich mit der Elektronenbeugung. In den 1930er Jahren hatten diese beiden Methoden bei den organischen Chemikern jedoch einen schlechten Ruf. Die organischen Chemiker schenkten diesen Ergebnissen damals nur wenig Glauben, da es viele symmetrische Moleküle gab, die angeblich über Dipolmomente verfügen sollten, in Wirklichkeit jedoch keine besaßen. Und für die Elektronenbeugung musste man die Dichte auf einer Fotoplatte ohne Instrumente mit dem bloßen Auge abschätzen, sodass immer Raum für Deutungen blieb. Es ist eine subjektive Messung. Ich möchte Sie auf einen kurzen Aufsatz von Professor Hassel aus dem Jahre 1939 aufmerksam machen, den ich für sehr gut hielt. Er erschien im JACS, wobei es sich um eine Vorabveröffentlichung handelte. In dieser vorläufigen Veröffentlichung beschrieb er das Tetrabromid von Cyclohexan-1,4-Dien. Es ist eine wohlbekannte Verbindung mit einer schönen kristallinen Struktur. Er sagte, sie habe zwei äquatoriale und zwei axiale Bromatome. Er ermittelte das durch Dipolmomente, durch Elektronenbeugung und dann führte er einige Röntgenstrahlbeugungen durch. Er schrieb etwas in seinem Aufsatz, das ich für typisch für vorläufige Mitteilungen halte: wie wir es gerne getan hätten, möchten wir die Veröffentlichung nicht länger verzögern und geben unsere Ergebnisse daher jetzt in einer vorläufigen Form heraus.“ Und es wird Sie nicht wundern zu erfahren, dass es keine weitere Veröffentlichung in irgendeiner anderen Form gab. Doch dann kam der Krieg und das änderte das Wesen der Wissenschaft von Grund auf. und außerdem in Norwegisch. Daher wusste niemand von diesem Aufsatz. Warum er dies tat? Nun ja, sein Land war zu dieser Zeit besetzt und wahrscheinlich wollte er den Aufsatz zur Veröffentlichung nicht nach Deutschland schicken. Und da er ihn zur Veröffentlichung nicht nach Amerika oder Großbritannien schicken konnte, gab er ihn in Norwegen heraus. Und er wurde später übersetzt und mit dieser Referenz neu herausgegeben. Wenn Sie ihn lesen möchten, hier ist er. Was er in dem Aufsatz in erster Linie unternimmt ist dies: Er fasst seine Ergebnisse, hauptsächlich über Dipolmomente und Elektronenbeugungen, bei Cyclohexanen, die mit Halogenen verbunden sind, zusammen. Und er zeigt, dass dies die bevorzugte Konformation von mit Chlor verbundenem Cyclohexan ist. Dies ist die bevorzugte Form der Konformation für die 1,2-trans-Dihalogene, dies die bevorzugte Form der Konformation für die 1,4-trans-Dihalogene und dies die bevorzugte Form der Konformation für des 1,3-cis-Dihalogene. Und er stellt die Vermutung auf, dass diese Form nicht existieren kann, doch – wie wir später noch sehen werden – sind Chemikern, die es mit Naturprodukten zu tun haben, Moleküle dieser Art vollkommen vertraut. Nun, was er sagt ist das Folgende: Die Konformation wird bevorzugt, wenn die Substituenten, die Mehrheit der Substituenten äquatorial ist. Und dies ist die weniger bevorzugte Konformation: wenn die Substituenten axial sind. Wie wir heute wissen, ist dies eine stark vereinfachte Art, diese Dinge darzustellen. Zur damaligen Zeit war es jedoch eine sehr anregende und wichtige Beobachtung. Das einzige Problem war, wie gesagt, dass wir nichts davon wussten, weil wir diese Zeitschrift nicht lesen konnten, und niemand wusste etwas davon, bis der Aufsatz erneut herausgegeben wurde. Nun, um mit diesem Beitrag von Professor Hassel aus dem Jahre 1943 fortzufahren: Er hat nicht alles völlig richtig gesehen. Er sorgte sich um Cyclohexan-1,4-diol, weil er sagte, es sollte eine Sesselkonformation sein, doch es hatte ein Dipolmoment. Er wollte also nicht behaupten, dass es irgendwelche Wannenkonformationen gab, um das Dipolmoment zu erklären, das die wirkliche Erklärung ist. Er wollte behaupten, dass alles vollkommen klar ist: Die Konformation war eine Sessel- oder Wannenkonformation: Beides konnte nicht sein. Daher musste Cyclohexan unter den Bedingungen seines Experiments teilweise in enolisierter Form existieren. Das ist natürlich nicht der Fall, doch es sei nur am Rande erwähnt. In den Jahren 1943 bis 1944 wurde er festgenommen und verbrachte zwei Jahre im Gefängnis, sodass er keine Beiträge zur Forschungsliteratur leisten konnte. Nach dem Krieg, ich glaube im Jahre 1944, kam er zurück an die Universität Oslo und setzte seine Arbeit mit Professor Bastianson fort. Bastianson war damals ein sehr fähiger Assistent, der wie Hassel später Professor für physikalische Chemie in Oslo wurde und heute Rektor der Universität ist. Was sie 1946 gemeinsam in Nature veröffentlichten war Folgendes. Es ist dies, was mich für das Thema der Konformationsanalyse faszinierte: Hassel und Bastianson fanden heraus, dass trans-Decalin in einer 2-Sessel-Form existiert, was nach der Meinung aller auch so sein sollte, und dass cis-Decalin in einer anderen 2-Sessel-Form existiert. Und das stand im völligen Gegensatz zu dem, was man in den damaligen Lehrbüchern fand. Wenn man in die Lehrbücher der 1920er und 1930er Jahre schaut, stellt man fest, dass cis-Decalin in einer 2-Wannen-Konformation existieren sollte. Doch woher stammte diese seltsame Idee? Sie stammte aus den Schriften von Moore aus dem Jahre 1918, der behauptete, dass es sich bei cis- und trans-Decalin um zwei verschiedene Verbindungen handeln müsse. Es musste sie geben und es mussten verschiedene Verbindungen sein. Nun, heute ist es uns natürlich völlig offensichtlich, dass es zwei Verbindungen sind. Doch zur damaligen Zeit waren viele der Überzeugung, dass Cyclohexan flach ist, und dass man nur ein Decahydronaphthalin enthält, wenn man zwei flache Cyclohexane zusammenfügt. Tatsächlich lehrt uns die richtige Theorie, dass man zwei erhält. Da haben wir es. Das hat die Lehrbücher verändert. Dann gab es noch eine weitere Veröffentlichung von Professor Hassel über Zucker, in der er die Konformationen korrekt interpretierte und zum ersten Mal die Existenz des anomeren Effekts erkannte. Nun, im Jahre 1953 musste ich eine Darstellung eines bestimmten Bereichs der Konformationsanalyse geben. Dies ist, was ich über Professor Hassel schrieb. Ich denke, ich lese es Ihnen vor: über die Elektronenbeugung von Cyclohexanverbindungen in der Gasphase haben entscheidend zu unserer Erkenntnis dieser hintergründigen Aspekte der Stereochemie beigetragen.“ Ich habe niemals eine Referenz finden können, in der Professor Hassel etwas über mich geschrieben hat. Nun, die Konformationsanalyse ist heute eines der Themen, zu denen es ein eigenes Buch über ihre Geschichte gibt. Und dieses Buch handelt von den Arbeiten von Hassel und mir und außerdem von den Arbeiten von Professor Prelog und Professor Cornforth. Das Buch wurde von Ramsey geschrieben und 1981 veröffentlicht. Er führt die wichtigsten Ereignisse in der Konformationsanalyse an, außer den Arbeiten von Hassel und mir. Er schreibt, dass 1890 Sachse einen Aufsatz darüber schrieb, dass Cyclohexan in Sessel- und in Wannenform existiert. Das trifft sehr wohl zu. Der Aufsatz hatte jedoch keinerlei Einfluss auf die organischen Chemiker, weil sie niemals in der Lage waren, ihre Isomere zu isolieren, deren Existenz von diesem Postulat vorhergesagt wurde. Daher erklärten sie es für falsch, und außerdem hatte von Baeyer uns gesagt, dass Cyclohexan wahrscheinlich flach war. Im Jahre 1918 legte Moore dann seine Arbeiten vor. Er veröffentlichte zwei theoretische Aufsätze, die ich bereits erwähnt habe. In den 1920er Jahren führten Hermans und Böeseken in Holland einige elegante Untersuchungen über die Reaktion von Alpha-Ringen mit Borsäure durch. Sie zeigten, dass es zur Bildung von Komplexen kam, wenn die Hydroxyle die richtige räumliche Konformationsbeziehung hatten. In Wahrheit handelte es sich dabei um eine frühe Konformationsanalyse. Niemand schenkte ihr jedoch größere Aufmerksamkeit. Und im Jahre 1929 schrieb Haworth, der bedeutende organische Chemiker, der über Zucker arbeitete und später den Nobelpreis für Vitamin C erhielt, ein Buch über die Zucker, und er definierte das Wort „Konformation“ mehr oder weniger so, wie ich es definiert habe. Das ist, glaube ich, die erste Erwähnung des Wortes in der Literatur. In einer anderen obskuren Veröffentlichung studierte Isbell 1937/1938 die Bromoxydation der Zucker. Er korrigierte die Ergebnisse und interpretierte sie richtig. Schließlich muss ich auch Professor Prelog erwähnen, der 1950 in der britischen Fachzeitschrift einen Aufsatz über die Konformationen von Ringen mittlerer Größe veröffentlichte. An Professor Prelogs Vortrag in London im Jahre 1949, in dem er uns über seine hochinteressanten Arbeiten berichtete, kann ich mich noch sehr gut erinnern. Nun, ich habe gesagt, dass wir die bevorzugte Konformation von Molekülen wählen können. Wir haben bereits erwähnt, dass die Sesselkonformation die bevorzugte ist. Dies alles ergibt sich aufgrund der Existenz der Ethanbarriere. Sie wurde 1936 von Kemp und Pitzer entdeckt. Sie studierten damals die Entropie und berechneten sie. Sie bestimmten die Entropie kalorimetrisch und ermittelten anschließend anhand statistischer Mechanik, wie groß sie sein sollte. Sie erhielten jedoch nicht dasselbe Ergebnis, sofern sie nicht für Ethan eine Rotationsbarriere von etwa 3 Kilokalorien postulierten. Und Sie sehen, dass es zwei Formen von Ethan gibt, zwei extreme Formen: die ekliptische und die gestaffelte. In diesen Modellen hier ist die Form vollkommen ekliptisch. Man kann lediglich sehen, dass ein Wasserstoff auf einem anderen sitzt. Die Alternative ist die gestaffelte Form, bei der sie sich in maximalem Abstand voneinander befinden. Wenn die Kräfte Anziehungskräfte sind, dann ist die bevorzugte Form die ekliptische Form, wenn die Kräfte abstoßend sind, dann wird die gestaffelte Form bevorzugt. Dies sind natürlich Wechselwirkungen zwischen Wasserstoffmolekülen bei denen es zu keiner Bindung kommt. Und wenn Sie das auf Cyclohexan übertragen, wo in der Sesselkonformation alle Bindungen vollkommen gestaffelt sind, würde sich dadurch eine Bevorzugung der Sesselkonformation ergeben. An diesem Punkt kam Professor Eyring in die Geschichte. Er leistete einen Beitrag, den jeder für sehr wichtig hielt. Eyring war zum damaligen Zeitpunkt der weltweit - oder zumindest in den USA - führende theoretische Chemiker, und jeder verfolgte seinen Berechnungen mit großer Aufmerksamkeit. In einem Aufsatz, der 1939 im JACS erschien, berechnete er, dass die ekliptische Form stabiler als die gestaffelte war. Das entsprach genau dem Gegenteil dessen, was tatsächlich der Fall war, doch in den 1930er Jahren wusste das natürlich noch niemand. Dann veröffentlichten Langseth und Bak 1940 im Journal of Chemical Physics einen Aufsatz über Raman-Spektren. Sie behaupteten darin, dass sie bewiesen hätten, dass Cyclohexan ein flaches Molekül ist, was es natürlich nicht ist. Und sie erklärten, dass sie außerdem bewiesen hätten, dass dieses Tetrachlorethan für die bevorzugte Konformation ekliptisch war. Es war also tatsächlich nicht so klar, wie es bei unserem jetzigen Wissensstand ist, in den frühen 1940er Jahren war es nicht klar. Und in seinem berühmten Aufsatz von 1943 war Professor Hassel sehr darum bemüht zu zeigen, dass Langseth und Bak die Sache völlig falsch sahen. Über Eyring sagte er nichts. Nun werde ich ein wenig über mich selbst erzählen. Und Sie werden sehen, dass die Liste meiner Leistung wesentlich länger ist als die von Professor Hassel. Der Grund dafür ist, dass ich viel mehr über mich selbst als über ihn weiß. Ich wurde 1918 geboren und werde im nächsten Jahrhundert sterben. Der Grund dafür ist, dass ich an den Nobelpreis-Feierlichkeiten des Jahres 2001 teilnehmen möchte, dem 100. Jahr der Verleihungen, in dem es in Stockholm garantiert einige großartige Festivitäten geben wird, und ich bin mir sicher, dass der berühmte Bordeaux des Königs - wie in der Vergangenheit - fließen wird. Nun, wie ich bereits erwähnte, habe ich mir 1950 den Nobelpreis geteilt, aufgrund meiner Veröffentlichungen und Erfahrung, für diesen kurzen Aufsatz zur Konformation des Steroidkerns. Es war ein sehr kurzer Aufsatz, weil ich ihn selber tippen musste, da ich keinen Sekretär hatte, der mich hätte unterstützen können. Ich war 31 Jahre alt, als der Aufsatz veröffentlich wurde. Wie bin ich an diesen Punkt gelangt? Das ist es, was ich den jüngeren Chemikern hier mitteilen möchte. Nun, zunächst einmal ging ich zur Schule, das muss jeder. Dann starb plötzlich mein Vater und ich verließ die Schule. Ich verbrachte zwei Jahre in der Industrie mit routinemäßigen Arbeiten. Und ich gelangte sehr schnell zu der Überzeugung, dass dies eine furchtbare Art sei, sein Leben zu verbringen. Es musste etwas Besseres geben, und dieses Bessere musste an der Universität zu finden sein. Obwohl ich also keine formalen Prüfungen ablegte, begann ich zu arbeiten und in einem Jahr legte ich die Prüfungen von drei Jahren ab und ich kam ans Imperial College. Das Imperial College war ein hervorragender Studienort, denn es ist eine sehr ernst zu nehmende Universität, an der Studenten noch arbeiten. Dann kam der Krieg, sodass wir damit zusammenhängende Arbeiten ausführten, und ich legte meine Doktorprüfung sehr schnell im Jahre 1942 ab. Ich erfand Geheimtinten. Und wenn Sie möchten, dass ich Ihnen auf einem Stück Papier einen Brief schreibe, den Sie niemals lesen werden, so kann ich das noch immer. Dann verbrachte ich ein Jahr in der Industrie. Das war eine prägende Zeit, die ich in der phosphororganischen Chemie zubrachte. Er entdeckte zwar nicht die Wittig-Reaktion oder irgendetwas vergleichbar Wichtiges, dafür aber, dass es mir in der Industrie nicht sonderlich gefiel, denn ich wollte – ich wusste, was ich tun wollte, und es war nicht das, was andere Leute mir befehlen würden. Also akzeptierte ich die Hälfte des mir damals gezahlten Gehalts und ging als Vorführer zurück ans Imperial College. Ich arbeitete als Vorführer in der praktischen anorganischen Chemie für Maschinenbauer. Man kann an einer Universität keine niedrigere Position bekleiden als diese. Ich war wirklich ganz unten. Doch nach einem Jahr wurde ich befördert und man erlaubte mir physikalische Chemie zu unterrichten. Ich unterrichtete also drei Jahre physikalische Chemie, chemische Kinetik und verbrachte dann ein Jahr in Harvard, wo ich diesen Aufsatz schrieb. Ich vertrat dort die Lehrverpflichtung von R. B. Woodward. Anschließend ging ich für 5 Jahre ans Birbeck College, wo ich endlich organische Chemie betreiben konnte. Das war die Abendschule, es war also ein sehr guter Arbeitsplatz, da man täglich 14 oder 15 Stunden arbeiten konnte. Das einzige war, dass es nicht gut für die Ehefrau war, es hatte eine schlechte Auswirkung auf Ehefrauen. Dann ging ich für 2 Jahre an die Universität Glasgow und anschließend zurück ans Imperial College, wo ich 21 Jahre blieb. Und nun bin ich in Gif seit 1977, um genau zu sein. Ich finde, dass mein Leben am CNRS mich völlig verjüngt hat. Es ist eine äußerst anregende Organisation. Alle Nobelpreisträger, die sich dem 59. Geburtstag nähern, sollten zu uns ans CNRS kommen. Ich möchte Ihnen jetzt ein wenig über meine Arbeit zum damaligen Zeitpunkt erzählen, da es relevant ist. Was haben wir bisher festgestellt? Wir haben festgestellt, dass ich verschiedene Dinge ausprobiert habe, ehe ich feststellte, was mir wirklich gefiel und dass ich bereit war, den Preis dafür zu zahlen. Nun, hier sehen Sie die erste Arbeit, die ich unternahm. Die erste veröffentlichte Arbeit ist immer interessant. Die erste veröffentlichte Arbeit war meine eigene Arbeit, die ich selbst durchführte. P. Alexander, der jetzt Professor ist, Professor für Onkologie in London, war damals lediglich Student wie ich. Er untersuchte träge Staubinsektizide. Er bemerkte, dass - wenn Insekten starben - einige von ihnen, besonders dieses hier, Tribolium, etwas abgab, was die Farbe des trägen Staubs änderte und daher musste eine Ausscheidung vorliegen. Ich züchtete also die Insekten, isolierte die Verbindung und zeigte, dass es sich um Ethylquinin handelt. Das war in der Zeitschrift für Biochemie im Jahre 1943 und ich glaube es ist die erste Bestimmung einer von einem Insekt produzierten flüchtigen Substanz. Doch wir trieben die Forschungen auf diesem Gebiet nicht weiter. Das war jedoch gut, weil das in meiner Freizeit geschah, das geschah nach 18:00 Uhr oder an Sonntagen, weil ich in der restlichen Zeit mit den Geheimtinten beschäftigt war. Und hier, in den Jahren 1942 bis 1948, befasste ich mich ausschließlich mit den Rotationsunterschieden von Molekülen, d. h. ich durchforschte die Literatur der Steroide und Triterpenoide und versuchte die vorgeschlagenen Strukturen mit ihren optischen Rotationen zu korrelieren. Und auf diese Weise konnten wir eine ganze Reihe von Strukturen korrigieren. Es ist ein Prinzip, das bis auf van’t Hoff zurückgeht. Es ist also nicht Originelles dabei, interessant war lediglich die Anwendung. Dann kamen im Jahre 1948 die Kraftfeldberechnungen. Ich war so beeindruckt von Hassels Arbeiten über cis-Decalin, dass ich es mir zum Ziel setzte zu berechnen, welches die relativen Energien dieser Moleküle sein sollten. Und dies sind die ersten auf Cyclohexan und Ethan und solche Stoffe angewendeten Kraftfeldberechnungen. Die anderen Arbeiten über die eingeschränkte Rotation wurden von Westheimer durchgeführt und Hughes und Ingold arbeiteten über den SN2-Prozess. Und um dies tun zu können, entwarf ich diese Moleküle, diese Modelle, die Sie hier sehen. Ich führte die Berechnungen aus und gab die Pläne einem Uhrmacher, der dann die Modelle baute. Und dies waren die Modelle, die man in Steroide umwandelte. Sie waren ziemlich groß, so dass ich ein Gefühl für die Konformationsanalyse entwickeln konnte. Diese Kraftfeldberechnungen waren natürlich sehr trivial. Sie erforderten lediglich jede Menge Zeit und anhand dieser Modelle konnte ich die Entfernungen messen, statt sie alle berechnen zu müssen. Doch es gelang mir, die Dinge in die richtige Reihenfolge zu bringen und auch mehr oder weniger die richtigen Werte zu ermitteln. Und dann gab es da noch den Aufsatz von 1950 über die Konformationsanalyse der Steroidkerne, auf den ich heute nicht genauer eingehen werde. Doch ich will anmerken, dass man in einer vorbereiteten geistigen Verfassung sein musste, um ihn zu schreiben und dass, worüber ich verfügte, ein Hintergrund in der physikalischen Chemie war, sowie über einiges Wissen in der anorganischen Chemie, weil ich die auch unterrichtete. Doch eine Liebe zur anorganischen Chemie und eine vollständige Kenntnis, mehr oder weniger vollständige Kenntnis, aller damaligen Publikationen über Steroide und Triterpenoide, da es noch nicht so viele waren. Diesen Teil hatte ich in meiner Freizeit erarbeitet, wenn ich nicht mit der Arbeit beschäftigt war, für die ich bezahlt wurde. Und daher würde ich Ihnen sagen: Wenn Sie als junger Mensch etwas erreichen wollen, dann müssen Sie wirklich motiviert sein, Sie müssen Ihre Arbeit gerne tun und sehr hart arbeiten, Sie müssen viel Literatur lesen, Sie müssen viel nachdenken. Und wenn Sie in mehreren Disziplinen arbeiten, haben Sie eine wesentlich größere Chance etwas Interessantes zu finden, als wenn Sie sich nur in einer Disziplin auskennen. Im Jahre 1951 konnte Arthur Birch in den Jahresberichten schreiben – und ich lese Ihnen auch dies vor, da es nur ein Jahr nach der Veröffentlichung geschrieben wurde -: verspricht ebenso wichtig zu werden wie die Verwendung der Resonanz in aromatischen Systemen.“ Ich glaube, er hatte Recht. Was tat ich nach 1950 in der Welt der Konformationsanalyse? Zuerst wendete ich mich den pentazyklischen Triterpenoiden zu. Dies sind ziemlich komplizierte Moleküle. Wie Sie sehen, haben Sie 8 oder 9 Zentren der Asymmetrie, je nachdem, ob Sie sich die ungesättigten oder gesättigten Moleküle anschauen.Es gibt hier 128 Resomate und dort 256. Allein mit Hilfe der Konformationsanalyse konnte ich das Problem auf 1 aus 2 Resomaten reduzieren, indem ich das Molekül auf diese Weise betrachtete. Und dann kamen die Röntgenkristallographen hinzu, und ich habe immer eng mit ihnen zusammengearbeitet. Sie machen nur sehr selten Fehler, nur ab und zu unterläuft ihnen ein Fehler, normalerweise weil ihr Assistent etwas falsch herum notiert hat, ihr Laborassistent. Das scheint das Problem zu sein. Wie auch immer: Dies wurde Carlisle übergeben, dem früheren Mitarbeiter von Dorothy Crowfoot, Dorothy Hodgkin, und er erhielt die korrekten Ergebnisse, was sehr schön war. Lanosterol war ein Molekül, bei dem Sie, sobald Sie die Struktur kannten, die Stereochemie niederschreiben konnten. Ein wenig später kommen wir zu Cycloartenol. Dies war im Jahre 1954 und auch hier war es wieder möglich – sobald man die Konstitution niederschreiben konnte – die Stereochemie ebenfalls anzugeben. Es ist interessant, dass ich – natürlich mit anderen – gleichzeitig parallel an dem Lanesterol-Problem und dem Cycloartenol-Problem arbeitete, und dass es heute die beiden Schlüsselmoleküle in der Steroidbiosynthese sind. Cycloartenol ist ein Schlüsselmolekül für die Steroidsynthese bei Pflanzen und Lanosterol ist natürlich das Schlüsselmolekül für die Biosynthese der Steroide bei Säugern und anderen Tieren. Nun, die erste Ausnahme ist immer interessant. Sehen Sie, zu diesem Zeitpunkt, in den frühen 1950er Jahren, sagte jeder, dass alles immer ein Sessel ist. Überall waren Sessel und nirgendwo gab es irgendwelche Wannen. Dann stieß ich – in Zusammenarbeit mit Professor Magee vom Chelsea College – auf eine Wannenform. Nun, es gab einige Wannen bei denen es nicht möglich war, ein Sessel zu sein, es bestand keine Wahl. Doch wir alle sagten, jeder sagte damals: Wenn ein Ring aus 6 Elementen die Wahl hat, dann wird es ein Sessel und niemals eine Wanne sein. Wir trafen auf das erste Beispiel eines Sechserrings, der sich entschied, eine Wanne zu sein, obwohl er ein Sessel hätte sein können, doch das ist ein außergewöhnlicher Fall. Wir haben dieses Molekül bromiert. Dies sind zwei Meso-Gruppen, die miteinander verwandt sind. Daher würde das Hassel nicht gefallen haben, doch so verhalten sich die Dinge nun einmal in der Natur. Und wir haben natürlich zwei Bromverbindungen erwartet: eine Bromverbindung mit einem Bromatom in der Äquatorialebene und eine Bromverbindung mit einem Bromatom in der Axialebene. Stattdessen erhielten wir tatsächlich Verbindungen mit zwei Bromatomen: einen Hauptisomer mit einem Bromatom in der Äquatorialebene und einen Nebenisomer, der das Bromatom in der Axialebene hätte haben sollten, es jedoch in der Äquatorialebene hatte. Nun, damals konnte man mit Hilfe von Infrarot- und UB-Spektroskopie ermitteln, welches Atom sich in der Äquatorial- und welches sich in der Axialebene befand. Es war eine zuverlässige Methode. Wir wussten also, dass unsere Schlussfolgerungen richtig war, und wir mussten sie erklären. Und die einfachste Erklärung bestand darin zu sagen, dass wir das Molekül axial bromiert hatten und dass es dann „umgekippt“ war, da es ein Keton war, so dass es leichter war, es umzukippen. Und zweitens, wenn es zu diesem Umkippen kam, würde das Bromatom, das – wenn es axial angeordnet gewesen wäre – mit den beiden Meso-Gruppen in Wechselwirkung getreten wäre, sich umgedreht haben und stattdessen die äquatoriale Ausrichtung angenommen haben. Nun, alles was danach geschah – dies ist ein Phänomen, das sehr intensiv studiert wurde – alles was danach geschah, bestätigte diese Deutung. Und es wird Ihnen auffallen, dass dann die Konformation sich zur bevorzugten Sesselform zurückverwandelt. Man hat dann diese eingeschränkte Situation, in der sich ein Bromatom in der axialen Position befindet und gegen die beiden Meso-Gruppen drückt, die sich ebenfalls in der axialen Position befinden. Es ist also eine sehr eingeschränkte, außergewöhnliche Situation. Und im Jahre 1957 und später im Jahr 1960 untersuchten wir schließlich, was wir als Konformationsübertragung bezeichneten. Dies ist unsere Art zu beschreiben, wie eine Doppelbindung oder eine Eigenschaft in einem Molekül vom einen Ende eines Moleküls zum anderen übertragen werden kann. Diese kinetischen Untersuchungen führten wir an Triterpenen durch. Wir bereiteten Derivate von Benzyladenin vor und maßen die Kinetik ihrer Konformationen. Wie zeigten, dass die Raten in Abhängigkeit davon beträchtlich schwankten, welche Doppelbindung man im entfernten Ring hatte oder nicht hatte. Wenn wir dies als 100 nehmen mit einer um eine Stelle verschobenen Doppelbindung, so erhalten wir 17. Das ist ein Faktor von mehr als 5 in der Rate, was wirklich einen beträchtlichen Ratenunterschied darstellt. Und hier drüben erhalten wir 44, wenn wir es saturieren, und bei den Steroiden ist es sogar noch beeindruckender. Die gesamte Kondensation geht in die zweite Position, wie wir ermittelt haben. Doch die Raten sind sehr verschieden. Der saturierte Fall ist 182 auf dieser Skala, der Skala dieses Lanosterons. Dies ist 47, die Doppelbindung ist 78, und wenn Sie die Doppelbindung nur um eine Position im Ring verschieben, im zweiten Ring, erhöht sich die Rate auf 645. Der Unterschied, delta6/delta7, ist ein Faktor von 14, und wir sagten, dass dies ein eindeutiges Beispiel für eine Konformationsübertragung von einem Ring auf einen anderen ist. Nun, Allinger, zuerst Hendrickson und später dann Allinger, führten diese Methode der Kraftfeldberechnung ein, für die sie deutlich verbesserte Gleichungen und natürlich auch den Computer verwendeten, und das änderte alles. Was mich 1947 von Hand drei Monate kostete, konnten sie im Bruchteil einer Sekunde erledigen und außerdem viel besser. Das änderte die Konformationsanalyse völlig. Man kann seine Berechnungen heute schneller durchführen, sehr viel schneller als ein Experiment. Clark Still zeigt, wie man chemische Synthese auf genau diese Weise durchführen kann. Anschließend berechnete Allinger alle diese Effekte neu und er überprüfte, ob sie gemäß den Kraftfeldern existierten. Glücklicherweise ist die Antwort hierauf positiv. Es besteht eine perfekte Korrelation zwischen unseren Ergebnissen und den von Allinger mit seiner Art von Kraftfeld errechneten Ergebnissen. Ich habe Ihnen nun erzählt, wie man diesen Nobelpreis gewinnt. Man muss hart arbeiten, man braucht einen etwas exzentrischen Hintergrund, man muss in seinem Geschmack sehr katholisch sein, man muss in alle Richtungen schauen, man muss viel lesen und man muss nachdenken. Und das Denken, meine ich, ist das Wichtigste. Das Denken ist etwas, was in der organischen Chemie zu wenig geschieht, und glücklicherweise habe ich noch 5 Minuten, um Ihnen etwas darüber zu erzählen. Wenn man sich die großen Fortschritte ansieht, die in der organischen Chemie seit dem Krieg erzielt wurden, würde ich die Konformationsanalyse sicherlich dazuzählen wollen. Dann gibt es da noch die Korrelation der Umlaufbahnen, über die wir im nächsten Vortrag etwas erfahren werden. Sie ist sicher sehr wichtig. Und dann gibt es noch die verschiedenen Reaktionen, die die synthetische Chemie völlig verändert haben. Ich weiß, dass uns Herb Brown etwas über Hydroborierung und über Borhybride erzählen wird, das ist sicher richtig. Wir könnten die Wittig-Reaktion anführen, das wäre auch richtig. Sind wir damit jedoch am Ende? Wir könnten auch über die Ziegler-Natta-Polymerisation reden, auch die hat die organische Chemie völlig verändert. Doch heutzutage gibt es Pessimisten, und gestern habe ich einen getroffen: Einen Journalisten, der behauptete, dass sich in der Chemie heutzutage nichts mehr tut. Nun, was ich hierzu denke ist dies: Über andere Zweige der Chemie kann ich mich nicht äußern, doch ich verstehe ein wenig von metallorganischer Chemie und von organischer Chemie, und ich bin ein Feind solchen Geredes. Und der Grund, das Problem der organischen Chemie ist, dass wir nicht genug denken und dass unsere Professoren nicht genug Einbildungskraft haben. Wenn Sie wieder zuhause sind, sollten Sie ihren Professoren sagen, dass sie nicht genug Einbildungskraft haben. Dann werden sich die Dinge verbessern. Nun, lassen Sie mich Ihnen beweisen, dass wir das Ende der interessanten und wunderbaren Dinge, die in der organischen Chemie zu entdecken sind, nicht erreicht haben. Sharpless hat vor ein paar Jahren verkündet, wie man die Effizienz der optischen Synthese, der asymmetrischen Synthese, so sehr erhöhen kann, dass man fast diejenige von Enzymen erreichen kann, was in einigen Fällen auch tatsächlich erreicht wurde. Er erreicht dies auf sehr einfache Weise mit Titan, vierwertigem Titan als Schlüssel der Synthese, unter Verwendung von Diethyltartrat –so einfach ist das – als asymmetrischem, induzierendem Reagens, und mit Tert-Butylhydroperoxid. Und dann mischt er dies zusammen und man erhält diese wunderbaren Ergebnisse asymmetrischer Synthese. Nach meiner Meinung wird dies, wenn nicht jemand etwas Besseres findet, in der Synthese ebenso wichtig sein wie die Wittig-Reaktion. Und wenn ich gebeten worden wäre, heute über Konformationsanalyse zu sprechen, dann würde ich über unsere Arbeiten über die Oxydation gesättigter Kohlenwasserstoffe gesprochen haben. Weil wir jetzt ein System entwickelt haben, das auf eine sehr einfache Art und Weise gesättigte Kohlenwasserstoffe oxidieren wird, sehr selektiv und schneller, als es Olefine oder aromatische Verbindungen oxidiert, und schneller als es Schwefelverbindungen oxidiert. Es ist also ein sehr selektives System. Die Erträge sind, wenn Sie gestatten, für wiedergewonnene Kohlenwasserstoffe mehr oder weniger quantitativ, denke ich. Und ich möchte vermuten, dass zum Zeitpunkt unseres nächsten Treffens, wenn ich darüber sprechen werde, einige sehr interessante Dinger geschehen sein werden. Und das System basiert auf einem imaginären P450-Enzym, wie es der Fall war, bevor wir irgendwelche Porphyrine hatten. Wie sah die Welt aus, als wir Porphyrine hatten, als wir noch keinen Sauerstoff hatten, oder zumindest nur wenig, und natürlich Säure, jede Menge Säure. Wir sagten: Nun gut, wenn wir P450 imitieren wollen, benötigen wir einen Kohlenwasserstoff, Sauerstoff, Triplet-Sauerstoff, sowie zwei Elektronen und zwei Protonen. Dies gibt uns Alkohol und Wasser. Das ist es, was die Natur mit P450 Enzymen tut. Lassen Sie es uns imitieren, jedoch auf anaerobe Weise, präbiotische anaerobe Weise. Wir nahmen also einfach Eisenpulver – so einfach war das – und Essigsäure und Pyridin, mit etwas Wasser und einem Kohlenwasserstoff. Mit diesem System erhält man hervorragende Erträge von oxidierten, gesättigten Kohlenwasserstoffen mit einer Vorliebe für Angriffe auf CH2, so dass man vorzugsweise CH2 erhält. Wir haben gezeigt, dass der Grund hierfür ein komplexes Eisenacetat ist, das durch das Eisenpulver reduziert wird und das diese außerordentliche Eigenschaft hat, gesättigte Kohlenwasserstoffe selektiv zu oxidieren. Sie können das reduzierende Eisen ersetzen, es ist nicht erforderlich. Man kann auch Zink verwenden oder elektrochemisch vorgehen, was wichtiger ist. Und mit Hilfe des komplexen Eisenacetats können Sie katalytische Durchsatzzahlen von 2000 oder 3000 erreichen. Das sind sicherlich die Zahlen, die unsere Freunde in der Industrie gerne sehen. Die Zahlen 1 oder 2 gefallen ihnen nicht: Sie wollen 2000 und 3000 sehen. Ich glaube also, dass dies wichtig sein wird. Wie auch immer: Ich habe Ihnen davon erzählt. Das ist mein fünfminütiger Beitrag zum Thema Kreativität. Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Derek Barton emphasising the importance of multidisciplinary in research
(00:29:13 - 00:29:33)

 

 

 

 4) Choosing the right project for postdoctoral research

Even though choosing a general direction that matches one’s interests and skills is of course key for a successful scientific career, the choice of a specific project is of no lesser importance and can make or break a career. As exemplified by Oliver Smithies, the choice of a PhD project is not necessarily the be-all and end-all of a scientific career. The key thing is to learn and have fun. Indeed, others have described it as the process of getting a ‘provisional driving license’ to do science. However, the choice of a postdoctoral project is a weightier decision and should be carefully considered. Such a choice can essentially be viewed as a balancing act between two important considerations: choosing a project that is both sufficiently ambitious to provide important new insights while also remaining feasible within a given period of time and with the available technology. The Nobel Laureates Jack Szostak and Dan Shechtman offered their advice regarding the selection of a lab in which to do postdoctoral research in this 2015 webinar on persevering in science.

 

Jack Szostak's advice of choosing a project that is both sufficiently ambitious to provide important new insights while also remaining feasible within a given period
(00:03:54 - 00:04:19)

 

Dan Shechtman's advice to select a smaller lab environment with flat hierarchies
(00:08:30 - 00:09:12)

 

Even if not explicitly offered as advice to young scientists or discussed in the context of postdoctoral research, in his lecture at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in 1972, Ragnar Granit made some extremely cogent remarks with respect to the aims that all scientists should have for their research.

 

Ragnar Granit (1972) - Discovery and Understanding

I was asked some time ago to write an introductory article for the annual review of physiology. Now then, grappling with the necessity of supplying something of general interest, I remembered the frame of mind in which I had spent the early spring 1941. After a bicycle accident that crushed one knee. Resting could not then fill out all my time, besides it compounded the constraint I felt being confined to intake alone. While all the time the creative urge demanded a release in some form of output. In this predicament I recalled an early lecture of mine to an academic student body under the heading And this put me on to write a collection of essays in Swedish ‘Ung mans väg til Minerva’ (‘Young man’s way to Minerva’), which was published in the autumn of 1941. My book preceded Walter Cannon’s ‘The Way of an Investigator’ by a few years. When his work appeared I read it eagerly and found a great deal of overlap, both in his point of view and in his emphasis. Far more has since been written on the same subject, more systematic, better documented books covering the whole field systematically. Thus it was with feelings of anxiety that I looked up my own work. Re-reading it and musing over it, I found it indeed a book by a younger man than my present self. Written for a younger man fired by enthusiasm for a life devoted to science. The tutor, slightly older than his listeners, speaks to them about the courting of Minerva, he tells them about her apparent fickleness and real austerity of her views and ambitions and success and of much else. Not forgetting to mention the radiance of her smile on the rare occasions when she bestows it. Now, 30 years later, I return to such matters in a mood of detachment. Many people regard detachment as one of the great virtues, but it is probably not conducive to scientific creativity of the kind that was life itself to the young author of Minerva. Passion is a better word for describing that attitude. Young people are out for themselves, to make discoveries, to see something that others have not seen before. They may be satisfied with a modicum of analysis because there’s always something around the corner to look at. Perhaps something new and quite unexpected, exciting and important. At any rate it’s temptation hard to resist. Later in life one may feel it less compelling to discover something, rather does one prefer to learn to understand a little on nature’s ways in a wider context. Then detachment comes in handy. One realises that it really is a virtue. The virtue of those who have to weigh and judge. In this state of mind I have decided to offer some comments on discovery and understanding. In the main I shall restrict myself to experimental biology. By discovery we mean in the first instance an experimental result that is new. In a more trivial sense most results are new just as they always impart knowledge of some kind. For practical purposes I tend to ask myself when reading a paper: Is this knowledge or real knowledge? Similarly one may ask: Is this result new or really new? In the latter case it is a discovery and a discovery tends to break the canopies of dogma around an established view just as compartment with heavy particles tends to scatter the nucleus of an atom. In this type of discovery there is an element of unexpectedness. One of the best known examples is Roentgen’s discovery of the rays that in many languages bear his name. That came as a surprise to him and to the rest of the scientific world. There is a second and equally fundamental type of discovery the delivery of experimental evidence for a view that is probable, yet not established. Because such evidence as there is has not yet excluded alternative possibilities. An example of the latter type is the theory of chemical transmission, a synopsis that is nerve endings. Suggested by T.R. Elliot in 1905 but not proved until very much later by Otto Loewi and Henry Dale. This is the most common type of discovery, confirmation by evidence or one theory from a number of alternative hypotheses. Either type of discovery, to deserve the term, must have far reaching consequences, as the cases illustrated now indeed have had. Unless this criterion is satisfied, we are not willing to use a grand word like ‘discovery’, instead of speaking modestly of a new result, more or less interesting, as the case may be. The experimenter himself may not always understand what he has been seeing, though realising that it is something quite new and probably very important. Thus for instance, when Frithiof Holmgren in 1865 put one electrode on the cornel of the eye and another on the cut end of the optic nerve of a frog, he recorded a response to onset and sensation of illumination. This he held to be a Du Bois-Reymond’s negative variation. That is the action currents of the optic nerve fibres. These were what he had been looking for and therefore expected to find. Six years later, Holmgren started shifting his electrodes around the bulb and soon understood that the distributional clarity he had obtained required that the response had to originate in the retina itself. Dewar and McKendrick independently re-discovered the electroretinogram on equally false supposition. That the retina should display the photoelectric effects which at that time had been recently discovered by Willoughby Smith. In both cases the electroretinogram was the unexpected result of something expected. It was an important discovery, the first evidence for an electrochemical process generated by stimulation of a sense organ. Evidence that something objective connected, a physically defined stimulus to a sensory experience. Quite rightly Holmgren titled his first paper in translation It also satisfied the criterion that the discovery should have far reaching consequences. I was myself concerned with three of them, the discovery of inhibition to light in the retina, the demonstration that an important component of light adaptation and dark adaptation was electrical in origin and not due to the photo pigments alone. And the development of the theory that generates a potential stimuli sensory nerves to this charge. Subsequent workers in this field could easily extend the list if further proof of its importance should be required. Quite interesting is the period of latency between the discovery of the electroretinogram and an elementary understanding on what it meant. In the present context the latency serves to emphasise that discovery and understanding really are different concepts and are not arbitrarily differentiated. There is in discovery a quality of uniqueness tied to a particular moment in time while understanding goes on and on from level to level of penetration and insight and thus is a process that lasts for years, in many cases for the discoverer’s lifetime. The young scientists often seem to share with the layman the view that scientific progress can be looked upon as one long string of pearls made up of bright discoveries. This standpoint is reflected in the will of Alfred Nobel whose mind was just as an inventor, as we heard, loaded with good ideas for application. These are predisposed definable discoveries. The following are his own formulations from his Will. The most important discovery or invention within the field of physics. The most important discovery within the domain of physiology or medicine. The most important chemical discovery or improvement. Only in chemistry of which he had first hand experience as an inventor of smokeless powder and dynamite did he allow that the Nobel Prize would also be given for an improvement. So it’s well known that one of his major contributions to the invention of dynamite was in the nature of an improvement. He made the use of dynamite nearly foolproof by adding kieselgur to the original blasting oil that proved so dangerous in practice. This finding made him realise that there are inventions and discoveries which have to be improved before their significance can be established. One should thread warily through these subtle distinctions. I can think of Nobel prizes in chemistry that have been given for improvements. But do not remember ever in 30 years of academy award voting having heard any suggestion legitimised by this term. It is easy to understand the emphasis, or rather over-emphasis on discovery as the real goal of scientific endeavour. By definition used here a discovery has important consequences and initiates a fresh line of development. It catches the eye and in the present age it is pushed into the limelight by various journals devoted to the popularisation of science, sometimes even by newspapers. In my youth we were much impressed by our philosopher of the University of Lund, Hans Larsson, who, I believe, wrote only in Swedish. I remember a thesis of his to the effect that in our thinking we try to reach point commanding a view. In science the discovery is often seen as a view entirely of this kind. The discoverer himself may not always climb to the top of his own tower, others make haste to reach it, outpacing him. In the end, many people are there most of them trying to do much the same thing. The discoverer himself should be excused if he’s possessed by desire to find a peaceful retreat where he can do something else and quietly erect another lookout. A systematic classification of types of discovery cannot be attempted here, but some comments should be made. There are for instance the discoveries that ride on the wave of a technical advance. At the time it became possible to stimulate nerves electrically in the last century. It became possible to discover any number of new and important mechanisms of nervous control. Small wonder that the great German physiologist Carl Ludwig would say to his pupils: Equally optimistic was Helmholtz, when as professor of physiology at Heidelberg he said that it was merely necessary to take a deep dig with the spade in order to find something new and interesting. Transferring these amiable opinions of Ludwig and Helmholtz, recorded by their pupil Frithiof Holmgren, to the present age, one would for example expect everyone of the large busy brotherhood of physiologists to turn out discoveries. But is this so? The question is merely rhetorical, of course. Today there is a much shorter period of skimming the cream off a new technique than there was in the 1860s. It’s not uncommon to find that those workers, who depend very largely on a specific technical innovation, soon becomes sterile even though they themselves may have had an honourable share in the development of the technique we are using. Those who start with a problem and develop the technique for solving it can in the long run look forward to better prospects. As an example, one might take Erlanger and Gasser’s use of the new born cathode-ray to measure conduction velocities of the component fibres of nerve trunks. On the basis of W. Thompson’s formula for electric cable conduction, Göthlin of Uppsala had made a calculation in 1907, leading to the theory that conduction velocity in thick nerve fibres would be greater than in thin ones. Some 15 years later, Erlanger and Gasser, realising that amplification made it possible to use the inertia-less cathode-ray for tackling this question, took the trouble to overcome the deficiencies with which the early cathode-rays tubes were afflicted. And, as we all know, solved the problem of conduction velocity in nerve fibres of different diameter. This is an interesting example of a rather common type of discovery, the one in which it is realised that the outset, that something definite can be discovered, provided that the required technical solution can be managed. It presupposes that the experimenter knows how to formulate a well defined question and realises what kind of obstacles prevented earlier workers from answering it. In the case of Erlanger and Gasser, the basic results would hardly be called unexpected. Nevertheless, most neurophysiologists are willing to classify the result as an important discovery. Some perhaps merely because it’s had far reaching consequences in physiological experimentation. I do so with a further motivation, many things can be predicted with a fair degree of probability. And in all good laboratories, a number of such predictions, some passing fancies, others quite significant are floating about. My respect and admiration goes to the people who reformulate such notions into experimental propositions and do the hard work required for testing them. The sterilising effect of a technique stabilised into a routine was briefly alluded to a moment ago. What then happens is that those well up in the routine easily turn into great producers of small things. Of course rejuvenation is possible. A good example is a technique of tissue culture which for a long time was in that particular state of aimless delivery but has since recovered its significance. In my own field of neurophysiology I see that it’s a technique of evoked mass potentials is balancing on a rather thin edge of functional relevance. All the time running the risk of becoming merely an accessory to anatomy. While this itself is a respectable science, physiology could have different aims in order to remain respectable within its own sphere. There should not be too many people within a field, who care merely for the technical resolvable and not for what is worth solving. However, this tempting subject cannot be pursued now. Most workers, as they grow older, realise that some kind of borderline exists between those who are interested in a technique as an instrument for producing papers justifying grants, and those who see it as a possible way of furthering long range projects. in which one is not constrained to resort to happy coincidences and fancies.” I have translated that myself. We let basic attitude to a life in the field of science. There is no alternative available than to try and realise some fundamental ideas about biological structures and their functions. That is to promote understanding. Gradually understanding will ripen into insight. It cannot be denied that for some time happy coincidence and fancies may have a value that they otherwise would not possess. When fresh possibilities are opened up by a new technique. But will this inspiration last into ones old age? I dare say Helmholtz was right when he advocated working from a basis of understanding. This attitude towards scientific work has the advantage of permitting the experimenters to devote themselves quietly to their labours, without filling various journals with preliminary notes to obtain minor priorities. The disadvantages of course, the practical difficulty of persuading various foundations and research councils that they are workings of some importance in a world such as ours is at present. The judgement required to appreciate the mode of progress I am advocating may not always be at hand. There’s a well-known example in John Fulton’s biography of Harvey Cushing, the great neurosurgeon, the late neurosurgeon also, that after a visit to Sherrington in Liverpool in 1901 Cushing wrote in his diary: but that his predecessors have done them all so poorly before.” Sherrington, as many of us know, had a good long range program and Cushing was no fool. One can only conclude that this can be very difficult to make others even understand the aims of long range programs, much less to support them. There are so many instances of discoveries having led to major advance that one is compelled to ask whether it is at all possible to make a really important contribution to experimental biology without the support of a striking discovery. Sherrington’s life and work throw light on this question. Most neurophysiologists would not hesitate to call him one of the leading pioneers in their field. Yet he never made any discovery. In a systematic and skilful way, he made use of known reflex types to illustrate his ideas on synaptic action as spinal cord functions. Reciprocal innovation had been known before, Sherrington took it up. The cerebral fragility had been described, many other reflexes were known, inhibition had been discovered, spinal shock was familiar, this by the group around Goltz in Strasbourg. And the other problem of muscular reception had been formulated. What Sherrington did was to supply the necessary element of understanding, not of course by sitting at his writing desk, but by active experimentation around a set of gradually ripening ideas which he corrected and improved in that manner. This went on for years, a lifetime to be precise. Ultimately a degree of conceptual clarity was reached in his definition of synaptic excitation and inhibition that could serve as a basis for the development that has taken place in the last 30 years. His concepts are still with us, now fully incorporated in our present approach to these problems. The insights Sherrington ultimately reached can of course be called a discovery, but to do so is contrary to usage. Within the experimental sciences, the term discovery is not applied to theories acquired in this manner, even though the experimenter himself may feel that he has had his moments of insight coming like flashes of discovery after some time of experimentation. Another example illustrating a slow ripening of fundamental insight is provided by Darwin’s life and labours. Back in England, after the long cruise in the Beagle, he went to work and then writes: and without any theory collected facts on a wholesale scale, more especially with respect to domesticated productions by printed inquiries with conversation with skilful breeders and gardeners and by extensive reading. I soon perceived that selection was the key stone of man’s success in making useful races of animals and plants. But how selection could be applied to organisms living in a state of nature, remained for some time a mystery to me”. Malthus’ essay on population, a book that is still quite readable, then gave him a theory by which to work. Because he says he was well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence, which would tend to preserve favourable variations and tend to destroy unfavourable ones. Darwin described flashes of insight in his work as all scientists would do, but essentially it was 20 years of hard labour scrutinising the evidence for his thoughts that in the end brought clarity. In 1858 he published a preliminary note together with Wallace, who had independently arrived at similar conclusions. In 1859 appeared his origin of species, the idea of evolution was by no means new. His granddaughter Nora Barlow emphasises that to Charles Darwin it was the body of evidence supporting evolutionary theory that mattered and that, she knew, was his own contribution. With some justification one can say that today the long narrow and winding road to real knowledge has become harder to follow. In the face of innumerable distractions it has become difficult for the individual worker to preserve his identity. This, however, is necessary if he intends to grow and ripen with any branch of science. The point I want to make is that what we read, what we actively remember and what we ourselves contribute to our field of interest very gradually build up living and creative structure within us. We do not know how the brain does it, no more than we know how the world of sight gradually becomes upright again and for a while we have been carrying inverting spectacles. Our knowledge of the workings of our mind is of the scantiest. We simply have to admit that the brain is designed that way. By keeping track of one’s identity, I mean cultivating the talents or listening to the workings of ones own mind, separating minor diversions from main lines of thought and gratefully accepting what the secret process of automatic creation delivers, I can well understand that many people do not think much of this notion and prefer to regard it as one of my personal idiosyncrasies. Others who late in life look over their own activities are sure to find at least something that looks like a main line of personal identity in the choice of their labours. Up to this point many colleagues are perhaps willing to agree but a little more than that is meant when I maintain that an active brain is self fertile in the manner described. I'm convinced that if one can take care of one’s identity, it in turn will take care of one’s scientific development. I am emphasising all this so strongly because there are today so many distractions preventing scientists from enjoying the quietude and balance required for contact with their own creative life. The cities and the universities are becoming more restless. The organisation men who meddle with paperwork or questionnaires or regulations tend to increase in numbers while the number of teachers relative to students decreases. These developments tend to breed a clientele of anti-scientific undergraduates, demanding more and more of universities and less and less of themselves. The research worker has been drawn into separate research institutes, furthering the deterioration of standards in teaching and intellectual idealism in the faculties of our ancient sites of learning. Science does indeed need a number of pure research institutes, but university faculties are left to themselves and engage wholly in teaching, can hardly be called universities. These should be capable of living up to the true idea of universities in the sense that it was once defined by Cardinal Newman in his well-known book. In all creative work there is a good deal of time for exercising the talents of listening to oneself, often more profitable than listening to others or at any rate an important supplement to the life of symposia and congresses. Perhaps this lesser kind of life is also overdone in the present age. There are so many of these meetings nowadays that people can keep on drifting around the world and soon be pumped dry or it is easier to empty then to refill. My plea for a measure of selfcontact is really that of the poet and essayist Abraham Cowley, 1618 - 1687, who said that the Prime Minister had not as much to attend to in the way of public affairs as a wise man has in his solitude. There are those who experience nothing when trying to listen to themselves, this need not always indicates congenital defects. They may have been badly trained or may have been too lazy to absorb the knowledge and experiences that the brain needs for doing its part of the job. Against this background one can raise the question of whether all creative originality and science is necessarily inborn or whether there also exists an acquired variety of this valuable property. I suppose that most people share my view, the great originality in creative work is part of immense inheritance. But it is also half essential of scientific activity, I have had the opportunity to observe the development of many contemporary as well as of younger colleagues. I feel that the perusal of these experiences, without mentioning any names, might suggest an answer to this question, or at least provide an opinion. It seems then that some of those who as young men did not show much promise of originality, although quite capable of the necessary intellectual effort, later have given original contributions to our science. How should this observation be interpreted? Obviously I may have been mistaken. On the other hand, one does not often make mistakes about real originality quite apart from the fact that real originality often exists upon being recognised. I do not believe that the category of people of whom I'm now speaking were wrongly assessed at an earlier date. Rather it is by conviction that these are the very people who without difficulties having managed to explore their own mental resources. So as to make profitable use of them. They have had the capacity for listening quietly to their own minds and to the good advice of others and in this way have grown, blossomed and born fruit. These conclusions will become more evident if one considers progress within any individual branch of science. It is well known that in each phase of development the same ideas turn up in many laboratories of the scientifically active world. It’s hardly necessary to add examples as two good ones have already been provided, Holmgren and McKendrick on the one hand and Darwin and Wallace on the other. Even Newton himself said that he had stood on the shoulders of a giant. At the time when I regularly followed the scrutiny of proposal for Nobel prizes, there were many opportunities to observe independent but overlapping discoveries as the basis of proposals from different sources. This is by no means surprising, why should not well trained people who have read much the same lots of papers and monographs come to similar conclusions about the next step in a logical sequence. Since it is often difficult to foresee what each step implies for subsequent steps. Parallel conclusions may in a number of incidents lead to quite original contributions based merely on knowledge and perseverance. In the last instance, the front line of research is created by minds who’s combined effort more or less perfectly represents the inner logical characteristic of a particular period. Many professional scientists have good intuitive contact with a broad line of this development. This is expressed in the saying that something reflects the characteristic note of the age, the original part of what is called originality is a capacity for understanding, intuitively as well as logically, what is an important step forward, within any specific branch or science. A creative scientist has more numerous, better developed and more precise contacts with the characteristic note of his age and can therefore, unless some perseverance do not fail him, make greater contributions than others. I think I said enough in defence of my thesis that acquired originality exists. Such acquisition requires intense work, preferably within one particular sphere of problems, and obviously enough talent to support a reasonable rate of intake. I have always believed that in most cases people have enough talent for handling research, at least when working with a team. And that failure should be accounted for by other factors which I need not enumerate in this connection. All this implies that in the present era our rapid communication by many channels the individual scientist has but a share in the process of scientific discovery and understanding. Even if he abandons his field of research its development will continue though perhaps in a slightly different way or at a slower pace. From this standpoint it is possible to contemplate the disturbing and often pathological quarrels concerned with the ownership of ideas. Ideas, notions and suggestions are often thrown out in passing at meetings or in laboratory discussions and may sometimes fall on fertile ground, who then is the owner? The one who made the suggestion may or may not have intended to make anything out of it. Again I maintain that the only definable ownership belongs to the man who develops the idea experimentally or propounds it as a definite and well formulated hypothesis, capable of being tested. Fights about priorities are never less violent when there is a discovery at stake. This is well known and if I mention such matters briefly, it is merely to point out the dangers of too much emphasis on the need for making a discovery and to contrast it against the more peaceful life for development of understanding, without looking at discovery and what it may bring in its trail in the way of specific rewards. I began by comparing the efforts of young men with those of men old enough not to be called young. And by trying to show with the aid of two famous examples that it is by no means necessary to make any discoveries at all to do extremely well in science. It’s not my intention to undervalue discoveries but only to emphasise that it’s really understanding that scientists are after, even when they’re making discoveries. These are or can be of little interest, as long as they are mere facts. They have to be understood at least in a general way. Such understanding implies placing them into a structural hole while they illuminate the relevant step forward or solidify known ideas within it. Since understanding or insight is the real goal of our labours, why make so much noise about discoveries? Why indeed? Perhaps because they provide instantaneous excitement, releasing the Eureka, who’s echoe we hear reflected across the centuries. And because they offer the immediate awards found in the appreciation of colleagues, laymen and donors. The alternative, the slow development of a world of conceptual understanding in a manner of a Darwin or a Sherrington is of course far more difficult to follow. If it is worth a great deal to have some good ideas when one wants to make a discovery, then it is an absolute necessity to have them, if one intends to take the long road who’s ultimate goal is to reveal fundamental principles guiding the development of knowledge within any field. This second variant of scientific endeavour doesn’t always suit the impatient passion of the young, ruled by an ambition who craves immediate satisfaction. But a little later in life it provides feelings of assurance and satisfaction in one’s work. The pleasure of living to see a synthesis mature after years of labour helps the worker to maintain a more generous attitude towards the results of others. And also to mention more freely the names of colleagues who’s findings have contributed to the understanding ultimately achieved. Work becomes less competitive and the atmosphere of a laboratory friendlier. Such an attitude is particularly valuable in research institutes where people have to defend themselves, by delivering results and have no chance of escaping into teaching or administration. The long range program protects the individual worker and fosters insight of the kind that makes disputes about intellectual ownership meaningless. Thank you.

Vor einiger Zeit wurde ich gebeten, einen einführenden Artikel für die Annual Review of Physiology zu schreiben. Während ich mich mit der Anforderung abmühte, etwas von allgemeinem Interesse beizutragen, erinnerte ich mich an die Stimmung, in der ich den Frühlingsanfang des Jahres 1941 verbracht hatte. Nach einem Fahrradunfall, bei dem ich mir ein Knie zerschmetterte, konnte ich mit Ausruhen allein meine Zeit nicht ausfüllen. Außerdem hatte die Ruhe zur Folge, dass ich verstärkt den Zwang empfand, auf rein passives Aufnehmen beschränkt zu sein, während mein Schaffensdrang die ganze Zeit über nach Befreiung in Form irgendeiner produktiven Leistung verlangte. In dieser misslichen Lage rief ich mir eine meiner frühen Vorlesungen ins Gedächtnis, die ich unter dem Titel Und dies brachte mich auf die Idee, eine Sammlung von Essays in schwedischer Sprache zu verfassen: Sie wurde im Herbst 1941 veröffentlicht. Mein Buch erschien wenige Jahre früher als Walter Cannons „The Way of an Investigator“. Als sein Werk erschien, verschlang ich es begierig und fand Seitdem ist sehr viel mehr über dieses Thema geschrieben worden, systematischere und besser dokumentierte Bücher, die den gesamten Bereich umfassend behandeln. Daher empfand ich eine gewisse Besorgnis, als ich mir mein eigenes Buch noch einmal vornahm. Als ich es erneut las und darüber nachdachte, stellte ich in der Tat fest, dass es von einem Mann geschrieben worden war, der jünger als mein derzeitiges Selbst war, und für einen jüngeren Mann, der von der Begeisterung beflügelt war, sein Leben der Wissenschaft zu widmen. Der Tutor, der nur ein wenig älter als seine Zuhörer ist, spricht zu diesen darüber, Minerva zu umwerben; er erzählt ihnen von ihrer scheinbaren Launenhaftigkeit und von der tatsächlichen Strenge und Ernsthaftigkeit ihrer Ansichten, von ihren Ambitionen, ihrem Erfolg und von vielem mehr. Dabei vergisst er nicht zu erwähnen, wie strahlend ihr Lächeln bei den seltenen Gelegenheiten ist, bei denen sie es verschenkt. Nun, 30 Jahre später, wende ich mich diesen Dingen mit einer gewissen Distanziertheit wieder zu. Viele Menschen sehen Distanziertheit als eine große Tugend an, doch möglicherweise ist diese Geisteshaltung einer wissenschaftlichen Kreativität von jener Art, die dem jungen Autor der Minerva das Leben selbst war, nicht förderlich. Leidenschaft ist ein besserer Begriff, um diese Einstellung zu beschreiben. Junge Menschen sind darauf aus, selbst Entdeckungen zu machen, etwas zu sehen, das andere zuvor nicht gesehen haben. Sie mögen sich mit einem Minimum an Analyse begnügen, denn hinter der nächsten Wegbiegung gibt es immer etwas, das man sich anschauen muss – vielleicht etwas Neues und ziemlich Unerwartetes, etwas Aufregendes und Wichtiges. In jedem Fall stellt dies eine Versuchung dar, der man nur schwer widerstehen kann. Im späteren Leben verspürt man vielleicht weniger diesen Zwang, etwas zu entdecken, sondern versucht lieber, die Wege der Natur in einem größeren Zusammenhang ein wenig verstehen zu lernen. Dann kommt Distanziertheit gelegen. Man erkennt, dass sie eine Tugend ist – die Tugend jener, die abwägen und urteilen müssen. In dieser Geisteshaltung habe ich beschlossen, einige Überlegungen zu „Entdeckung“ und „Verständnis“ mitzuteilen. Ich werde mich dabei größtenteils auf das Gebiet der experimentellen Biologie beschränken. Unter „Entdeckung“ verstehen wir in erster Linie ein neues, durch Experimente gewonnenes Resultat. In einem banaleren Sinn sind die meisten Resultate schon deshalb neu, da sie immer irgendeine Art von Wissen vermitteln. In der Praxis neige ich dazu, wenn ich einen wissenschaftlichen Aufsatz lese, mich zu fragen: und eine Entdeckung neigt dazu, die aus Dogmen bestehenden Schutzdächer um einen etablierten Standpunkt herum zu durchbrechen, ebenso, wie ein Bombardierung mit schweren Teilchen dazu tendiert, den Kern eines Atoms zu sprengen. Bei diesem Typ von Entdeckungen gibt es ein Element des Unerwarteten. Eines der bekanntesten Beispiele ist Röntgens Entdeckung der Strahlen, die in vielen Sprachen nach ihm benannt sind. Diese Entdeckung kam überraschend für ihn und den Rest der wissenschaftlichen Welt. Es gibt einen zweiten Typ von Entdeckungen, der von ebenso grundlegender Bedeutung ist: die Lieferung von auf Experimenten beruhenden Beweisen für einen wissenschaftlichen Standpunkt, der als wahrscheinlich gilt, aber noch nicht bewiesen ist, da nach der bestehenden Beweislage alternative Möglichkeiten noch nicht ausgeschlossen werden können. Ein Beispiel hierfür ist die Theorie der chemischen Übertragung und der Synapsen, der Nervenenden. Diese Theorie wurde 1905 von T.R. Elliot aufgestellt, aber erst sehr viel später von Otto Loewi und Henry Dale bewiesen. Dies ist der häufigste Typ von Entdeckungen – die beweisgestützte Bestätigung einer bestimmten Theorie unter mehreren alternativen Hypothesen. Jeder dieser beiden Typen von Entdeckungen muss, um diesem Begriff gerecht zu werden, weitreichende Konsequenzen haben, wie sie die angeführten Beispiele nun in der Tat gehabt haben. Solange dieses Kriterium nicht erfüllt ist, sind wir nicht bereit, den großartigen Begriff „Entdeckung“ zu verwenden, statt bescheiden nur von einem neuen Ergebnis zu sprechen, das von Fall zu Fall mehr oder weniger interessant sein mag. In manchen Fällen versteht der Experimentator vielleicht nicht, was er gesehen hat, obwohl er begreift, dass es sich um etwas ziemlich Neues und möglicherweise sehr Wichtiges handelt. Als beispielsweise Frithjof Holmgren 1865 eine Elektrode auf der Hornhaut des Auges und eine andere Elektrode auf dem angeschnittenen Ende des Sehnervs eines Frosches anbrachte, zeichnete er eine Reaktion auf den Beginn und das Empfinden von Lichteinfall auf. Er hielt dies für eine Du Bois-Reymondsche negative Schwankung, also die Aktionsströme der Nervenfasern des Sehnervs. Nach diesen hatte er gesucht und daher erwartet, sie zu finden. Sechs Jahre später begann Holmgren seine Elektroden um den Augapfel herum zu verschieben, und erkannte bald, dass es die Klarheit der Verteilung, die er festgestellt hatte, verlangte, dass die Reaktion in der Netzhaut selbst ihren Ursprung hatte. Unabhängig davon gelang Dewar und McKendrick die Wiederentdeckung des Elektroretinogramms – basierend auf der ebenso falschen Annahme, dass die Netzhaut die fotoelektrischen Effekte zeigen sollte, die zu dieser Zeit gerade von Willoughby Smith entdeckt worden waren. In beiden Fällen stellte das Elektroretinogramm das unerwartete Resultat von etwas Erwartetem dar. Es war eine bedeutende Entdeckung, der erste Beweis für einen durch die Stimulierung eines Sinnesorgans hervorgerufenen elektrochemischen Prozess; der Beweis dafür, dass etwas Objektives einen physikalisch definierten Stimulus mit einer sinnlichen Wahrnehmung verband. Ganz richtig betitelte Holmgren seinen ersten übersetzten Aufsatz mit Dieses Ergebnis erfüllte außerdem das Kriterium, dass eine Entdeckung weitreichende Konsequenzen haben sollte. Ich selbst habe mich mit dreien davon beschäftigt: mit der Entdeckung einer Lichthemmung in der Netzhaut, mit dem Nachweis, dass ein wichtiger Bestandteil der Anpassung an Licht und Dunkel elektrischen Ursprungs und nicht nur auf die Fotopigmente zurückzuführen ist, und mit der Weiterentwicklung der Theorie, dass generierte Potenziale sensorischen Nerven zu einer Entladung stimulieren. Jene, die auf diesem Gebiet weitergearbeitet haben, könnten die Liste leicht erweitern, wenn zusätzliche Beweise für die Wichtigkeit dieser Entdeckung benötigt würden. Ziemlich interessant ist die Latenzzeit zwischen der Entdeckung des Elektroretino-gramms und einem grundlegenden Verständnis seiner Bedeutung. Im gegenwärtigen Kontext dient die Latenz dazu, deutlich zu machen, dass Entdeckung und Verständnis tatsächlich unterschiedliche Konzepte sind und nicht willkürlich voneinander differenziert werden. Die Entdeckung zeichnet sich durch eine Einmaligkeit aus, die an einen bestimmten Zeitpunkt geknüpft ist, wohingegen das Verständnis beständig von einer zur nächsten Ebene der Erforschung und Einsicht voranschreitet und somit ein Prozess ist, der viele Jahre, in manchen Fällen das ganze Leben des Entdeckers über andauert. Der junge Wissenschaftler teilt mit dem Laien anscheinend häufig die Ansicht, dass der wissenschaftliche Fortschritt einer langen Perlenschnur gleicht, die aus hell leuchtenden Entdeckungen besteht. Dieser Standpunkt spiegelt sich im Testament Alfred Nobels wider, dessen Geist, wie wir hören, der eines Erfinders und voller guter Ideen für die Anwendung war. Dies sind prädisponierte definierbare Entdeckungen. Im Folgenden zitiere ich seine eigenen Formulierungen aus seinem Testament: Die wichtigste Entdeckung oder Erfindung auf dem Feld der Physik. Die wichtigste Entdeckung auf dem Gebiet der Physiologie oder Medizin. Die wichtigste chemische Entdeckung oder Verbesserung. Nur im Bereich der Chemie, von dem er als ein Erfinder rauchlosen Pulvers und Dynamits Erfahrungen aus erster Hand besaß, gestattete er die Verleihung des Nobelpreises auch für eine Verbesserung. Es ist allgemein bekannt, dass einer seiner wichtigsten Beiträge zur Erfindung des Dynamits dem Wesen nach eine Verbesserung war. Er sorgte dafür, dass die Verwendung von Dynamit nahezu narrensicher wurde, indem er Kieselgur zu dem ursprünglichen Sprengöl hinzufügte, das sich in der Praxis als so gefährlich erwiesen hatte. Diese Feststellung verhalf ihm zu der Erkenntnis, dass manche Erfindungen und Entdeckungen verbessert werden müssen, bevor ihre Bedeutsamkeit sich erweisen kann. Man sollte sich vorsichtig seinen Weg durch diese subtilen Unterscheidungen bahnen. Mir fallen Nobelpreise im Bereich der Chemie ein, die für Verbesserungen vergeben wurden. Aber ich erinnere mich nicht daran, in 30 Jahren von Preisvergabeabstimmungen der jeweiligen Akademie jemals von einem Vorschlag gehört zu haben, der durch diesen Begriff legitimiert wurde. Die Betonung oder eher die Überbetonung der Entdeckung als des eigentlichen Ziels wissenschaftlicher Bemühungen ist leicht nachzuvollziehen. Laut der hier verwendeten Definition hat eine Entdeckung bedeutende Konsequenzen und initiiert eine neue Linie der wissenschaftlichen Entwicklung. Sie erregt Aufmerksamkeit und wird gegenwärtig von vielen Zeitschriften, die sich der Popularisierung der Wissenschaft verschrieben haben, und manchmal sogar von Tageszeitungen ins Rampenlicht gedrängt. Während meiner Jugend machte unser Philosoph an der Universität Lund, Hans Larsson, der, wie ich glaube, nur auf Schwedisch schrieb, großen Eindruck auf uns. Ich erinnere mich an eine seiner Thesen, welche besagte, dass wir in unserem Denken versuchen, einen Punkt zu erreichen, von dem aus wir einen umfassenden Überblick haben. Eine Entdeckung wird in der Wissenschaft häufig als eben ein solcher Aussichtspunkt betrachtet. Es mag vorkommen, dass der Entdecker selbst nicht immer die Spitze seines eigenen Turms ersteigt, andere beeilen sich, diesen Punkt zu erreichen, und überholen ihn. Am Ende befinden sich viele auf der Spitze und die meisten von ihnen versuchen, mehr oder weniger dasselbe zu tun. Der Entdecker selbst sollte entschuldigt werden, wenn er von dem Wunsch getrieben wird, eine friedliche Zuflucht zu finden, wo er sich mit etwas anderem beschäftigen und in aller Ruhe einen neuen Beobachtungsposten errichten kann. Eine systematische Klassifikation der Typen von Entdeckungen kann hier nicht unternommen werden, aber einige Bemerkungen sind angebracht. Da gibt es beispielsweise die Entdeckungen, die auf der Welle des technischen Fortschritts reiten. Damals, gegen Ende des letzten Jahrhunderts, wurde die elektrische Stimulation von Nerven möglich. Damit wurde auch die Entdeckung verschiedener neuer und wichtiger Mechanismen der Steuerung der Nerven ermöglicht. Es verwundert daher nicht, dass der deutsche Physiologe Carl Ludwig seinen Schülern mitgab: Helmholtz war ebenso optimistisch, als er in seiner Eigenschaft als Professor für Physiologie in Heidelberg sagte, dass es nur nötig sei, einen tiefen Spatenstich zu tun, um etwas Neues und Interessantes zu finden. Wenn wir diese liebenswürdigen Meinungen von Ludwig und Helmholtz, die von ihrem Schüler Frithjof Holmgren aufgezeichnet wurden, auf die Gegenwart übertragen, würde man doch erwarten, dass beispielsweise jeder aus der großen und geschäftigen Bruderschaft der Neurophysiologen immer wieder Entdeckungen liefert. Aber ist dies der Fall? Die Frage ist selbstverständlich eine rein rhetorische. Heutzutage ist die Zeit, die man hat, um die „Sahne“ einer neuen Technik abzuschöpfen, sehr viel kürzer als in den 1860er Jahren. Nicht selten stellt man fest, dass diejenigen Forscher, die in hohem Maße von einer bestimmten technischen Innovation abhängig sind, sehr schnell unproduktiv werden, obwohl sie möglicherweise selbst einen ehrenvollen Anteil an der Entwicklung der von ihnen verwendeten Technik gehabt haben. Jene, die mit einem Problem beginnen und deshalb die Technik entwickeln, um dieses Problem zu lösen, haben langfristig bessere Aussichten. Als Beispiel mag hier Erlangers und Gassers Verwendung des neuentdeckten Kathodenstrahls dienen, um die Nervenleitungsgeschwindigkeit der einzelnen Fasern von Nervenstämmen zu messen. Auf Grundlage der von W. Thompson entwickelten Formel für die Leitung elektrischer Kabel stellte Göthlin aus Uppsala 1907 eine Berechnung an, die zu der Theorie führte, dass die Leitungsgeschwindigkeit in dicken Nervenfasern größer sein würde als in dünnen Nervenfasern. Ungefähr 15 Jahre später erkannten Erlanger und Gasser, dass die Amplifikation es ermöglichte, den trägheitslosen Kathodenstrahl bei der Behandlung dieser Frage einzusetzen, und nahmen die Mühe auf sich, die Unzulänglichkeiten, mit denen die frühen Kathodenstrahlröhren behaftet waren, zu überwinden. Und damit lösten sie, wie wir alle wissen, das Problem der Leitungsgeschwindigkeit in Nervenfasern von unterschiedlichem Durchmesser. Dies ist ein interessantes Beispiel für einen ziemlich häufig anzutreffenden Entdeckungstyp – jenen Typ, bei dem zu Beginn erkannt wird, dass es, sofern einem die erforderliche technische Lösung gelingt, etwas Definitives und Sicheres zu entdecken gibt. Voraussetzung ist, dass der Experimentator weiß, wie man eine wohldefinierte Fragestellung formuliert, und dass er erkennt, welche Hindernisse früheren Forschern bei der Beantwortung dieser Frage im Wege standen. Im Fall von Erlanger und Gasser können die grundlegenden Ergebnisse kaum als unerwartet bezeichnet werden. Dennoch würde die Mehrzahl der Neurophysiologen das Ergebnis bereitwillig als eine wichtige Entdeckung einstufen. Einige würden dies vielleicht allein deshalb tun, weil dieses Ergebnis weitreichende Konsequenzen auf dem Gebiet der physiologischen Experimente hatte. Ich tue dies aus einem weiteren Grund: Vieles lässt sich mit einem recht hohen Grad von Wahrscheinlichkeit vorhersagen, und in allen guten Laboren sind mehrere dieser Vorhersagen im Umlauf. Einige von ihnen sind unrealistisch, andere jedoch von erheblicher Bedeutung. Mein Respekt und meine Bewunderung gelten den Personen, die diese Ideen zu Aussagen umformulieren, die anhand von Experimenten überprüfbar sind, und die die mühsame Arbeit auf sich nehmen, die nötig ist, um diese Aussagen zu testen. Auf den die Kreativität dämpfenden Effekt einer Technik, die zu einer festen Routine geworden ist, habe ich soeben kurz hingewiesen. Wenn dies passiert ist, geschieht Folgendes: Diejenigen, die mit dieser Routine gut vertraut sind, werden zu großen Produzenten kleiner Dinge. Selbstverständlich ist eine Revitalisierung möglich. Hierfür ist die Technik der Gewebekultur ein gutes Beispiel. Lange Zeit befand sie sich in jenem speziellen Zustand der ziellosen Lieferung von Daten, doch seitdem hat sie ihre Bedeutung wiedererlangt. In meinem Gebiet der Neurophysiologie sehe ich, dass eine Technik der evozierten Massenpotenziale auf einer ziemlich schmalen Kante funktionaler Relevanz balanciert. Dabei läuft sie die ganze Zeit über Gefahr, zu einer reinen Erfüllungsgehilfin der Anatomie zu werden. Obwohl diese an sich eine respektable Wissenschaft ist, könnte die Physiologie andere Ziele haben, um in ihrer eigenen Sphäre respektabel zu bleiben. In einem Fachgebiet sollten nicht zu viele Menschen arbeiten, denen es nur um das geht, was technisch lösbar ist, und nicht um das, was zu lösen sich lohnt. Wie dem auch sei – auf dieses verlockende Thema kann hier und jetzt nicht weiter eingegangen werden. Die meisten Forscher stellen, wenn sie älter werden, fest, dass es eine Art Grenze gibt zwischen jenen, die sich für eine Technik als ein Instrument zur Produktion von wissenschaftlichen Aufsätzen und damit zur Rechtfertigung von Zuschüssen interessieren, und jenen, die eine Technik als eine Möglichkeit sehen, um langfristige Projekte voranzubringen. In seinem Buch „Vorträge und Reden“ sagt Helmholtz: in denen man sich nicht auf günstige Zufälle und Einfälle verlassen muss, immer angenehmer gewesen sind.“ Ich habe dies selbst übersetzt. Wir lassen eine Grundeinstellung zu einem Leben im Bereich der Wissenschaft. Es gibt keine Alternative dazu, grundlegende Ideen zu biologischen Strukturen und ihren Funktionen zu begreifen zu versuchen – das bedeutet, Verständnis zu fördern. Nach und nach wird Verständnis zu Erkenntnis heranreifen. Man kann nicht bestreiten, dass glückliche Zufälle und Einfälle manchmal einen Wert haben können, den sie sonst nicht besitzen. Dies ist dann der Fall, wenn sich durch eine neue Technik neue Möglichkeiten eröffnen. Doch wird diese Inspiration ausreichen, bis man ein hohes Alter reicht hat? Ich wage zu behaupten, dass Helmholtz zu Recht dafür plädierte, in der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit von einer Basis des Verständnisses auszugehen. Eine solche Einstellung zum wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten hat den Vorteil, dass sie den Experimentatoren erlaubt, sich in Ruhe ihrer Arbeit zu widmen, ohne zahlreiche Zeitschriften mit vorbereitenden Bemerkungen anzufüllen, um unwesentliche Vorteile zu erlangen. Selbstverständlich gibt es auch Nachteile: die praktische Schwierigkeit, verschiedene Stiftungen und Forschungsräte davon zu überzeugen, dass die eigenen Arbeiten in einer Welt wie der unseren zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt von entsprechender Bedeutung sind. Das Urteilsvermögen, welches erforderlich ist, um das von mir befürwortete Fortschrittsmodell wertzuschätzen, ist vielleicht nicht immer vorhanden. Ein wohlbekanntes Beispiel findet sich in John Fultons Biografie des bedeutenden verstorbenen Neurochirurgen Harvey Cushing. Er berichtet, dass Cushing nach einem Besuch bei Sherrington in Liverpool im Jahre 1901 in sein Tagebuch schrieb: weil er besonders großartige Leistungen vollbracht hat, sondern weil die Leistungen seine Vorgänger ebenso wenig überragend waren.“ Wie viele von uns wissen, hatte Sherrington ein gutes Langzeit-Programm. Auch war Cushing kein Narr. Man kann also nur die Schlussfolgerung ziehen, dass es sehr schwierig sein kann, anderen die Ziele von Langzeit-Programmen auch nur begreiflich zu machen, geschweige denn, ihre Unterstützung dafür zu gewinnen. Es gibt so viele Fälle, in denen Entdeckungen zu einem wichtigen Fortschritt geführt haben, dass man fragen muss, ob es überhaupt möglich ist, ohne die Unterstützung einer herausragenden Entdeckung einen Beitrag von wirklicher Bedeutung zur experimentellen Biologie zu leisten. Sherringtons Leben und sein Werk werfen ein klärendes Licht auf diese Frage. Die meisten Neurophysiologen würden ihn ohne Zögern als einen der führenden Pioniere auf ihrem Gebiet bezeichnen. Dennoch machte er nie eine Entdeckung. Auf systematische und geschickte Art und Weise stützte er sich auf bekannte Reflextypen, um seine Vorstellungen von synaptischen Aktionen als Funktionen des Rückenmarks zu illustrieren. Die reziproke Innervation war bereits bekannt, und Sherrington nahm sie in seine Überlegungen auf. Die Fragilität des Gehirns war beschrieben worden, viele andere Reflexe waren bekannt, das Phänomen der Inhibition war entdeckt worden (von der Gruppe um Goltz in Straßburg), der Begriff des spinalen Schocks war geläufig. Das andere Problem der muskulären Reizaufnahme war ebenfalls formuliert worden. Was Sherrington gelang, war Folgendes: Er lieferte das notwendige Element des Verständnisses – selbstverständlich nicht, indem er an seinem Schreibtisch saß, sondern durch aktives Experimentieren, in dessen Zentrum ein Satz allmählich heranreifender Ideen stand, die er auf diese Art und Weise korrigierte und verbesserte. Dies dauerte Jahre, ein ganzes Leben lang, um genau zu sein. Schließlich wurde in seiner Definition der synaptischen Erregung und Hemmung ein Grad von begrifflicher Klarheit erreicht, der dann als Grundlage für die Entwicklung dienen konnte, die in den letzten 30 Jahren stattgefunden hat. Seine Konzepte besitzen heute noch Gültigkeit und sind nun vollständig in den Ansatz integriert, mit dem wir gegenwärtig diese Fragestellungen angehen. Die Erkenntnisse, zu denen Sherrington letztendlich gelangte, können selbstverständlich als Entdeckung bezeichnet werden, doch dies widerspricht der üblichen Verwendung des Begriffs. In den experimentellen Wissenschaften wird der Begriff „Entdeckung“ nicht für Theorien verwendet, die auf diese Weise gewonnen wurden, obwohl der Experimentator selbst das Gefühl gehabt haben mag, dass er Augenblicke blitzartiger Einsichten hatte, die ihm nach einiger Zeit des Experimentierens kamen. Darwins Leben und wissenschaftliche Arbeit liefern uns ein weiteres Beispiel für das langsame Heranreifen einer grundlegenden Erkenntnis. Nach seiner langen Kreuzfahrt auf der Beagle machte er sich bei seiner Rückkehr nach England an die Arbeit und schrieb dann: Ich arbeitete nach genuin Bacon’schen Prinzipien und sammelte ohne jegliche Theorie Fakten en masse, insbesondere bezüglich der Züchtung von Haustieren, und zwar anhand schriftlich fixierter Fragestellungen in Unterhaltungen mit versierten Züchtern und Gärtnern und anhand umfassender Lektüre. Bald erkannte ich, dass Selektion der Grundpfeiler für den Erfolg der Schaffung nützlicher Tier- und Pflanzenrassen durch den Menschen war. Wie jedoch die Selektion auf lebende Organismen in der Natur angewendet werden konnte, blieb einige Zeit ein Geheimnis für mich.“ Dann lieferte ihm Malthus’ Essay zur Theorie des Bevölkerungswachstums, ein auch heute noch recht lesenswertes Buch, eine Theorie, mit deren Hilfe er arbeiten konnte. Denn er sagt, dass er gut vorbereitet war, den Kampf ums Dasein zu verstehen, der dazu tendiert, günstige Variationen zu erhalten und ungünstige zu beseitigen. Wie alle Wissenschaftler schilderte Darwin Gedankenblitze, die er bei seiner Arbeit hatte, doch im Grunde waren es die 20 Jahre harter Arbeit, in denen er das Beweismaterial für seine Überlegungen untersuchte und prüfte, die letztendlich Klarheit brachten. eine Vorankündigung. Die Idee der Evolution war keinesfalls neu. Seine Enkelin Nora Barlow betont, dass es die Gesamtheit des Beweismaterials für die Theorie der Evolution war, was für Charles Darwin von Bedeutung war, und das, so wusste sie, war sein Beitrag. Man kann mit einigem Recht behaupten, dass es heute schwerer geworden ist, dem langen, schmalen und gewundenen Weg zu wirklichem Wissen zu folgen. Angesichts vielfältiger Ablenkungen ist es für den Forschenden schwierig geworden, seine Identität zu wahren. Dies ist jedoch in jedem Wissenschaftsbereich notwendig, wenn er mit ihm wachsen und reifen möchte. Worauf ich hinaus will, ist, dass das, was wir lesen, woran wir uns aktiv erinnern und was wir selbst zu unserem Interessensgebiet beitragen, alles nach und nach lebendige und kreative Strukturen in uns aufbaut. Wir wissen nicht, wie das Gehirn dies vollbringt, ebenso wenig, wie wir wissen, wie die Welt des Sehens allmählich wieder senkrecht wird, wenn wir eine Zeitlang invertierende Brillengläser getragen haben. Unser Wissen über die Funktionsweise unseres Gehirns ist äußerst unzureichend. Wir müssen schlicht zugeben, dass das Gehirn auf diese Art und Weise konzipiert ist. Wenn ich davon rede, die eigene Identität im Auge zu behalten, so meine ich damit, die Talente des eigenen Geistes zu kultivieren oder seiner Arbeit zu lauschen, unbedeutende Zerstreuungen von den Hauptgedankengängen zu trennen und dankbar das entgegenzunehmen, was der geheime Prozess der automatischen Schöpfung uns gibt. Ich kann gut nachvollziehen, dass viele Leute von dieser Vorstellung nicht viel halten und sie lieber als eine meiner persönlichen Eigenarten betrachten werden. Andere, die zu einem späten Zeitpunkt ihres Lebens auf ihre eigene Aktivitäten zurückblicken, finden mit Sicherheit zumindest etwas, das wie ein roter Faden persönlicher Identität bei der Wahl ihrer Aufgaben aussieht. Viele Kollegen sind vielleicht bereit, mir bis zu diesem Punkt zuzustimmen. Doch es ist noch etwas mehr gemeint, wenn ich behaupte, dass ein aktives Gehirn in der beschriebenen Art und Weise selbstbefruchtend ist. Ich bin davon überzeugt, dass man, wenn man sich um seine eigene Identität kümmern kann, sich diese um die eigene wissenschaftliche Entwicklung kümmern wird. Ich lege auf all dies so großen Wert, weil heute so viele Ablenkungen Wissenschaftler davon abhalten, die Ruhe und der Ausgeglichenheit zu genießen, die erforderlich sind, mit ihrer eigenen Kreativität in Kontakt zu kommen. Die Städte und die Universitäten werden rastloser. Die Zahl der Bürokraten, die sich mit Papierkram oder Fragebögen oder Verordnungen zu schaffen machen, nimmt zu, während das Zahlenverhältnis zwischen Lehrern und Studenten ungünstiger wird. Durch diese Entwicklungen wird eine Klientel anti-wissenschaftlicher Studenten geschaffen, die von den Universitäten immer mehr und von sich selbst immer weniger fordern. Der Forscher wird in separate Einrichtungen ausgelagert, was zu einem weiteren Verfall der Lehrstandards und des intellektuellen Idealismus an den Fakultäten unserer historischen Bildungsstätten führt. Zwar braucht die Wissenschaft in der Tat einige Einrichtungen, die ausschließlich der Forschung gewidmet sind. Universitäten, deren Fakultäten sich selbst überlassen werden und sich nur auf die Lehre konzentrieren, können jedoch kaum als Universitäten bezeichnet werden. Sie sollten in der Lage sein, der Idee von echten Universitäten, die einst von Kardinal Newman in seinem bekannten Buch definiert wurde, gerecht zu werden. Jede kreative Arbeit besteht zu einem guten Teil darin, die Fähigkeit des Auf-sich-selbst-Hörens auszuüben. Häufig ist dies nutzbringender, als auf andere zu hören. Auf jeden Fall ist es eine wichtige Ergänzung zur Teilnahme an Symposien und Kongressen. Es mag sein, dass dieses weniger bedeutsame Leben in der heutigen Zeit übertrieben wird. Heutzutage finden so viele dieser Zusammenkünfte statt, dass die Leute die ganze Zeit auf der Welt umher irren und bald leergepumpt sind: Es ist leichter, etwas zu leeren, als es zu füllen. Mein Plädoyer für ein gewisses Maß an Kontakt mit sich selbst ist eigentlich das Plädoyer des Dichters und Essayisten Abraham Cowley (1618 bis 1687), der behauptete, dass der Premierminister bezüglich öffentlicher Angelegenheiten weniger zu tun habe, als ein weiser Mann in seiner Abgeschiedenheit. Manche nehmen gar nichts wahr, wenn sie versuchen, auf sich selbst zu hören, wobei dies nicht immer ein Hinweis auf angeborene Fehler sein muss. Vielleicht wurden sie schlecht geschult oder waren zu faul, um das Wissen und die Erfahrungen aufzunehmen, die das Gehirn benötigt, um seinen Teil der Arbeit zu tun. Vor diesem Hintergrund kann man die Frage stellen, ob jegliche kreative Originalität und Wissenschaft notwendigerweise angeboren ist, oder ob es auch eine erworbene Variante dieser kostbaren Eigenschaft gibt. Ich gehe davon aus, dass die meisten Menschen meine Ansicht teilen: Große Originalität in kreativer Arbeit ist zum Teil auf ein riesiges Erbe zurückzuführen. Doch sie ist nur zur Hälfte wesentlich für die wissenschaftliche Tätigkeit. Ich hatte die Gelegenheit, die Entwicklung vieler sowohl gleichaltriger als auch jüngerer Kollegen zu beobachten. Meiner Meinung nach könnte die Durchsicht dieser Erfahrungen, ohne dabei einzelne Namen zu nennen, eine Antwort auf diese Frage nahelegen oder zumindest eine Stellungnahme dazu liefern. Es scheint, dass einige derjenigen, die als junge Männer scheinbar keine allzu große Originalität versprachen, obwohl sie zu der geforderten intellektuellen Leistung durchaus fähig waren, später originelle Beiträge zu unserer Wissenschaft lieferten. Wie sollte diese Beobachtung verstanden werden? Natürlich kann ich mich geirrt haben. Andererseits befindet man sich nur selten im Irrtum, wenn es um Originalität geht – ganz abgesehen davon, dass sich wahre Originalität häufig daraus ergibt, dass Leistungen als solche erkannt werden. Ich glaube nicht, dass die Personengruppe, von der ich hier rede, zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt falsch eingeschätzt wurde. Vielmehr bin ich davon überzeugt, dass es genau jene Menschen sind, denen es ohne Schwierigkeiten gelungen ist, ihre geistigen Ressourcen zu erschließen, um sie gewinnbringend zu nutzen. Sie verfügten über die Fähigkeit, ruhig auf ihren eigenen Geist und den guten Rat anderer zu hören, und auf diese Weise sind sie gewachsen, erblüht und haben Früchte getragen. Diese Schlussfolgerungen werden offenkundiger, wenn man den Fortschritt in jedem einzelnen Wissensgebiet betrachtet. Es ist allgemein bekannt, dass in jeder Phase der wissenschaftlichen Entwicklung in vielen Laboren der wissenschaftlich tätigen Welt dieselben Ideen auftauchen. Weitere Beispiele hierfür sind kaum erforderlich, da zwei gute Beispiele bereits genannt wurden – Holmgren und McKendrick auf der einen und Darwin und Wallace auf der anderen Seite. Selbst Newton sagte, dass er auf den Schultern eines Riesen gestanden habe. Es gab zu der Zeit, als ich regelmäßig die Überprüfung der Nobelpreisvorschläge verfolgte, viele Gelegenheiten, unabhängige, aber sich überschneidende Entdeckungen zu beobachten, die jeweils die Basis für Vorschläge unterschiedlicher Herkunft bildeten. Dies ist keinesfalls verwunderlich: Warum sollten gut ausgebildete Leute, die mehr oder weniger dieselben Artikel und Monografien gelesen haben, hinsichtlich des nächsten Schritts in einer logischen Abfolge nicht zu ähnlichen Schlüssen gelangen? Da die Implikationen jedes einzelnen Schritts für die nachfolgenden Schritte häufig nur schwer vorherzusehen sind, können parallele Schlussfolgerungen in einer Reihe von Fällen zu durchaus originellen Beiträgen führen, die allein auf Wissen und Beharrlichkeit basieren. In letzter Instanz wird die vorderste Front der Forschung vom Geist derjenigen bestimmt, deren vereinte Kräfte die inneren logischen Eigentümlichkeiten einer bestimmten Zeit mehr oder weniger vollständig repräsentieren. Viele professionelle Wissenschaftler haben zu einer breiten Linie dieser Entwicklung einen guten intuitiven Kontakt. Dies kommt in der Redensart zum Ausdruck, dass etwas den charakteristischen Ansatz einer Epoche wiedergibt. Der kreative Teil dessen, was man als Originalität bezeichnet, ist eine Fähigkeit, sowohl intuitiv als auch logisch dasjenige zu erfassen, was in einem bestimmten Fachgebiet oder einer bestimmten Wissenschaft einen wichtigen Schritt nach vorn bedeutet. Ein kreativer Wissenschaftler besitzt mehr, besser entwickelte und präzisere Kontakte zu den für seine Zeit charakteristischen gedanklichen Zusammenhängen und kann daher, solange es ihm nicht an Beharrlichkeit fehlt, bedeutsamere Beiträge leisten als andere. Ich glaube, ich habe genug zur Verteidigung meiner These gesagt, dass es so etwas wie „erworbene“ Originalität gibt. Ein solcher Erwerb erfordert intensive Arbeit, vorzugsweise innerhalb eines bestimmten Problemgebiets, und natürlich genug Talent, um eine angemessene Aufnahmegeschwindigkeit zu ermöglichen. Ich bin immer der Meinung gewesen, dass in den meisten Fällen die Leute genug Talent für die Forschung besitzen, zumindest wenn sie im Team arbeiten, und dass Misserfolg durch andere Faktoren erklärt werden sollte, die ich in diesem Zusammenhang nicht aufzählen muss. Dies alles bedeutet, dass der einzelne Wissenschaftler aufgrund der rasanten, über so viele verschiedene Kanäle erfolgenden Kommunikation gegenwärtig nur einen Teilbeitrag zum Prozess der wissenschaftlichen Entdeckung und des wissenschaftlichen Verständnisses leistet. Selbst wenn er seinem Forschungsgebiet den Rücken kehrt, wird die Entwicklung auf diesem Gebiet weiter voranschreiten, wenn auch vielleicht auf eine etwas andere Art und Weise oder in einem langsameren Tempo. Von diesem Standpunkt aus kann man über die höchst bedauerlichen und häufig krankhaften Streitereien über das Eigentumsrecht an bestimmten Ideen reflektieren. Häufig werden Ideen, Vorstellungen und Vorschläge en passant auf Zusammenkünften und im Laufe von Diskussionen im Labor in die Runde geworfen, und sie landen dann manchmal auf fruchtbarem Boden. Wer ist dann ihr Eigentümer? Derjenige, der den Vorschlag machte, hatte vielleicht die Absicht, ihn weiterzuentwickeln – oder auch nicht. Wiederum behaupte ich, dass die einzige genau bestimmbare Eigentümerschaft demjenigen zukommt, der die Idee mit Hilfe von Experimenten weiterentwickelt oder sie als präzise und wohlformulierte Hypothese vorbringt, die experimentell überprüft werden kann. Kämpfe um Prioritäten sind immer dann am heftigsten, wenn es um eine Entdeckung geht. Dies ist allgemein bekannt, und wenn ich dies hier kurz erwähne, dann nur, um auf die Gefahren hinzuweisen, die daraus erwachsen können, dass man die Erfordernis, eine Entdeckung zu machen, überbewertet und um dieser das friedlichere Leben der Weiterentwicklung von Verständnis und Einsicht gegenüberzustellen, ohne den Blick auf Entdeckungen und das, was sie in Form spezifischer Belohnungen vielleicht mit sich bringen. Ich begann mit einem Vergleich der Bemühungen junger Menschen mit den Bemühungen von Menschen, die alt genug sind, um nicht mehr als jung zu gelten, sowie mit dem Versuch, anhand von zwei berühmten Beispielen darzulegen, dass es keinesfalls erforderlich ist, überhaupt irgendwelche Entdeckungen zu machen, um in der Wissenschaft sehr gute Arbeit zu leisten. Es geht mir nicht darum, Entdeckungen gering einzuschätzen, sondern lediglich darum, zu betonen, dass es in Wirklichkeit Verständnis und Erkenntnis sind, nach denen Wissenschaftler streben – selbst dann, wenn sie Entdeckungen machen. Diese sind oder können nur von geringem Interesse sein, solange sie reine Fakten betreffen. Sie müssen zumindest auf eine allgemeine Art und Weise verstanden werden. Ein solches Verständnis bedeutet, dass diese Fakten in ein strukturelles Ganzes eingeordnet werden, während sie den nächsten wichtigen Schritt nach vorne beleuchten oder bereits bekannte Ideen innerhalb dieses Ganzen konkretisieren. Wenn nun Verständnis und Erkenntnis das eigentliche Ziel unserer Arbeit sind: Warum wird dann so viel Lärm um Entdeckungen gemacht? In der Tat: Warum? Vielleicht, weil sie für sofortige Aufregung und Begeisterung sorgen und jenes Heureka auslösen, dessen Echo wir über die Jahrhunderte hinweg hören. Und weil sie die unmittelbaren Belohnungen bieten, die in der Anerkennung von Seiten der Kollegen, Laien und Geldgeber bestehen. Selbstverständlich ist es sehr viel schwerer, den alternativen Weg einzuschlagen, die langsame Entwicklung einer Welt des theoretischen Verständnisses in der Art und Weise eines Darwin oder Sherrington. Wenn es ziemlich viel wert ist, gute Ideen zu haben, wenn man eine Entdeckung machen möchte, so ist ihr Besitz eine absolute Notwendigkeit, wenn man den langen Weg nehmen möchte, dessen letztendliches Ziel darin besteht, grundlegende Prinzipien aufzudecken, die die Weiterentwicklung des Wissens auf jedem Gebiet lenken. Diese zweite Variante wissenschaftlicher Bemühungen behagt der ungeduldigen Leidenschaft junger Menschen nicht immer, da sie von einem Ehrgeiz getrieben werden, der unmittelbare Befriedigung verlangt. Ein wenig später im Leben gewährt sie jedoch ein Gefühl der Sicherheit und der Zufriedenheit mit der eigenen Arbeit. Die Freude darüber, nach Jahren der Arbeit eine Synthese heranreifen zu sehen, hilft Forschern, eine großzügigere Haltung gegenüber den Ergebnissen anderer zu bewahren und freimütiger die Namen jener Kollegen zu nennen, deren Forschungsergebnisse zu dem letztendlich erreichten Verständnis beigetragen haben. Die Arbeit wird weniger von Konkurrenz bestimmt und die Atmosphäre in einem Labor freundlicher. Eine solche Haltung ist insbesondere in Forschungseinrichtungen von Wert, in denen sich die Leute durch die Ablieferung von Ergebnissen rechtfertigen müssen und keine Chance haben, sich in die Lehre oder die Verwaltung zu flüchten. Das Langzeit-Programm schützt den einzelnen Forscher und fördert jene Art von Erkenntnis, die Streitigkeiten über geistige Besitzansprüche bedeutungslos werden lässt. Vielen Dank.

Ragnar Granit on the nature of discovery as breaking the canopies of dogma
(00:03:54 - 00:04:36)

 

5) Team up

Many of the Nobel Prizes, from the discovery of RNAi by Craig Mello and Andy Fire to J. Michael Bishop and Harold Varmus’s discoveries related to oncogenes have been true collaborations. Perhaps more than at any time in history, science is not something that is done alone by a lonely scientist locked away in his or her lab, but is rather a true team exercise. A plurality of expertise, backgrounds and points of view is key and interdisciplinarity is now regarded as essential. Several laureates emphasise how important it is to do science in a collegiate atmosphere with flat hierarchies and stress the importance of teaming up with other scientists to tackle challenging scientific problems.

 

Harold Varmus' advice on the pleasures and importance of teaming up with other scientists
(00:26:25 - 00:27:30)

 

 

Ryoji Noyori (2015) - Where am I From? Where Are You Going?

Good morning everybody. I'm very pleased to be back here to Lindau to speak to many world leaders and also respected seniors. My personal perception of scientific research is that it's a never ending journey of knowledge. There is more meaning in experience and various encounters and making a good journey itself than reaching the destination. And excellent research nurtures talented people and also contributes to society. This is my brief. Now I direct your attention to my personal journey which started with miserable days. At the very end of World War II in 1945, just when I was to enter elementary school, the centre of city of my hometown Kobe was reduced to ash by heavy bombing. Even after the World War II ended, my childhood was still very, very difficult because our country lacked food and supplies. Our family of six, my parents, two younger brothers and a sister, lived very frugal. My parents felt strongly that the only thing they could leave to their children was good education. I wanted to become a scientist ever since I was a small child. In 1949, when I was 11 years old, Professor Hideki Yukawa was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics. He was the first Japanese Nobel Laureate, and our great admiration. Shortly after this event in 1951, when I had just entered junior high school, my father took me to a conference of the Toray company on new fibre nylon. The Toray president explained, proudly, that this new fibre could be synthesized from coal, water, and air, and that it was thinner than a spider's thread, yet stronger than a steel wire. I was highly impressed by this description. Here was a new material created by chemistry from almost nothing. Another person I admired in this connection was Professor Ichiro Sakurada, who invented vinylon, the first Japan made synthetic fibre. He was one of the reasons I decided to study chemistry at Kyoto University. Eventually I became an organic chemist, under the excellent guidance of my mentors, and later spent more than three decades at Nagoya University. I have long engaged in research of asymmetric catalysis, a very important subject in chemistry. Many organic compounds have right and left chirality. These are known as enantiomers. The right and left components diverge from each other only very slightly, but we know that this difference can become very large in biological living phenomenon. For example, enantiomers cause things to taste and smell very different. Monosodium glutamate with the left-handed chirality is umami taste enhancer, but that with right-handed combination has a bitter flavour. R-limonene smells like orange, while the S-limonene smells like lemon. Such a structural difference can become even more serious in administration of synthetic drugs. Lipitol is among the most important statin drugs, which efficiently reduce cholesterol levels. It's only right-handed and the left-handed enantiomers is inactive. This phenomenon happens because the receptors in our bodies are proteins, made up of only left-handed amino acids. Therefore, we need a practical method for the synthesis of single-handed molecules called asymmetric catalysis. However, this remained very, very difficult for many years until we came to this field. In 1966, when I was 27 and at the Kyoto University, we discovered the principle of asymmetric catalysis. This was a simple curiosity-driven research and the process was inefficient and practically totally meaningless. Later however, I moved to Nagoya University where we developed a range of asymmetric hydrogenation methods. These processes had universal application and came to be widely used in research and also in industry throughout the world. Our asymmetric catalysts are used for other reactions. Takasago International Corporation very quickly established in 1983 an industrial process for the production of l-menthol. Now then, what is a major impact of our science on society, besides the obvious economic benefits? In 1992, the US FDA set guidelines for racemic switches. At the time, more than 85 percent of synthetic drugs were sold as equally more a mixture of the left-handed and the right-handed compounds. However, this new regulation strongly urged pharmaceutical companies to manufacture and also commercialize pure left- or right-handed compounds. This regulatory addition contributed to a major improvement in medicine. At that time, some 23 years ago, no such large scale asymmetric synthesis existed in the world. I believe that the successful technology developed in Japan was a contributing factor to this important policy change. Well, this is a very small achievement done by us, which clearly indicates the significance of linkage between academia and industry. What are the origins of the competence of this Japanese science? The first is the poverty in our use as described, which nurtured us diligent patient and also hardworking. The second is Japanese culture. The culture permeates every aspect in science and technology. This is particularly important for designing asymmetric catalysts, a kind of molecular craft. We Japanese are blessed with a strong underpinnings of a unique culture and an ancient history since the Asuka and the Nara years spanning the sixth through the eighth century. Every country and region has its own culture which provides a basis for the sensibilities of the individual scientist. I have great respect for Louis Pasteur who once said, "Science has no borders, but scientists have their homelands or fatherlands." I fully agree with those great words. In any case, the contribution of science to society is enormous. Already more than 10 years ago, The US National Academy of Engineering labelled the 20th century as a century of innovation and selected 20 leading technological innovations that have changed or lives decisively during that period, 20th century. Without these innovations, we could not have realized the affluent, civilized society we live in today. I'm very proud of being a chemist because chemistry based materials are everywhere in this great list. However, I believe our chemistry community must reform the system of education, research and technological development toward creating a peaceful pleasant world. Importantly, we have long contributed to the improvement of healthcare, aided by pharmaceutical innovations based on man-made chemical substances. However, chemistry should not remain a mere tool of life science research and bioindustry. Our young generation is required to radically change their mindset by exposure to other scientific disciplines, to explore new scientific or technological possibilities. Industry must be confirmed that they can survive only within the limits of land, non-renewable energy and resources and also water. Therefore, they have to pursue artificial photosynthesis and also the elements strategy to overcome the resource problem. Here again in intensive interdisciplinary collaboration is needed. Furthermore, we must protect environment. As such, green chemistry is becoming extremely important. The essential aspect of use of safe scientific materials, renewable resources, such as biomass, and safe solvents. We must avoid toxic waste and conserve energy in chemical production. Most important organic compounds are synthesized in a step by step fashion. Obviously, each reaction should proceed with high atom economy or atom efficiency, hopefully without hazardous waste. In chemical industry, the E factor, or eco-factor, is significant. To obtain one kilogram of gasoline, by cracking naphtha, only 100 grams of waste is produced. But many important organic compounds are produced from raw materials in a multi-step process that gives rise to accumulated waste and large E factors. Synthesis of structurally more complex pharmaceutical drugs, for instance, forms as much as 100 kilograms of unwanted substances. Green chemistry is a key issue for chemical manufacturer in this century, and it's our responsibility to reduce the amount of undesired waste. This is a typical example already done in our laboratories at Nagoya. Currently, adipic acid, an important component of nylon-6,6 is being manufactured from so-called KA oil (ketone-alcohol oil) and the key oxidation is done by using nitric acid. This is efficient but generates N2O as an unavoidable co-product, not byproduct. In fact, current adipic acid production emits a very large amount of N2O, and we need to recover this N2O because it causes a series of unfavourable environment effects. N2O catalyses the destruction of the ozone layer and it has a very very strong greenhouse effect, and also causes acid rain and smoke. We took note of cyclohexene as a starting material which is produced by a remarkable technology by Asahi Kasei, a company in Japan. We found a very simple green route using aqueous hydrogenperoxide and a small amount of a tungsten catalyst, and this is a perfect reaction in H2O. Water is the sole byproduct. I have spoken my journey of knowledge, and where are you going from now? Currently, research activities in science are diverse and encompass science including chemistry, technology and also innovation. These three activities are strongly linked. However, they are very different from each other. So, scientific discoveries in principle are not something that can be designed. The scientist relies on uncertainty. Technological invention, on the other hand, doesn't happen by chance. Careful planning and determination to see things through are necessary. Individual talent is important, but teamwork is also needed. Innovation is defined as a creation of social and economic value that will change society. It's no simple technical invention. Innovation requires matching of science and technology with social environment and expectation. The value of those in research and society must be re-conspired. Innovation only covers about with timing, location, and teamwork or networking. However, innovation is not easy. Earlier, Goethe warned us. Willing is not enough; we must do.“ There is no reliable equation to realize innovation. We must create an inclusive platform and must act towards innovation. The benefit of modern science-based technology are crystal clear. Here I have listed just a few. Securing adequate food sources. Increases life expectancy. From 45 years to 80 years in just one century. And improving quality of life and also the high-speed communication. Where are science and technology going from now? We are fast-forwarding to a network society, we have never experienced before. Internet and the communication technology, or ICT, is sweeping away the constraint of time and distance, creating a new cyberspace where collective knowledge can be nurtured. The future will probably be a combination of real- and cyber-space, created by ICT technology. We are now able to extract useful information and knowledge from so-called big data. Huge investments are now being made to develop computers in a bit to achieve artificial intelligence. Soon we will have an internet of things, linking people and things as well as science, education, medicine and also industry, for diverse kind of innovation. For example, machine translation and the Google car are very certain to become a reality. Open knowledge will benefit science and technology and society in innumerable ways. A bright light however, also casts a dark shadow. We must share this very important message to engineers of 2020, sent from the US National Academy of Engineering some 10 years ago. For too long, engineering has been controlled by external events, changing only after circumstances dictated it. The pace of change today puts us at risk if we possibly wait for what is to come. Therefore, we need to prepare for the future now so that engineers who graduate in 2020 will not only be capable of implementing the most advanced technology but also be ready to serve as leaders in our society. The year 2020 is soon coming. Looking back the 20th century, there are regrettably a number of events that defied the good name of chemistry, our science. There is no denying that the chemical industry has not always addressed these problems effectively. To cite just a few examples. Acid rain caused by fossil fuel burning, disruption of the biosphere caused by DDT, and the depletion of the ozone layer by the use of halocarbons. Also global warming from excessive greenhouse gas emissions. In many cases, attempts to scientifically verify this kind of negative effect have been hindered by major political and economic pressure, as well as by the internal conflict between public recreation policies and free-market principles. We must learn from lessons of these failures and fulfil our obligation to prevent future disasters. Society demands this of us. In 1999, the world conference on science in Budapest issued a declaration of science and the use of the scientific knowledge, that stressed the scientist's responsibility to society. Over time, the emphasis has changed from mere creating knowledge to science in society, and science for society. In fact, many people worry that contemporary society may be the beginning of the endgame. We live in the 21st century, but we still grapple with the programs of the 20th century. Inherent in our modern society are a series of contradictions. We acknowledge the value of science-based technology. On the other hand, we are compelled to deny it. The negative aspects I referred to include problems related to the population explosion, prevalence of market economy, too rapid advances in industrial technology and major changes in lifestyles. Uncontrolled and excessive human activity is causing grave climate fluctuations, environmental changes and depletion of resources and energy and widening the North-South gap, leading our human society into a crisis situation. These are all programs that we have created, but no one is willing to take responsibility for resolving these problems. The environmental conditions needed for humanity's survival are likely to change in a non-linear and irreversible way. Therefore, before there are catastrophic results, we must pull our knowledge and take measures to guard off this change. We all have obligations to reinforce our shared social assets and reduce our impact on environment. We may already be too late, however. Four months ago, the Global Challenges Foundation and the Future Humanity Institute in the UK drew up a list of twelve risks that threaten human civilization. Many of these problems have already contributed to cause this, and we must have prepared for these possibilities. However still, there is no inclusive approach to address the risks and turn them into opportunities. Science must be for all. Science and technology, I believe, transcend economic activity and are essential for continued human survival, and existence. You all, are world leaders in trying to eradicate these problems by making full use of scientific knowledge and technology of highest standards. I'd like to deliver these words for our younger generations. We cannot walk alone. Our individual knowledge is inextricably bound to the combined knowledge of all humanity. We must connect the best minds to force the development of new and diverse leadership. The 20th century was one of international competition, symbolized by war and economic liberty. In the 21st century, however, we'll have to cooperate globally for the survival of our species within the limit of this planet. Whatever we do, we must do our best. Our German philosopher Martin Heidegger said, "Man is being to death. As soon as man comes to life, he is at once old enough to die. There is nothing as certain as that. All living creatures must die. But humanity must not be so foolish as to destroy itself." Those of a younger generation must work hand-in-hand to carry on. Thank you very much for your listening.

Guten Morgen an Sie alle. Ich freue mich sehr wieder hier in Lindau zu sein, um vor so vielen weltweit führenden und angesehenen Experten zu sprechen. Meine persönliche Wahrnehmung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung ist, dass es einer nie endenden Reise des Wissens gleicht. Es steckt sehr viel Bedeutung in Erfahrung und verschiedenen Begegnungen und es geht eher darum eine gute Reise zu haben, als das Ziel zu erreichen. Exzellente Forschung fördert talentierte Menschen und trägt auch zur Gesellschaft bei. Daran glaube ich. Jetzt möchte ich Ihre Aufmerksamkeit auf meine persönliche Reise lenken, die mit sehr unheilvollen Tagen begann. Zum Ende des 2. Weltkrieges, 1945, gerade als ich eingeschult werden sollte, wurde das Stadtzentrum meiner Heimatstadt Kobe durch schwere Bombardierung in Schutt und Asche gelegt. Sogar nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkrieges war meine Kindheit noch sehr, sehr schwierig, weil unserem Land Lebensmittel und Vorräte fehlten. Unsere sechsköpfige Familie, meine Eltern, zwei jüngere Brüder und eine Schwester, lebte von sehr wenig. Meine Eltern waren überzeugt, dass das einzige, was sie ihren Kindern mitgeben konnten, eine gute Ausbildung war. Ich wollte schon immer ein Wissenschaftler werden. Er war der erste japanische Nobelpreisträger und wir bewunderten ihn sehr. Kurz nach diesem Ereignis 1951, als ich in die weiterführende Schule überging, nahm mich mein Vater zu einer Konferenz der Firma Toray über neue Nylon-Fasern mit. Der Toray-Präsident erklärte stolz, dass diese neue Faser aus Kohle, Wasser und Luft synthetisiert werden konnte, und dass sie dünner als ein Faden einer Spinne, aber stärker als ein Stahldraht ist. Ich war von dieser Beschreibung sehr beeindruckt. Hier wurde ein neues Material durch die Chemie aus nichts hergestellt. Eine andere Person, die ich in diesem Zusammenhang bewunderte, war Professor Ichiro Sakurada, der Vinalon erfand, die erste in Japan hergestellte Kunstfaser. Er gehörte zu einem der Gründe, warum ich beschloss, Chemie an der Universität Kyoto zu studieren. Ich wurde schließlich ein Chemiker, unter der hervorragenden Leitung meiner Mentoren, und später verbrachte ich mehr als drei Jahrzehnte an der Nagoya-Universität. Ich war sehr lange an der Forschung der asymmetrischen Katalyse beteiligt, einem sehr wichtigen Thema in der Chemie. Viele organische Verbindungen haben rechts- und linkshändige Chiralität. Diese werden als Enantiomere bezeichnet. Die rechten und linken Komponenten weichen nur sehr geringfügig voneinander ab, aber wir wissen, dass dieser Unterschied sehr große Wirkung in Lebewesen hat. Beispielsweise sorgen Enantiomere dafür, dass Dinge sehr unterschiedlich schmecken und riechen. Mononatriumglutamat mit der linkshändigen Chiralität wirkt als ein Umami-Geschmacksverstärker, aber kombiniert mit der rechtshändigen Seite, hat es einen bitteren Geschmack. R-Limonen riechen nach Orange, während die S-Limonen nach Zitrone riechen. Solche strukturellen Unterschiede können sogar noch stärker in der Gabe von synthetischen Medikamenten gezeigt werden. Lipitol gehört zu den wichtigsten Statin-Arzneistoffen, welche den Cholesterinspiegel effizient reduzieren. Es ist nur rechtshändig und die linkshändigen Enantiomere sind inaktiv. Dieses Phänomen erscheint, weil die Rezeptoren in unserem Körper Proteine sind, die aus nur linkshändigen Aminosäuren zusammengesetzt sind. Daher brauchen wir eine praktikable Methode zur Synthese von einhändigen Molekülen namens asymmetrische Katalyse. Dies blieb für viele Jahre jedoch sehr, sehr schwierig, bis wir in diesen Bereich kamen. Hierbei handelte es sich um eine durch Neugier getriebene Forschung und der Prozess war ineffizient und praktisch völlig bedeutungslos. Später jedoch wechselte ich zur Nagoya Universität, wo wir eine asymmetrische Hydrierungsmethode entwickelten. Diese Prozesse fanden universelle Anwendung und wurden in der Forschung häufig verwendet und auch in der Industrie auf der ganzen Welt. Unsere asymmetrischen Katalysatoren werden für andere Reaktionen verwendet. Takasago International Corporation schaffte sehr schnell 1983 einen industriellen Prozess zur Herstellung von l-Menthol. Was ist nun eine spürbare Auswirkung unserer Wissenschaft auf die Gesellschaft, neben den offensichtlichen wirtschaftlichen Vorteilen? Damals wurden mehr als 85 Prozent der synthetischen Medikamente mit einer Mischung aus gleichermaßen linkshändigen und rechtshändigen Verbindungen verkauft. Diese Neuregelung drängte Pharma-Unternehmen jedoch stark zur Herstellung und Kommerzialisierung von rein links- oder rechtshändigen Verbindungen. Dieser regulatorische Zusatz trug zu einer Verbesserung in der Medizin bei. Zu dieser Zeit, vor etwa 23 Jahren, existierte eine solch groß angelegte asymmetrische Synthese nicht in der Welt. Ich glaube, dass die erfolgreiche Technologie, die in Japan entwickelt wurde, ein entscheidender Faktor für diese wichtige Änderung bei der FDA war. Nun, hier haben wir eine sehr kleine Leistung erbracht, und doch wird dadurch die Bedeutung der Verbindung zwischen Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft deutlich. Wo liegen die Ursprünge der Kompetenz dieser japanischen Wissenschaft? Zunächst einmal ist da die Armut in unserer Jugend, die ich zu Beginn erwähnte, die uns zu fleißigen und geduldigen Menschen machte. Die zweite Ursache liegt in der japanischen Kultur. Die Kultur durchdringt alle Aspekte in Wissenschaft und Technologie. Dies ist besonders wichtig für die Gestaltung der asymmetrischen Katalysatoren, eine Art molekulares Handwerk. Wir Japaner sind mit einem starken Fundament einer einzigartigen Kultur und einer alten Geschichte gesegnet seit der Asuka- und der Nara-Zeit zwischen dem sechsten und achten Jahrhundert. Jedes Land und jede Region hat seine eigene Kultur, die eine Grundlage für die Gedanken des einzelnen Wissenschaftlers bildet. Ich habe großen Respekt für Louis Pasteur, der einmal sagte, "Wissenschaft hat keine Grenzen, aber Wissenschaftler haben ihre Heimatländer oder Vaterländer". Ich stimme diesen großen Worten voll zu. Der Beitrag der Wissenschaft für die Gesellschaft ist enorm. Bereits vor über 10 Jahren, ernannte die US National Academy of Engineering das 20. Jahrhundert zum Jahrhundert der Innovation und wählte 20 führende technologische Innovationen aus, die unsere Leben entscheidend während dieses Zeitraums, des 20. Jahrhunderts, geändert haben. Ohne diese Innovationen hätten wir nicht diese wohlhabende, zivilisierte Gesellschaft, in der wir heute leben, schaffen können. Ich bin stolz, ein Chemiker zu sein, weil auf Chemie basierende Stoffe sich oft in dieser großen Liste wiederfinden. Ich glaube jedoch, dass die Chemiker-Community das Bildungssystem, die Forschung und technologische Entwicklung reformieren muss – nämlich ausgerichtet auf eine friedliche und lebenswerte Welt. Wichtig ist, dass wir lange zur Verbesserung der Gesundheitsversorgung beigetragen haben, was durch pharmazeutische Innovationen auf der Grundlage von künstlich hergestellten chemischen Stoffen basierte. Jedoch sollte die Chemie kein bloßes Werkzeug der Life-Science-Forschung und Bioindustrie bleiben. Unsere junge Generation muss ihre Denkweise ändern und sich anderen wissenschaftlichen Disziplinen öffnen, um so neue wissenschaftliche oder technologische Möglichkeiten zu erfassen. Die Industrie muss wissen, dass sie nur innerhalb der Grenzen von Landverfügbarkeit, mit erneuerbaren Energien sowie der gegebenen Knappheit von Ressourcen und Wasser arbeiten kann. Daher müssen sie künstliche Photosynthese und auch die Elementen-Strategie zur Überwindung des Ressourcenproblems verfolgen. Hier ist wieder eine intensive interdisziplinäre Zusammenarbeit erforderlich. Darüber hinaus müssen wir die Umwelt schützen. Daher ist die umweltschonende Chemie äußerst wichtig. Der wesentliche Aspekt ist die Nutzung sicherer wissenschaftlicher Werkstoffe, nachwachsender Rohstoffe (wie Biomasse) und sicherer Lösungsmittel. Wir müssen vermeiden, Giftmüll zu produzieren und Energieeinsparung in der chemischen Produktion erzielen. Die wichtigsten organischen Verbindungen werden Schritt für Schritt synthetisiert. Natürlich sollte jede Reaktion mit einer Atomökonomie oder Atom-Effizienz, hoffentlich ohne Sondermüll fortgesetzt werden. In der chemischen Industrie, ist der E-Faktor oder Öko-Faktor von Bedeutung. Um ein Kilogramm Benzin durch die Verwendung von Naphtha zu erhalten, werden nur 100 Gramm Abfälle produziert. Aber viele wichtige organische Verbindungen entstehen aus Rohstoffen in mehreren Schritten, was zu Abfall und schweren Umweltauswirkungen führt. Die Synthese struktureller, komplexerer pharmazeutischer Medikamente, zum Beispiel, bildet mehr als 100 Kilogramm unerwünschte Stoffe. Die grüne Chemie ist ein Schlüsselthema für die Chemieunternehmen in diesem Jahrhundert, und es ist unsere Verantwortung, unerwünschte Abfälle zu reduzieren. Dies ist ein typisches Beispiel, was schon in unseren Labors in Nagoya umgesetzt wurde. Aktuell, wird Adipinsäure, ein wichtiger Bestandteil des Nylon-6,6 aus sogenanntem KA Öl (Keton-Alkohol Öl)hergestellt und die wichtigste Oxidation erfolgt mithilfe von Salpetersäure. Dies ist effizient, aber erzeugt N2O als unvermeidbares Co-Produkt, nicht als Nebenprodukt. In der Tat verursacht die momentane Adipinsäureproduktion einen sehr großen N2O-Ausstoß, und wir müssen dieses N2O rückgewinnen, da es eine Reihe von negativen Umweltauswirkungen hat. N2O wirkt als Katalysator bei der Zerstörung der Ozonschicht und hat einen sehr starken Treibhauseffekt und verursacht auch sauren Regen und Rauch. Wir nahmen Cyclohexen, ein Ausgangsstoff der durch eine bemerkenswerte Technologie von Asahi Kasei produziert wir, einem Unternehmen aus Japan. Wir fanden eine sehr einfachen "grünen" Weg mit wässrigem Wasserstoffperoxid und einer geringen Menge eines Wolframkatalysators, und dies ergibt eine perfekte Reaktion in H2O. Wasser ist das einzige Nebenprodukt. Ich habe über meine Reise des Wissens gesprochen, und wohin gehen Sie jetzt? Derzeit sind die Forschungstätigkeiten in der Wissenschaft sehr vielfältig und umfassen die Wissenschaft, wie Chemie, Technologie und auch Innovation. Diese drei Aktivitäten sind stark miteinander verbunden. Allerdings sind sie unterschiedlich. Wissenschaftliche Entdeckungen sind im Prinzip nichts, was gestaltet werden kann. Die Wissenschaftler stützten sich auf Unsicherheiten. Technologische Erfindungen, auf der anderen Seite geschehen nicht durch Zufall. Sorgfältige Planung und Entschlossenheit, die Dinge zu durchschauen, sind notwendig. Individuelles Talent ist wichtig, aber Teamarbeit wird auch benötigt. Innovation wird als eine Schöpfung des sozialen und wirtschaftlichen Werts definiert, die die Gesellschaft verändern wird. Es ist nicht nur eine bloße technische Erfindung. Innovation erfordert Übereinstimmung von Wissenschaft und Technik mit dem sozialen Umfeld und den gesellschaftlichen Erwartungen. Der Wert dieser in Forschung und Gesellschaft muss wieder hervorgehoben werden. Innovation funktioniert nur in Übereinstimmung des Zeitpunkts, Orts, und der Teamarbeit oder Vernetzung. Innovation ist jedoch nicht leicht. Schon Goethe warnte uns. Der Wille ist nicht genug; Wir müssen es tun." Es gibt keine zuverlässige Gleichung, Innovationen zu realisieren. Wir müssen eine integrative Plattform erstellen und auf Innovation hin arbeiten. Der Vorteil der modernen Wissenschaft basierend auf Technologie ist glasklar. Hier habe ich nur ein paar aufgeführt. Das Sichern von ausreichenden Nahrungsquellen. Es erhöht die Lebenserwartung. Von 45 auf 80 Jahre in nur einem Jahrhundert. Und die Verbesserung der Lebensqualität und auch die Hochgeschwindigkeitskommunikation. In welche Richtung bewegen sich Wissenschaft und Technik von jetzt an? Wir verändern uns schnell zu einer Netzwerkgesellschaft, wie wir sie zuvor noch nie erlebt haben. Internet und Kommunikationstechnologie oder IKT, eliminiert Einschränkungen durch Zeit und Distanz, und erstellt einen neuen Cyberspace, wo kollektives Wissen gesammelt werden kann. Die Zukunft wird wahrscheinlich aus einer Kombination von Real - und Cyber-Space bestehen, die durch IKT-Technologie geschaffen wurde. Wir sind jetzt in der Lage, nützliche Informationen und Wissen aus den so genannten Big Data zu extrahieren. Enorme Investitionen werden nun unternommen, um Computer zu entwickeln, um künstliche Intelligenz zu schaffen. Bald haben wir ein Internet der Dinge, das Menschen und Dinge sowie Wissenschaft, Bildung, Medizin und auch Industrie, für diverse Arten der Innovation miteinander verbindet. Beispielsweise werden maschinelle Übersetzungen und das Google-Auto sehr sicher Wirklichkeit werden. Wissenschaft und Technologie und Gesellschaft werden vom offenen Wissen auf unzählige Arten profitieren. Ein helles Licht wirft jedoch auch einen dunklen Schatten. Wir müssen diese sehr wichtige Botschaft mit den Ingenieuren von 2020 teilen, die vor etwa 10 Jahren von der US National Academy of Engineering veröffentlicht wurde. Zu lange wurde das Ingenieurswesen durch externe Ereignisse kontrolliert, und es änderte sich nur etwas, als die Umstände danach verlangten. Das Tempo des Wandels versetzt uns heute in Gefahr, wenn wir eventuell auf das warten wollen, was vor uns steht. Daher müssen wir uns jetzt für die Zukunft vorbereiten so dass im Jahr 2020 Ingenieure nicht nur die fortschrittlichste Technologie umsetzen können, sondern auch als Vorbilder in unserer Gesellschaft dienen können. Das Jahr 2020 wird bald kommen. Wenn wir auf das 20. Jahrhundert zurückblicken, gibt es leider eine Reihe von Ereignissen, die den guten Ruf von Chemie, unserer Wissenschaft, verletzen. Es ist nicht zu leugnen, dass die Chemische Industrie diese Probleme nicht immer wirksam angegangen ist. Um nur ein paar Beispiele zu nennen. Saurer Regen verursacht durch die Verbrennung von fossilen Brennstoffen, Störung der Biosphäre verursacht durch DDT und der Abbau der Ozonschicht durch den Einsatz von Halogenkohlenwasserstoffen. Auch die globale Erwärmung durch die übermäßigen Treibhausgas-Emissionen. In vielen Fällen wurden Versuche, diese Art von negativen Auswirkungen wissenschaftlich zu überprüfen, durch großen politischen und wirtschaftlichen Druck, sowie durch interne Konflikte zwischen dem öffentlichem Interesse und den Prinzipien des freien Marktes verhindert. Wir müssen aus diesen Fehlern lernen und unsere Verpflichtung, künftige Katastrophen zu verhindern, erfüllen. Die Gesellschaft fordert dies von uns. in der die Verwendung wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse, sowie die gesellschaftliche Verantwortung der Wissenschaftler betont wurde. Im Laufe der Zeit änderte sich der Schwerpunkt vom reinen Schaffen von Wissen zu Wissenschaft in der Gesellschaft und Wissenschaft für die Gesellschaft. In der Tat fürchten viele Menschen, dass die Gegenwartsgesellschaft am Anfang des Endes steht. Wir leben im 21. Jahrhundert, aber wir kämpfen immer noch gegen die Strategien des 20. Jahrhunderts. Unsere moderne Gesellschaft ist von einer Reihe von Widersprüchen geprägt. Wir erkennen den Wert von auf Wissenschaft basierter Technologie an. Auf der anderen Seite sind wir gezwungen, sie zu leugnen. Die negativen Aspekte, auf die ich mich bezog, umfassen die Probleme der Bevölkerungsexplosion, der Marktwirtschaft; die zu raschen Fortschritten in der Industrietechnik und die großen Veränderungen im Lebensstil. Unkontrollierte und übermäßige menschliche Aktivität verursachen massive Klimaschwankungen, Umweltveränderungen und die Erschöpfung der Ressourcen und von Energie, sowie eine Verstärkung des Nord-Süd-Gefälles, was unsere Gesellschaft auf eine Krise zusteuert. Das sind alles Probleme, die wir selbst geschaffen haben, aber niemand ist bereit, Verantwortung für die Lösung dieser Probleme zu übernehmen. Die Umweltbedingungen werden sich voraussichtlich nichtlinear und irreversibel ändern, obwohl sie für das Überleben der Menschen essentiell sind. Daher, bevor es zur Katastrophe kommt, müssen wir unser Wissen anwenden und Maßnahmen ergreifen, um diese Veränderungen zu verhindern. Wir alle sind verpflichtet, uns zu verbünden und unsere Auswirkungen auf die Umwelt zu verringern. Möglicherweise ist es jedoch bereits zu spät. Vor vier Monaten hat die Global Challenges Foundation und das Future Humanity Institute in Großbritannien eine Liste der zwölf Risiken erstellt, die die Zivilisation bedrohen. Viele dieser Probleme sind bereits vorhanden und wir müssen uns auf sie einstellen. Aber dennoch gibt es keinen integrativen Ansatz zur Bewältigung der Risiken und um sie in Chancen umzuwandeln. Wissenschaft muss für alle zugänglich sein. Wissenschaft und Technologie, so glaube ich, sind stärker als reine Wirtschaft und sind von wesentlicher Bedeutung für die Zukunft der Menschheit. Ihnen allen kommt eine führende Rolle zu, diese Probleme zu lösen, indem sie Wissenschaft und Technologie der höchsten Standards nutzen. Ich möchte diese Worte an unsere jüngeren Generationen richten. Wir können diesen Weg nicht alleine gehen. Unser individuelles Wissen ist untrennbar mit dem gesamtheitlichen Wissen der Menschheit verbunden. Wir müssen die besten Köpfe zusammenbringen, um die Entwicklung von neuen und diversifizierten Führungsmethoden zu fördern. Das 20. Jahrhundert war ein Jahrhundert des internationalen Wettbewerbs; es war durch Krieg und wirtschaftliche Freizügigkeit definiert. Im 21. Jahrhundert allerdings müssen wir weltweit für das Überleben unserer Spezies arbeiten, wobei wir die gegebenen Grenzen unseres Planeten respektieren. Was immer wir tun, wir müssen unser Bestes geben. Der deutsche Philosophen Martin Heidegger sagte: "Der Mensch ist zum Tode verurteilt. Sobald er zum Leben erwacht, ist er auf einmal alt genug, um zu sterben. Es gibt nichts so sicher wie das. Alle Lebewesen müssen sterben. Aber die Menschheit darf nicht so dumm sein, sich selbst zu zerstören." Die jüngere Generation muss Hand in Hand arbeiten, um zu leben. Vielen Dank.

Ryoji Noyori highlights the interconnectedness of science
(00:29:25 - 00:30:57)

 

 

6) Try and stay on the bench

As a scientist moves through his or her career from PhD student to professor, they almost move further and further away from the experiments themselves. Indeed, most career scientists find that more and more of their time is eaten up by bureaucratic form-filling and with less and less time left for the actual science itself. This doesn’t have to be the case according to many Nobel Laureates. In fact, two laureates well over 70 years of age – Oliver Smithies and Avram Hershko – particularly emphasise this point. Amazingly, Smithies was first author of a research paper (performing most of the experiments himself) at the ripe old age of 89!

 

Avram Hershko emphasising science as a curiosity-driven adventure
(00:30:07 - 00:30:45)

 

 

Oliver Smithies (2015) - Ideas Come from Many Places

Well, where to begin? I'm not going to tell you what this slide is about. You'd have to come this afternoon, and we can talk about it. But "Where Do Ideas Come From" is the title of my talk, and it's always a question of where to begin. And I think this is a good place to begin because this is one of the joyful times that happens to a Nobel Laureate that somebody decides they would like to remember where you were at school, and I was at school here from age 5 to 11. And they unveiled a plaque here, and some of the kids are there celebrating with me. It's interesting to me because I already knew by the time I left this school at that age that I wanted to be a scientist, but I didn't know the word. The best I could come up with was I wanted to be an inventor, as a result of reading comic strips about inventors. And then I'd like you to see where it was that I lived. I lived in a little village called Copley with a population of only 1,500, and I'm curious, how many of you guys come from a village as small as that? Not very many. But it was a good place to live. The school was about over here, and my home was up here, and there was a rather lovely river there, the River Calder, except for the fact that when I was a kid it was badly polluted, though it no longer is I'm happy to say. If you go down this River Calder, you come to, there's Copley, and here is the River Calder... You come to another town, Elland, and Elland has a population of 15,000, so it's a rather bigger town. And it produced a Nobel Laureate in 1997 in chemistry. If you go upstream from Copley, you come to another town, Todmorden, that also has a population of about 15,000. It produced two Nobel Laureates. So the water? Obviously not. (laughs) The teachers is the answer. The teachers inspire you and give you all sorts of thoughts. And in fact, we can look at the teachers that were involved in all of these persons. And Smithies had a good teacher in elementary school and two teachers in high school. And Walker had a good science teacher. And Cockcroft and Wilkinson both had the same science teacher, so that science teacher was teaching for more than 20 years and produced, as it were, two Nobel Laureates. So if you're a teacher, think how much influence you can have in the future. Maybe you will have the enjoyment of being a teacher and being remembered. Maybe you'll produce a Nobel Laureate, who knows? So be a careful teacher when you're a teacher. I had a grand teacher when I went to college. I went to college in Oxford University, Balliol College. And this is my teacher, "Sandy" Ogston. He was trained in chemistry and then took a second degree in physiology and began to teach students, in the medical curriculum, and I had won my scholarship to the college with physics, but I for some reason that escapes me now, I decided to do medicine. Anyway, "Sandy" Ogston was my teacher. And he produced a Nobel Laureate in 1976 and another one in 2007, so some teachers can really inspire you. The way of teaching at that time in Oxford, and it still is the primary way, is a marvellous way, and I wish we could do it more easily all over the world. But it's an expensive way of teaching. And that is that once a week, you would meet with your teacher, in this case "Sandy" Ogston and present to him or her an essay that you had written over the preceding week on a topic that had been assigned to you. And you were expected to produce something that went back to the original literature. You couldn't work with a textbook, or you might read a textbook, you might read a review, but you were expected to write something original. Might get a topic, "Oh, write me an essay on pain." And that's all you'll be told, and you were expected to produce a learned article in a week. (laughs) Well Sandy set me the topic, "Write me an essay, Oliver, on energy metabolism." Now this was before the tricarboxylic acid cycle had been published, before Krebs' cycle. And I set about this task. And then I came across this. And why would I show you a book? I show you this book because what's in this book was so exciting that I remember where I was when I read it. I remember what the book looked like. I remember what the paper looked like. It was so inspiring to read something that made sense out of what appeared to be nonsense. And the nonsense was: Why doesn't the body just burn glucose and make carbon dioxide? It goes through all these complicated things of adding phosphate and doing this and that and the other. And why does it do it? And this book contains the answer. The answer is this little squiggle here, squiggle P, which means energy-rich phosphate, an energy-rich phosphate bond. And for the chemists, it's interesting that the energy-rich ones are all acid anhydrides, and acid anhydrides are very powerful organic compounds, have much more energy in them, for example, than a phosphate ester would have. And anyway, true to form, I came back with an essay the following week. And in it, I had Smithies' cycle. And it was rather a neat cycle because you could start with an inorganic phosphate and make a phosphate ester, and that's relatively low energy and take away a couple of hydrogens. And you can convert the phosphate ester into an acid anhydride here, and that's energy rich, from which you could make ATP. And then go around here and add the hydrogen back, and you could start over again, and you could produce energy for nothing. Well, I wasn't completely stupid. I did know it was wrong, but I didn't know why it was wrong. And that was an interesting problem. And "Sandy" Ogston proceeded to write an article on it eventually because it turned out that people had forgotten in making the calculations that you had to think about the concentration of things, not just about what was called standard free energies in those days, where every reaction component was at one molar concentration. And he worked out that there had to be a system that produced energy in moving electrons up the electromotive scale, you might say, in the cell. So he foresaw the importance of energy by concentration, and he also realised that the system wouldn't work if the substrates dissociated from their enzymes. They had to be handed over as it were without dissociating into free substrate. Otherwise, the kinetics would be wrong, so it was a good article. And he published it, and he was kind enough to add my name as a scholar of Balliol College, and I felt pretty good about this. And then this was 1948, so it's quite a long time ago. But then somewhere around about, oh let's say, I don't know the exact date, but say 1990 or thereabout somebody came up to me and said, you see 1990 would be And I rather modestly said, "Well as a matter of fact, I am." And he said, "Oh I thought you were dead." (laughs) So anyway, on with the game, and here's my PhD thesis, and you can see a lot of significant figures here. And in fact those are real significant figures. They're not due to not rounding off in a computer, which is the common method of getting many significant figures. But you can see that my experimental points are really rather closely together, and I was measuring osmotic pressure. It's not very important to know what that is, but the points were so close that I had to interrupt the line to put the theoretical line on, so I was very proud of this super precision method. And I published it, "A Dynamic Osmometer for Accurate Measurements," a neat paper. It has a record. Nobody ever quoted it. Nobody ever used the method again, and I never used the method again. So you have to ask yourself, "Well what was the point of it?" And I want you to think a moment. Well the point of it was that I learned to do good science, and I enjoyed it. And those are the critical things in the early stages of your career that you learn to do good work and to enjoy it. It does not matter what you do. It's absolutely unimportant. You do not want to be a clone of your advisor. You do not want to be a clone of your post-doctoral advisor. You want to be yourself, but you can learn from these people how to do good science, but you must be enjoying it. Otherwise, you won't have that fire that's needed. So I urge you, if you aren't doing what you like, go to your advisor and say, "I need another problem. I'm not enjoying it." If your advisor can't do that, change your advisor. I'm serious. It's so important because it's very unlikely, and I hope it is true that you will do work of the same type that you did when you were a graduate student or when you were a postdoc. You may use the skill, but you hope to do something different. And I didn't achieve that in my graduate work or in my postdoc. My postdoc was equally undistinguished, but I went to Toronto to get a job. And there I was given a job by David Scott, and he was an early worker in the field of insulin work because insulin was discovered in Toronto, and he was the first person to crystalize it and make a long-lasting insulin. And he said, "You can work on anything you like as long as it has something to do with insulin." And I thought, There might be a precursor." Well, we now know there is a precursor. But in case you're waiting, I did not discover it, but I tried. And on the way, I had to find a way of looking at insulin, thinking I would find something slightly different in electrophoresis. And in those days, much electrophoresis was done on filter paper, where you would soak a filter paper with buffer, apply the protein, and allow it to migrate, and you can it just unrolled like a smear and really was very poor, and I was rather frustrated. And then I heard of the work of these two gentlemen: Kunkel and Slater, and they'd use a box, a box about this big, this big and so on. And they filled it full of starch grains, rather like a sandbox, except there were grains of starch, and they had buffer around it, and they applied the sample in the starch. And the advantage was that unlike the filter paper... This is from their paper... Here's a protein applied on filter paper, and it smeared, just as my insulin smeared. But when they put it on the starch grain, it came out as a nice peak. But in order to find the protein, you had to cut it up into 40 slices and do a protein determination on every slice, so you had to do 40 protein determinations for one electrophoresis run. I didn't even have a dishwasher in my lab, didn't have a technician. I couldn't do that. But I remembered helping my mother do the laundry, well I was there anyway. She took starch powder and cooked it up with hot water and made a slimy mix, which was used to apply to collars of my father's shirts, which needed to be stiff, and so it was ironed. And when you tied it up at the end of the day, the starch, it set into a jelly. And I thought, "Well my gosh, if I go back and make a starch gel out of the starch, cook it up, and then I can stain it, and I will get rid of all of that problem of 40 slices." Saturday morning was when I had that. And by the afternoon, I'd started my first experiment with it. There is a slot, and there is the insulin as a nice band and made the remark, And that was the beginning of gel electrophoresis. It went on because some time later just for a rough test, I put plasma or serum onto it, and I could see the bands that were known of the proteins that were known to be present in blood at that time. People thought there were five proteins: albumin, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, and gamma globulin. We now know there are about 700 or something like that. But anyway at that time, people thought five, and I got these bands and set it up again, oh 12 midnight. And I could work at any time. And excuse me, and then a little bit later, I managed to see this sort of a pattern with many bands, and I had too many bands to label. In fact, I could find 11 all together, and here's when if you have a good boss, you can really make a step forward because I went to Scottie, as by then he and I called each other Scottie and Oliver. I went to Scottie and said, "Scottie, I've really found something very interesting. I'd like to stop working on insulin and work on this problem." And he said, he was a good scientist, "By all means, change", and that I hope you have that experience. You see I was long past my postdoc when it happened to me... That you get a time when you see you found something that you ought to do that's different from what has happened in the past. And I was ready to publish my work, and these are two of my friends. I got tired of bleeding myself and so I got blood from my friends. And I mean that's what they're for, isn't it? And that's George Connell and Gordon Dixon, and why aren't there photographs? My lab didn't own a camera. It was such a poor lab at that time. But I was about ready to get ready to publish and getting photographs made. And then just by chance, I ran another sample from BW, and it was very strange, many extra bands. And so what was funny about BW? It was a woman. This is the first time that I'd run a sample from a woman. I thought I found a new method of telling men from women. And I called one pattern the M pattern and the other pattern the F pattern: M for male, F for female. And I could do two samples in a day for about a week or so, male and female always fit right. And then the sixth time, they were changed. And the man had changed into a woman. We gave him a real hard time. Come on Casey. Let's have look. But anyway, such is youth you might say. But here is my data file. Just remarkable, but it turned out the difference between the types had nothing to do with gender. It had nothing to do with the existing blood groups, and it was obviously something new. And I show this for another reason. It's a data file that's now, well what, almost 60 years old. You won't be able to produce your data file 60 years from now if you don't make a hard copy. You got to make hard copies of the important data that you have. Don't rely on your computer because you can't read a floppy disc now, and there was a time when that was what we had. You won't be able to read a CD in 10 years from now, for sure. Make some hard copies and keep good hard copies. Well those differences that were here turned out to be genetic. And just to close this story, it was a rather complicated genetic difference, and we worked it out with the help of Norma Ford-Walker, who was a marvellous geneticist and taught me genetics. And then as things moved on, we changed from not being able to do protein sequencing to be able to protein sequence, isolating genes, sequencing gene, and it began to become clear that there was something that one might do about this. For example, Linus Pauling and Harvey Itano and Vernon Ingram showed that the sickle cell mutation was just due to a change of glutamic acid to a valine in the globin molecule. And I began to think it ought to be possible to correct the gene by gene targeting. We now are at a stage where we had cloned DNA, a normal DNA. And I thought if I introduce a piece of normal DNA, I might be able to get some crossing over, so SA lining up with SA and GE and change the bad gene into the good gene by crossing over. I knew it was possible in yeast, and Jack is here today... I don't know whether he's here in the audience now, but Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver had shown that in yeast you could target a gene, and I was teaching, so I had taught this. But the yeast genome is about, well what, two orders of magnitude smaller than the human genome. And so whether it could be done in a human was not at all clear. And then again in teaching "Where do ideas come from?" When you teach, you have to understand. And in order to understand, you sometimes have to spend a long time reading a paper before you can understand it well enough to teach it. And this was a paper that came out April 1st in 1982, and they talked about a method of rescuing a gene, and I can't go into the details, except to say, because of time, that it involved finding a piece of blue DNA, you might say, next to red DNA. The red DNA was what they wanted to isolate, and the blue DNA was what they used to find it. And I thought that I could use this method for gene targeting tests. So here's, only three weeks after that paper came out, an assay for gene placement. And my idea was to use their blue DNA, which you could score in bacteria and try to target the beta globin gene and look for this fragment. I should say: this is incoming DNA, this is the target. If I could find a piece of DNA where these two were together, I would've proved that targeting had occurred because this was not on the incoming DNA, and this was not on the target. And with quite a lot of work, we got further down and got to the stage of simplifying it and used a rather simpler plasmid, which looks very like the one that Terry Orr-Weaver had used, and you could see that if you hit the gene, this is a restriction enzyme map that in the right way, you could isolate a fragment of DNA that would be 11 kilobases if you didn't hit the gene. If you hit the gene, then the size would be eight kilobases. And a long set of experiments led to the final day, when on a Saturday when I developed a film of testing different colonies, and there is the one where the fragment is now a seven, eight kilobases long instead of larger, so this proved that gene targeting was possible. And once you've proved something is possible, then you can go and use it, and other people will start to do it. But the frequency was hopelessly low and not practical for the original purpose, which was to try to help a person with sickle cell anaemia. So what to do? Talk to somebody else, and I went and read about Martin Evans' work, which was using an embryonic stem cell. Here is a blastocyst. That's the part of the blastocyst that will give rise to the embryo. And what Martin Evans and his students learned how to culture those in culture, so that he had these cells growing in culture from a cream-coloured mouse. And if you put these cream-coloured stem cells back into a blastocyst, they would remember where they came from, and you could generate a mouse from this blastocyst by putting it back into a pseudopregnant female, and you would get chimeric mice, mixtures. And from them, you could breed out the gene that you were interested in. So that was an obvious thing. Let's use this method to alter gene. But the assay was terrible. And so we had to have help from a chemist, and we got help from Kary Mullis, who got the Nobel Prize for inventing polymerase chain reaction. And here is a little place in one of my notebooks, saying that we could use this method to detect the recombinant. And I made an apparatus to do it. This is my apparatus. Why would you make an apparatus? Well the reason was there wasn't one available. You could not get an apparatus for doing PCR. But I think this ought to have this label on it because that's what my graduate student friends used to put on an apparatus that was lying somewhere on the floor. And it stands for NBGBOKFO, no bloody good, but okay for Oliver because I would always make stuff out of junk, you see, and so these are all junk things. None of them were new, and yet that's the apparatus which we used and helped me towards the Nobel Prize. The method was good, and here's a super article about it, and you notice I'm not an author. I'm happy to say the author is down there. She's my wife, and she went and made a marvellous animal that could get atherosclerosis. Well, so where to? Well, I'm showing you this one more thing because I have one little more topic to talk about. Here's "Sandy" Ogston again, but there's a little difference now because I've got the date of his death. Because he asked, "When I die, Oliver, I'd like you to write my scientific memoirs." That was something that the Royal Society liked to have. And then you have to read all of his papers. And I read all his of his papers. And then he had this beautiful, little formula here, talking about the available space in a gel to molecules of radius big R when the gel is composed of fibres of radius little r, and there are n fibres per square centimetre. He was talking about a cross section of the gel. And this equation is beautifully precise. It worked in every gel you ever heard of and has been tested inordinately. These two guys in my lab, and they made this diagram to illustrate it, and I like it. If you have a small solute, it can find lots of space in a gel. But if you have a large solute, it can only find a limited space. And so I thought this might apply to the kidney, and I wrote a paper on this that the idea being that here the small molecules would come through the kidney easily. And big molecules, if they had to pass through a gel, would come rather low concentration, and I published a diagram illustrating the principle. This is a cross section of a kidney at electron microscope dimension. And these are the sizes of albumin molecules drawn to scale, and this is the gel in the kidney through which I thought the thing might happen. And so I went to our local person who was an expert in making a gold nanoparticle, which I wanted to use, to see in the electron microscope. And he said, I'm not going to make them for you, Oliver. You make your own. He said, "You'll learn more if you make them." I got hooked. They're marvellous, interesting things, and I spent a large amount of my personal time on them. I'll just show you one example here. That's what, four years ago. And this was the time when I first learned... Was still working at the weekend. This is the time when I found out that I could control the size of the molecule by varying the time of a reaction step in the procedure. I got a paper out of it in Langmuir, and I'm the first author. And I'm the first author because I did the work, not because I wrote the paper, though I did, but because the experiments were mine, most of them. And so, think about it. It's really rather neat to have a first author paper when you're 89 and especially if this is the first paper I ever published in a chemistry journal. But I have one more... Oh there's an example of working of it. Here is plasma with the large molecules in clusters, and they can't get into the basement membrane. It's more complicated than that, but that's an example. I've one last, a little thing to show you, and that's this. And what am I showing an aeroplane for? Wel,l partly because that's been a part of my life, but this is my instructor, Field Morey. And he taught me to fly, and I was a nervous flyer. And when I learned to fly with him, instructor sits here, and the pupil sit in the left seat. And sweat used to pour off me, I mean literally. And so one day I turned to him and said, "That was a good day for you. Only one drop dripped." That gives you some idea. Well, I later on learned to be an instructor, and I had a pupil, Jeff Bloch. And when we went flying together, I was teaching him to glide, he would come back absolutely sodden. His back would be completely sticking to himself. He went by himself when the time came, and he came back, and he said, "Look Oliver, dry." That's a very important lesson, not just for flying. It tells you that you can overcome fear with knowledge. If you're nervous about doing something new in science, you might say, "This guy over here, he's much smarter than me. Or this lady, she knows what to do. I couldn't possibly do that." You're frightened. Go and learn. Go and read. You can do anything. You can change fields. You don't have to be stuck somewhere. Go away and overcome fear with knowledge. That's my motor glider, and here's my companion. And if you're lucky, you will have a companion as I have in Nobuyo, and that's where I stop. applause

Gut, wo fangen wir an? Ich werde Ihnen jetzt nicht erzählen, worum es sich bei dieser Folie handelt. Sie müssen heute Nachmittag kommen und wir können darüber reden. Aber der Titel meiner Rede lautet “Wo die Ideen herkommen” und es ist immer eine Frage, wo man anfängt. Und ich glaube, dies ist ein guter Platz, um zu beginnen, weil dies einer der erfreulichen Momente für einen Nobelpreisträger ist, wenn jemand wissen will, wo Sie in der Schule waren, und ich war hier in der Schule im Alter von 5 bis 11 Jahren. Und Sie enthüllten hier eine Tafel, ein Paar Kinder feiern hier mit mir. Es ist interessant für mich, weil ich schon in der Zeit, in der ich diese Schule an diesem Alter verließ, wusste, dass ich ein Wissenschaftler sein möchte, aber ich kannte das Wort nicht. Das Beste, was ich zur Sprache bringen konnte, war, dass ich ein Erfinder sein wollte. Dies war ein Ergebnis davon, dass ich Comics über Erfinder gelesen habe. Und dann möchte ich gerne, dass Sie sehen, wo ich aufgewachsen bin. Ich lebte in einem kleinen Ort namens Copley mit einer Einwohnerzahl von nur 1,500, und ich bin neugierig, wie viele von Ihnen aus einem so kleinen Ort kommen. Nicht sehr viele. Aber es war gut, an diesem Ort zu leben. Die Schule war etwa hier und mein Zuhause etwa hier und es gab dort einen schönen Fluss, den River Calder. Von der Tatsache abgesehen, dass er, als ich ein Kind war, schlimm verschmutzt gewesen ist, aber dies ist nicht mehr so und ich freue mich, dies zu sagen. Wenn Sie den River Calder abwärts gehen kommen Sie zu, hier ist Copley und hier ist der River Calder ... Sie kommen zu einer anderen Stadt, Elland, und Elland hat eine Einwohnerzahl von 15.000, ist also eine etwas größere Stadt. Und sie brachte im Jahr 1997 einen Nobelpreis in Chemie hervor. Wenn Sie von Copley stromaufwärts gehen, dann kommen Sie zu einer anderen Stadt, Todmorden, die ebenfalls eine Einwohnerzahl von ungefähr 15.000 hat. Und sie brachte zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Also ist es das Wasser? Offensichtlich nicht. (Gelächter). Die Antwort lautet: die Lehrer. Die Lehrer inspirieren Sie und ermuntern Sie zu denken. Und tatsächlich können wir uns die Lehrer betrachten, die mit all diesen Personen zu tun hatten. Und Smithies hatte einen guten Lehrer in der Grundschule und zwei Lehrer im Gymnasium. Und Walker hatte einen guten Lehrer für Wissenschaften. Und Cockcroft und Wilkinson hatten beide denselben Lehrer für Wissenschaften, dieser Lehrer für Wissenschaften unterrichtete also mehr als 20 Jahre lang und brachte sozusagen zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Wenn Sie also Lehrer sind, dann denken Sie daran, wieviel Einfluss Sie in der Zukunft haben können. Vielleicht werden Sie das Vergnügen haben, ein Lehrer zu sein und nicht vergessen zu werden. Vielleicht bringen Sie einen Nobelpreisträger hervor, wer weiß? Seien Sie also ein sorgfältiger Lehrer, wenn Sie Lehrer sind. Ich hatte einen großartigen Lehrer, als ich zur Universität ging. Ich ging in das Balliol College der Universität von Oxford. Und dies ist mein Lehrer, “Sandy” Ogston. Er war in Chemie ausgebildet und machte einen zweiten Hochschulabschluss in Physik und fing an, Studenten im medizinischen Fachbereich zu unterrichten und ich habe das Stipendium für die Hochschule mit Physik erhalten, aber aus einem Grund, der mir im Moment nicht einfällt, habe ich mich für die Medizin entschieden. Jedenfalls war Sandy Ogston mein Lehrer. Und er brachte einen Nobelpreis im Jahr 1976 und einen weiteren im Jahr 2007 hervor, manche Lehrer können Sie also wirklich inspirieren. Die Art und Weise, in der damals in Oxford unterrichtet wurde, und dies wird hauptsächlich noch so gemacht, ist wunderbar. Ich wünsche mir, wir könnten es überall auf der Welt so machen. Aber es ist eine teure Art des Unterrichts. Und es war einmal in der Woche, dass Sie Ihren Lehrer treffen konnten, in diesem Fall Sandy Ogston, und ihm oder ihr einen Essay vorlegen, den Sie in der vergangenen Woche über ein Ihnen zugeteiltes Thema geschrieben haben. Und es wurde von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas erstellen, was zu der ursprünglichen Literatur zurückgeht. Sie können nicht mit einem Lehrbuch arbeiten, oder Sie lesen vielleicht ein Lehrbuch oder eine Besprechung - aber es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas Neues schreiben. Sie erhalten vielleicht ein Thema “Schreiben Sie einen Aufsatz über Brot.” Und das ist alles, was man Ihnen sagt, und es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie einen tiefgründigen Artikel innerhalb einer Woche erstellen. (lacht) Sandy hat mir folgendes Thema zugeteilt: "Oliver, schreib mir einen Essay über Energie-Metabolismus”. Dies war jetzt vor der Veröffentlichung des Zyklus über Trikarbonsäurezyklus, vor dem Zyklus von Krebs. Und ich machte mich an die Arbeit. Und dann kam mir dies in die Quere. Und warum sollte ich Ihnen ein Buch zeigen? Ich zeige Ihnen dieses Buch, denn was in diesem Buch stand war so aufregend, dass ich mich daran erinnere, wo ich war, als ich es las. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Buch aussah. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Papier aussah. Es war so inspirierend, etwas zu lesen, was Sinn machte aus etwas, was Unsinn zu sein schien. Und der Unsinn war: Warum verbrennt der Körper nicht einfach Glukose und macht Kohlendioxid? Es ging durch all diese komplizierten Dinge durch das Hinzufügen von Phosphat und indem man dies und jenes tut. Und warum funktioniert es? Und dieses Buch enthält die Antwort. Die Antwort ist dieser kleine Schnörkel hier, P-Schnörkel, der energiereiches Phosphat bedeutet, eine energiereiche Phosphatverbindung. Und für die Chemiker ist es interessant, dass die energiereichen Verbindungen alle saure Anhydride sind. Und saure Anhydride sind sehr mächtige organische Stoffe, die sehr viel mehr Energie in sich bergen als es zum Beispiel die Phosphat-Ester haben würden. Und ganz vorbildlich erschien ich in der folgenden Woche mit einem Essay. Und darin stand der Zyklus von Smithies. Es war ein ziemlich smarter Zyklus, weil er mit einem anorganischen Phosphat begann und einen Phosphat-Ester bildete, welches eine relativ geringe Energie hatte. Und man nimmt ein Paar Wasserstoffe weg, und Sie können hier den Phosphat-Ester in ein saures Anhydrid umwandeln, und dies ist energiereich, daraus können Sie ATP machen. Und dann gehen Sie hier herum und fügen das Hydrogen hinten hinzu, und Sie können wieder von vorne anfangen und Sie könnten Energie aus nichts herstellen. Nun war ich nicht völlig dumm. Ich wusste, es war falsch, aber ich wusste nicht, warum es falsch war. Und dies war ein interessantes Problem. Und Sandy Ogston schrieb einen Artikel darüber, weil Menschen bei den Berechnungen vergessen haben, dass man an die Konzentration denken muss und nicht nur an was damals die standardmäßige freie Energie genannt wurde, bei der jede Komponente der Reaktion auf einer molaren Konzentration beruhte. Und er arbeitete heraus, dass es ein System geben musste, dass Energie schuf, indem sich Elektronen aufwärts in der elektromotorischen Skala bewegten, sozusagen in der Zelle. Und er sah die Wichtigkeit der Energie durch Konzentration voraus. Und er wurde sich klar darüber, dass das System nicht mit Substraten arbeiten könnte, die von ihren Enzymen getrennt sind. Und sie mussten übergeben werden ohne sich in freie Substrate zu zerlegen. Andernfalls hätten die Kinetiker sich geirrt, es war also ein guter Artikel. Und er veröffentlichte ihn und er war nett genug, meinen Namen als Schüler des Balliol College hinzuzufügen, und ich fühlte mich sehr gut dabei. Dies geschah im Jahr 1948, ist also schon eine ganze Weile her. Aber dann etwa um, sagen wir mal... das genaue Datum weiß ich nicht... aber sagen wir mal im Jahr 1990 etwa kam jemand auf mich zu und sagte, Und ich erwiderte ziemlich bescheiden: “Das stimmt schon, das bin ich”. Und er sagte; „Oh, ich dachte, Sie wären tot.“ (lacht) Und jedenfalls geht das Spiel weiter und hier ist meine Doktorarbeit und Sie können hier eine Menge bedeutender Zahlen sehen. Tatsächlich waren es sehr bedeutende Zahlen. Sie sind es nicht bedingt dadurch, dass sie in einem Computer abgerundet wurden, was eine gängige Methode ist, um viele signifikanten Werte zu erhalten. Aber Sie können sehen, dass meine experimentellen Punkte ziemlich gedrängt aneinander liegen und ich maß osmotischen Druck. Es ist nicht sehr wichtig zu wissen, was das ist, aber die Punkte waren so gedrängt, dass ich die Linie unterbrechen musste, um die theoretische Linie darauf zu setzen, und ich war auf diese sehr präzise Methode sehr stolz. Ich veröffentlichte es als “Ein dynamisches Osmometer für genaue Messungen”, ein ordentliches Papier. Es verzeichnete einen Rekord. Niemand hat es jemals zitiert. Niemand hat diese Methode wieder verwendet und auch ich habe diese Methode nie wieder verwendet. Sie müssen sich also fragen “Nun, worum geht es hier?” Und ich möchte, dass Sie einen Augenblick nachdenken. Nun, es geht hier darum, dass ich lernte, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben und ich genoss es. Und dies sind die kritischen Dinge in den frühen Stadien Ihrer Karriere, dass Sie lernen, gute Arbeit zu leisten und das gerne zu tun. Es ist nicht wichtig, was Sie tun. Das ist absolut unwichtig. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres wissenschaftlichen Mentors sein. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres Doktorvaters sein. Sie möchten Sie selbst sein, aber Sie können von diesen Leuten lernen, wie Sie gute Wissenschaft betreiben aber Sie müssen es genießen. Andernfalls werden Sie nicht die Leidenschaft haben, die Sie brauchen. Ich bitte Sie also dringend, wenn Sie nicht das tun, was Sie möchten, dann gehen Sie zu Ihrem Berater und sagen „Ich brauche ein anderes Thema, ich genieße es nicht.“ Wenn der Berater es nicht tun kann, dann wechseln Sie den Berater. Ich meine es ernst. Es ist so wichtig, weil es unwahrscheinlich ist und ich hoffe, dass Sie die Arbeit derselben Art tun werden, die Sie gemacht haben als Sie ein graduierter Student waren oder nach der Doktorarbeit. Sie benutzen vielleicht die Fertigkeit aber Sie hoffen, etwas anderes zu tun. Und ich habe dies in meiner Diplomarbeit oder nach der Doktorarbeit nicht geschafft. Meine Zeit nach der Doktorarbeit war nichts Ungewöhnliches, aber ich ging nach Toronto, um einen Job anzunehmen. Und dort erhielt ich einen Job durch David Scott und er hat frühzeitig auf dem Gebiet des Insulins gearbeitet, weil das Insulin in Toronto entdeckt wurde, und er war der Erste, der es herauskristallisierte und dauerhaftes Insulin herstellte. Und er sagte” “Sie können über alles forschen, solange es etwas mit Insulin zu tun hat." Und ich dachte Es hat wohl einen Vorläufer geben.” Wir wissen nun, dass es einen Vorläufer gibt. Aber falls Sie es erwarten: ich habe es nicht entdeckt - aber ich versuchte es. Und dabei musste ich einen Weg finden, auf Insulin zu schauen, ich dachte, ich würde etwas Neues mittels Elektrophorese finden. Und damals wurden viele Elektrophoresen auf Filterpapier durchgeführt, wo Sie ein Filterpapier mit Pufferlösung einweichen, das Protein dazugeben und ihm erlauben zu wandern und Sie sehen es verschmiert. Dies war wirklich kein gutes Ergebnis und ich war ziemlich frustriert. Und dann hörte ich von der Arbeit dieser beiden Herren: Kunkel und Slater und Sie hatten einen Kasten verwendet, einen Kasten dieser Größe, dieser Größe und so weiter. Und sie füllten ihn mit Stärke, etwa so wie einen Sandkasten, nur war es Stärke, und sie hatten Puffer darin und sie gaben die Prüfsubstanz in die Stärke. Und der Vorteil war, dass anders als beim Filterpapier ... Dies ist von ihrem Papier … Hier ist ein auf das Filterpapier aufgebrachte Protein und es verschmierte, genau wie mein Insulin verschmierte. Aber wenn Sie es wieder auf die Stärke geben taucht es wie ein deutlicher Zacken wieder auf. Aber um das Protein zu finden müssen Sie es in 40 Scheiben schneiden und auf jeder Scheibe eine Proteinermittlung durchführen und Sie müssen für einen Elektrophorese-Durchgang 40 Proteinermittlungen durchführen. Ich hatte in meinem Labor keine Spülmaschine, ich hatte keinen Techniker. Ich konnte dies nicht machen. Aber ich erinnere mich, meiner Mutter beim Wäschemachen geholfen zu haben; ich war zumindest anwesend... Sie nahm Pulver aus Stärke und kochte es mit heißem Wasser auf und machte eine schleimige Mischung, die für die Hemdenkragen meines Vaters angewendet wurde, die steif sein mussten, und so wurden sie gebügelt. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit wurde aus der Stärke ein Gallert. Und ich dachte “Ach du meine Güte, wenn ich ein Stärkegel aus der Stärke mache, es aufkoche, und es dann färben kann, dann werde ich dieses Problem der 40 Scheiben los.” Und am Samstagvormittag war ich damit durch. Und am Nachmittag begann ich mein erstes Experiment damit. Da gibt es einen Schnitt, und da ist das Insulin als ein nettes Band und ich machte den Vermerk Und dies war der Anfang der Elektrophorese mit Gel. Und als ich etwas später nur für einen groben Test fortfuhr hatte ich Plasma oder Serum darauf getan, und ich konnte die Bänder der Proteine sehen, die im Blut enthalten sind. Die Leute dachten, dass es fünf Proteine gibt: Albumin, Alpha-1, Alpha-2, Beta und Gamma Globulin. Wir wissen heute, dass es etwa 700 von ihnen gibt. Aber die Leute wussten damals von fünf und ich bekam diese Bänder und ich startete das Experiment wieder um Mitternacht... Und ich konnte immer arbeiten. Und, Entschuldigung, und dann ein wenig später organisierte ich es so, dass ich ein Muster in den Bändern erkannte, und ich hatte viele zu beschriftende Bänder. Ich konnte tatsächlich 11 Bänder finden und wenn Sie einen guten Chef haben, können Sie dann eine Schritt nach vorne gehen, denn ich ging zu Scottie, wir nannten uns damals gegenseitig Scottie und Oliver, ich ging zu Scottie und sagte zu ihm: “Scottie, ich habe wirklich etwas sehr Interessantes gefunden. Ich möchte gerne mit der Arbeit am Insulin aufhören und an diesem Problem arbeiten.” Und er sagte, er war ein guter Wissenschaftler “Mach auf alle Fälle den Wechsel” und ich hoffe, dass Sie diese Möglichkeit auch haben. Sehen Sie, als mir das widerfuhr, war meine Doktorarbeit lange her … Es gibt den einen Augenblick und Sie erkennen, dass Sie etwas gefunden haben, das Sie dazu führen sollte etwas ganz Neues zu tun. Und ich war soweit, meine Arbeit zu veröffentlichen und dies waren zwei meiner Freunde. Ich hatte genug davon, selbst zu bluten, und so bekam ich Blut von meinen Freunden. Und ich denke, dafür sind sie da, oder nicht? Und dies sind George Connell und Gordon Dixon, und warum gibt es keine Fotos? Mein Labor hatte keine Kamera. Es war damals ein so karges Labor. Aber ich war bereit zu veröffentlichen und Fotos machen zu lassen. Und dann führte ich zufälligerweise ein Experiment mit Beth Wades Blutprobe durch und seltsamerweise gab es viele zusätzliche Bänder. Und was war an Beth Wades Blut anders? Es handelte sich um eine Frau. Es war das erste Mal, dass ich eine Probe einer Frau untersuchte. Ich dachte, ich habe eine neue Methode gefunden, um Männer von Frauen zu unterscheiden. Und ich nannte ein Muster das M-Muster und das andere das W-Muster: M für männlich, W für weiblich. Und ich konnte etwa eine Woche lang etwa zwei Proben täglich untersuchen, männlich und weiblich passten immer gut zusammen. Und dann beim sechsten Mal war alles ganz anders. Und der Mann änderte sich in eine Frau. Wir machten es ihm nicht leicht. Komm schon, Casey, schau dir das an. Aber Sie sagen vielleicht, so ist die Jugend. Aber hier ist mein Datenblatt. Ganz bemerkenswert, aber es zeigte sich, dass der Unterschied zwischen den Typen mit dem Geschlecht nichts zu tun hat. Es hatte mit den existierenden Blutgruppen nichts zu tun und es war offenbar etwas Neues. Und ich zeige dies aus einem anderen Grund. Es ist ein Datenblatt, das jetzt fast 60 Jahre alt ist. Sie können Ihr Datenblatt nicht 60 Jahre verfügbar halten, wenn sie keinen Ausdruck machen. Sie müssen Ausdrucke machen von den wichtigen Daten, die Sie haben. Verlassen Sie sich nicht auf Ihren Computer, weil Sie einen Floppy jetzt nicht lesen können, und es gab einen Moment, da hatten wir genau das. Sie werden ganz bestimmt eine CD-ROM in 10 Jahren nicht lesen können. Machen Sie einige Ausdrucke und bewahren Sie gute Ausdrucke auf. Diese Unterschiede, die es hier gab, stellten sich als genetisch bedingt heraus. Und, nur um die Geschichte zu beenden, es war ein ziemlich komplizierter genetischer Unterschied und wir arbeiten daran mit Hilfe von Norma Ford-Walker, die eine hervorragende Genetikerin war und mir Genetik unterrichtet hatte. Und dann, weil die Dinge sich weiterentwickelten, vorher konnten wir keine Protein-Sequenzierung durchführen, jetzt konnten wir Proteine sequenzieren, Gene isolieren, Gene sequenzieren, und es wurde klar, dass es da etwas gab, was man damit tun könnte. Linus Pauling und Harvey Itano und Vernon zum Beispiel zeigten, dass die Sichelzellmutation aus einer Umwandlung der Glutaminsäure in ein Valin im Globinmolekül herrührte. Und ich begann zu glauben, dass es möglich sein sollte, das Gen durch Gentargeting zu korrigieren. Wir sind nun in dem Stadium, in dem wir eine geklonte DNA, eine normale DNA hatten. Und ich dachte, wenn ich einen Teil einer normalen DNA einführe, könnte ich eine Art Genaustausch bekommen, das SA und GE aneinanderzureihen und das schlechte Gen in ein gutes Gen durch Genaustausch umzuwandeln. Ich wusste, dass es in der Hefe möglich ist und Jack war heute hier … Ich weiß nicht, ob er heute unter den Zuhörern ist, Aber Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver zeigten, dass Sie in der Hefe ein Gen modifizieren konnten, und ich habe gelehrt und dass dann so auch unterrichten. Aber das Hefe-Genom ist ungefähr zwei Größenordnungen kleiner als das menschliche Genom. Und es war daher nicht klar, ob es in einem Menschen durchgeführt werden konnte. Und dann wieder, wenn man über “Woher kommen Ideen” spricht... Sie müssen verstehen, wenn Sie unterrichten. Und um zu verstehen, müssen Sie manchmal viel Zeit damit verbringen, ein Papier zu lesen, bevor sie es gut genug verstehen, um es zu unterrichten. Und dies war ein Papier, dass am 1. April 1982 veröffentlicht wurde, und sie sprachen über eine Methode, ein Gen zu befreien, und, ich kann aus Zeitgründen nicht ins Detail gehen, abgesehen davon, dass es das Auffinden eines Teiles blauer DNA beinhaltete, die sozusagen der roten DNA am nächsten ist. Die rote DNA war das, was sie isolieren wollten, und es war die blaue DNA, die sie gewöhnlich fanden. Und ich dachte, dass ich diese Methode für Tests des Genaustausches verwenden kann. Daher gibt es nur drei Wochen, nachdem dieses Papier veröffentlicht wurde, eine Probe für die Gen-Platzierung. Und meine Idee war, daraus die blaue DNA zu verwenden, die in Bakterien zu finden war, und zu versuchen, auf das Beta Globin-Gen abzuzielen und dieses Fragment zu suchen. Ich sollte sagen: dies ist hereinkommende DNA, dies ist das Zielobjekt. Wenn ich ein DNA finden könnte, wo diese beide kombiniert sind, würde ich bewiesen haben, dass die Modifizierung erfolgt ist, da dies nicht auf der hereinkommenden DNA geschehen ist und nicht auf dem Ziel. Und mit einer Menge Arbeit gehen wir tiefer und kommen zur Stufe, auf der wir es vereinfachen, und wir haben eine eher einfaches Plasmid verwendet, das sehr ähnlich aussieht wie das von Terry Orr-Weaver benutzte, und Sie können sehen, dass, wenn Sie das Gen treffen, dies ist eine Abbildung der Enzymbegrenzung, dass Sie ein DNA-Fragment isolieren können, das 11 Kilobasen sein würde, wenn Sie nicht auf das Gen treffen würden. Wenn Sie auf das Gen treffen dann würde die Größe acht Kilobasen sein. Und eine lange Reihe von Experimenten führt zu dem Tag schließlich, als ich an einem Samstag einen Film mit Tests verschiedener Kolonien entwickelte, und es gab einen, wo das Fragment jetzt eine Länge von sieben, acht Kilobasen hat statt mehr, so wurde bewiesen, dass Gentargeting möglich war. Und sobald Sie bewiesen haben, dass dies möglich ist, können Sie es verwenden und andere Leute werden beginnen, es zu verwenden. Aber die Frequenz war hoffnungslos niedrig und für den ursprünglichen Zweck nicht praktisch, der darin bestand, einer Person mit Sichelzellanämie zu helfen. Also was tun? Mit jemand anderem sprechen und ich las über das Werk von Martin Evans, der eine Embryo-Stammzelle verwendet hat. Hier ist eine Blastocyste. Dies ist der Teil der Blastocyste, aus dem der Embryo entsteht. Und Martin Evans und seine Studenten zeigten wie diese zu kultivieren sind, um auf diese Weise diese Zellen einer cremefarbigen Maus zu kultivieren. Und wenn er diese cremefarbigen Stammzelle in eine Blastocyste einfügen, würden sie sich daran erinnern, woher sie kommen, und Sie können aus dieser Blastocyste eine Maus erschaffen, indem sie sie in eine weibliche Maus einsetzen, und Sie würden chimärische Mäuse erhalten, Mischungen. Und von ihnen können Sie das Gen züchten, an dem Sie interessiert sind. Und dies war etwas Offensichtliches. Lasst uns eine Methode verwenden, um Gene zu verändern. Aber die Probe war furchtbar. Und so brauchten wir Hilfe von einem Chemiker und wir bekamen Hilfe von Kary Mullis, der den Nobelpreis für die Erfindung der Polymerase-Kettenreaktion erhielt. Und hier ist eine kleine Stelle in einem meiner Notizbücher, die besagt, dass Sie diese Methode verwenden können, um die rekombinante Passage zu lokalisieren. Und ich baute den Apparat, um dies zu tun. Dies ist mein Apparat. Warum würden Sie einen Apparat bauen? Nun, der Grund war, dass keiner zur Verfügung stand. Sie können keinen Apparat kaufen, um die Polymerase-Kettenreaktion zu machen. Aber ich glaube dass man dieses Schild anbringen sollte. Meine Kollegen taten es bei dem Apparat, der auf dem Boden lag. Und da steht NBGBOKFO “no bloody good, but okay for Oliver”, weil ich immer Material aus Abfall machen würde, wie Sie sehen, und das alles sind Gegenstände aus dem Abfall. Nichts davon ist neu und dies ist noch der Apparat, den wir benutzten für den Nobelpreis. Die Methode war gut und hier ist ein Superartikel darüber und Sie merken, dass ich nicht der Autor bin. Es freut mich zu sagen, dass die Autorin hier unten steht. Sie ist meine Frau und sie kam und schuf ein aufsehenerregendes Tier, das Atherosklerose bekommen kann. Nun, wohin nun? Ich zeige Ihnen auch diese Sache, weil es noch ein bisschen mehr gibt, worüber man reden kann. Hier ist Sandy Ogston wieder, aber hier gibt es jetzt einen kleinen Unterschied, weil hier auch sein Todesdatum steht. Weil er sagte “Wenn ich sterbe, Oliver, möchte ich gerne, dass Du meine wissenschaftlichen Memoiren schreibst”. Und dies war etwas, was die Royal Society gerne haben wollte. Und dann müssen Sie all diese Papers lesen. Und ich las alles von ihm aus seinen Papers. Und dann hatte er diese schöne kleine Formel hier, die über den verfügbaren Raum in einem Gel in Molekülen von einem Radius R spricht, wenn das Gel aus Fasern des Radius r besteht, und es gibt n Fasern pro Quadratzentimeter. Und er sprach über einen Querschnitt des Gels. Und diese Gleichung ist berückend genau. Sie funktioniert für jedes Gel, von dem Sie je gehört haben und wurde ausgiebig getestet. Diese zwei Herren in meinem Labor machten ein Diagramm, um sie zu veranschaulichen, und ich mochte es. Wenn Sie eine kleine gelöste Substanz haben, kann sie eine Menge Raum in einem Gel vorfinden. Aber wenn Sie eine große gelöste Substanz haben kann es nur einen begrenzten Raum vorfinden. Und ich dachte, dass dies auf die Niere angewendet werden könnte und ich schrieb ein Paper darüber, dass die Idee darin bestünde, dass hier kleine Moleküle leicht durch die Niere gehen würden. Und große Moleküle würden eine ziemlich niedrige Konzentration haben, wenn sie durch ein Gel gehen müssen und ich veröffentlichte ein Diagramm, das das Prinzip veranschaulichte. Dies ist ein Querschnitt einer Niere in EM-Auflösung. Und dies sind die Größen der Albumin-Moleküle, im Maßstab, und dies ist das Gel in der Niere, durch die, wie ich dachte, der Vorgang erfolgen würde. Und ich ging zu unserem Spezialisten für kolloidales Gold, das ich verwenden wollte, um sie in dem Elektronmikroskop zu sehen. Und er sagte, ich werde sie nicht für dich machen, Oliver. Sie machen ihre eigenen. Er sagte “Du wirst mehr lernen, wenn Du sie machst.” Ich war total begeistert. Es gibt wunderbare interessante Dinge und ich verbrachte einen großen Teil meiner Zeit mit ihnen. Ich werde Ihnen hier nur ein Beispiel zeigen. Dies war vor vier Jahren. Und dies war die Zeit, als ich zu lernen begann … Arbeitete immer noch am Wochenende. Das war der Zeit als ich herausfand, dass ich die Größe eines Moleküls kontrollieren konnte, indem ich die Zeitdauer der Reaktion im Verfahren variierte. Ich machte daraus in Langmuir ein Paper und ich bin der erste Autor. Und ich bin der erste Autor, weil ich die Arbeit gemacht habe, nicht weil ich das Paper geschrieben habe, sondern weil die Experimente meine waren, die meisten von ihnen. Denken Sie also darüber nach. Es ist wirklich nett, in einem Paper mit 89 Jahren der Hauptverfasser zu sein, und besonders wenn es das erste Paper ist, dass ich je in einer Chemie-Zeitschrift veröffentlicht habe. Aber ich habe noch etwas … Oh, hier ist ein Beispiel, an dem man arbeiten sollte. Hier ist ein Plasma mit großen Molekülen in Clustern und sie können nicht in die Basalmembran eindringen. Es ist komplizierter als das, aber dies ist ein Beispiel. Ich habe eine letzte kleine Sache, die ich Ihnen zeigen will, und hier ist es. Und warum zeige ich ein Flugzeug dafür? Es ist zum Teil, weil es ein Teil meines Lebens ist, aber dies ist mein Lehrer, Field Morey. Und er brachte mir das Fliegen bei, und ich war ein nervöser Flieger. Als ich lernte mit ihm zu fliegen, hier sitzt der Lehrer und der Schüler sitzt auf dem linkem Sitz. Schweiß strömte mir aus allen Poren, ich meine es wörtlich. Und so wandte ich mich eines Tages an ihn und sagte: „Dies war ein guter Tag für Sie. Nur ein Tropfen ist abgefallen.“ Und das führte mich zu einem Gedanken. Ich habe später gelernt, Lehrer zu sein, und ich hatte einen Schüler, Jeff Bloch. Und als wir zusammen flogen, ich brachte ihm das Gleiten bei, kam er komplett durchnässt zurück. Er klebte richtig an der Rückenlehne. Er flog dann irgendwann selbst und sagte später zu mir “Schau, Oliver, trocken.” Dies ist eine sehr interessante Lektion, nicht nur für das Fliegen. Sie zeigt Ihnen, dass Sie mit Wissen Angst bewältigen können. Wenn Sie nervös dabei sind, wenn Sie etwas Neues in der Wissenschaft machen, dann könnten Sie sagen “Dieser Kerl hier, er ist viel schlauer als ich. Oder diese Dame, sie weiß, was zu tun ist. Ich könnte das möglicherweise nicht tun”. Sie sind ängstlich. Gehen Sie, lernen Sie. Gehen Sie, lesen Sie. Sie können alles. Sie können Felder ändern. Sie müssen nicht irgendwo festgefahren sein. Gehen Sie und überwinden Sie Angst durch Wissen. Dies ist mein Motorgleiter und hier ist mein Freund. Und wenn Sie Glück haben werden Sie einen Freund haben wie ich ihn in Nobuyo habe und an dieser Stelle höre ich auf. Applaus

Oliver Smithies on becoming a first author of a research paper at the age of 89
(00:31:48 - 00:32:24)

 

 

7) Interpersonal Skills 

Not all of the advice for a career in science is related to the research itself and how to go about it. It is increasingly recognised that excellence in science is only one element of a successful scientific career. Scientists must be excellent communicators – both oral and written, they must be able to prioritise and juggle many responsibilities at once and they must also have the people skills to allow them to lead and inspire their own research group as well as interact with other scientists and with lay people.

 

 

 

 

8) Teach!

‘Those who can’t do, teach’? Not according to some Nobel Laureates. Both Oliver Smithies and Dan Shechtman have stressed the importance of teaching others both for selfish reasons, i.e., as a way of ensuring that you really understand a topic, but also as a way of contributing to humanity. Teaching shouldn’t be seen as chore or as a necessary evil but rather as a fulfilling task of great importance that ensures that the love of science is inculcated into coming generations.

 

Oliver Smithies (2015) - Ideas Come from Many Places

Well, where to begin? I'm not going to tell you what this slide is about. You'd have to come this afternoon, and we can talk about it. But "Where Do Ideas Come From" is the title of my talk, and it's always a question of where to begin. And I think this is a good place to begin because this is one of the joyful times that happens to a Nobel Laureate that somebody decides they would like to remember where you were at school, and I was at school here from age 5 to 11. And they unveiled a plaque here, and some of the kids are there celebrating with me. It's interesting to me because I already knew by the time I left this school at that age that I wanted to be a scientist, but I didn't know the word. The best I could come up with was I wanted to be an inventor, as a result of reading comic strips about inventors. And then I'd like you to see where it was that I lived. I lived in a little village called Copley with a population of only 1,500, and I'm curious, how many of you guys come from a village as small as that? Not very many. But it was a good place to live. The school was about over here, and my home was up here, and there was a rather lovely river there, the River Calder, except for the fact that when I was a kid it was badly polluted, though it no longer is I'm happy to say. If you go down this River Calder, you come to, there's Copley, and here is the River Calder... You come to another town, Elland, and Elland has a population of 15,000, so it's a rather bigger town. And it produced a Nobel Laureate in 1997 in chemistry. If you go upstream from Copley, you come to another town, Todmorden, that also has a population of about 15,000. It produced two Nobel Laureates. So the water? Obviously not. (laughs) The teachers is the answer. The teachers inspire you and give you all sorts of thoughts. And in fact, we can look at the teachers that were involved in all of these persons. And Smithies had a good teacher in elementary school and two teachers in high school. And Walker had a good science teacher. And Cockcroft and Wilkinson both had the same science teacher, so that science teacher was teaching for more than 20 years and produced, as it were, two Nobel Laureates. So if you're a teacher, think how much influence you can have in the future. Maybe you will have the enjoyment of being a teacher and being remembered. Maybe you'll produce a Nobel Laureate, who knows? So be a careful teacher when you're a teacher. I had a grand teacher when I went to college. I went to college in Oxford University, Balliol College. And this is my teacher, "Sandy" Ogston. He was trained in chemistry and then took a second degree in physiology and began to teach students, in the medical curriculum, and I had won my scholarship to the college with physics, but I for some reason that escapes me now, I decided to do medicine. Anyway, "Sandy" Ogston was my teacher. And he produced a Nobel Laureate in 1976 and another one in 2007, so some teachers can really inspire you. The way of teaching at that time in Oxford, and it still is the primary way, is a marvellous way, and I wish we could do it more easily all over the world. But it's an expensive way of teaching. And that is that once a week, you would meet with your teacher, in this case "Sandy" Ogston and present to him or her an essay that you had written over the preceding week on a topic that had been assigned to you. And you were expected to produce something that went back to the original literature. You couldn't work with a textbook, or you might read a textbook, you might read a review, but you were expected to write something original. Might get a topic, "Oh, write me an essay on pain." And that's all you'll be told, and you were expected to produce a learned article in a week. (laughs) Well Sandy set me the topic, "Write me an essay, Oliver, on energy metabolism." Now this was before the tricarboxylic acid cycle had been published, before Krebs' cycle. And I set about this task. And then I came across this. And why would I show you a book? I show you this book because what's in this book was so exciting that I remember where I was when I read it. I remember what the book looked like. I remember what the paper looked like. It was so inspiring to read something that made sense out of what appeared to be nonsense. And the nonsense was: Why doesn't the body just burn glucose and make carbon dioxide? It goes through all these complicated things of adding phosphate and doing this and that and the other. And why does it do it? And this book contains the answer. The answer is this little squiggle here, squiggle P, which means energy-rich phosphate, an energy-rich phosphate bond. And for the chemists, it's interesting that the energy-rich ones are all acid anhydrides, and acid anhydrides are very powerful organic compounds, have much more energy in them, for example, than a phosphate ester would have. And anyway, true to form, I came back with an essay the following week. And in it, I had Smithies' cycle. And it was rather a neat cycle because you could start with an inorganic phosphate and make a phosphate ester, and that's relatively low energy and take away a couple of hydrogens. And you can convert the phosphate ester into an acid anhydride here, and that's energy rich, from which you could make ATP. And then go around here and add the hydrogen back, and you could start over again, and you could produce energy for nothing. Well, I wasn't completely stupid. I did know it was wrong, but I didn't know why it was wrong. And that was an interesting problem. And "Sandy" Ogston proceeded to write an article on it eventually because it turned out that people had forgotten in making the calculations that you had to think about the concentration of things, not just about what was called standard free energies in those days, where every reaction component was at one molar concentration. And he worked out that there had to be a system that produced energy in moving electrons up the electromotive scale, you might say, in the cell. So he foresaw the importance of energy by concentration, and he also realised that the system wouldn't work if the substrates dissociated from their enzymes. They had to be handed over as it were without dissociating into free substrate. Otherwise, the kinetics would be wrong, so it was a good article. And he published it, and he was kind enough to add my name as a scholar of Balliol College, and I felt pretty good about this. And then this was 1948, so it's quite a long time ago. But then somewhere around about, oh let's say, I don't know the exact date, but say 1990 or thereabout somebody came up to me and said, you see 1990 would be And I rather modestly said, "Well as a matter of fact, I am." And he said, "Oh I thought you were dead." (laughs) So anyway, on with the game, and here's my PhD thesis, and you can see a lot of significant figures here. And in fact those are real significant figures. They're not due to not rounding off in a computer, which is the common method of getting many significant figures. But you can see that my experimental points are really rather closely together, and I was measuring osmotic pressure. It's not very important to know what that is, but the points were so close that I had to interrupt the line to put the theoretical line on, so I was very proud of this super precision method. And I published it, "A Dynamic Osmometer for Accurate Measurements," a neat paper. It has a record. Nobody ever quoted it. Nobody ever used the method again, and I never used the method again. So you have to ask yourself, "Well what was the point of it?" And I want you to think a moment. Well the point of it was that I learned to do good science, and I enjoyed it. And those are the critical things in the early stages of your career that you learn to do good work and to enjoy it. It does not matter what you do. It's absolutely unimportant. You do not want to be a clone of your advisor. You do not want to be a clone of your post-doctoral advisor. You want to be yourself, but you can learn from these people how to do good science, but you must be enjoying it. Otherwise, you won't have that fire that's needed. So I urge you, if you aren't doing what you like, go to your advisor and say, "I need another problem. I'm not enjoying it." If your advisor can't do that, change your advisor. I'm serious. It's so important because it's very unlikely, and I hope it is true that you will do work of the same type that you did when you were a graduate student or when you were a postdoc. You may use the skill, but you hope to do something different. And I didn't achieve that in my graduate work or in my postdoc. My postdoc was equally undistinguished, but I went to Toronto to get a job. And there I was given a job by David Scott, and he was an early worker in the field of insulin work because insulin was discovered in Toronto, and he was the first person to crystalize it and make a long-lasting insulin. And he said, "You can work on anything you like as long as it has something to do with insulin." And I thought, There might be a precursor." Well, we now know there is a precursor. But in case you're waiting, I did not discover it, but I tried. And on the way, I had to find a way of looking at insulin, thinking I would find something slightly different in electrophoresis. And in those days, much electrophoresis was done on filter paper, where you would soak a filter paper with buffer, apply the protein, and allow it to migrate, and you can it just unrolled like a smear and really was very poor, and I was rather frustrated. And then I heard of the work of these two gentlemen: Kunkel and Slater, and they'd use a box, a box about this big, this big and so on. And they filled it full of starch grains, rather like a sandbox, except there were grains of starch, and they had buffer around it, and they applied the sample in the starch. And the advantage was that unlike the filter paper... This is from their paper... Here's a protein applied on filter paper, and it smeared, just as my insulin smeared. But when they put it on the starch grain, it came out as a nice peak. But in order to find the protein, you had to cut it up into 40 slices and do a protein determination on every slice, so you had to do 40 protein determinations for one electrophoresis run. I didn't even have a dishwasher in my lab, didn't have a technician. I couldn't do that. But I remembered helping my mother do the laundry, well I was there anyway. She took starch powder and cooked it up with hot water and made a slimy mix, which was used to apply to collars of my father's shirts, which needed to be stiff, and so it was ironed. And when you tied it up at the end of the day, the starch, it set into a jelly. And I thought, "Well my gosh, if I go back and make a starch gel out of the starch, cook it up, and then I can stain it, and I will get rid of all of that problem of 40 slices." Saturday morning was when I had that. And by the afternoon, I'd started my first experiment with it. There is a slot, and there is the insulin as a nice band and made the remark, And that was the beginning of gel electrophoresis. It went on because some time later just for a rough test, I put plasma or serum onto it, and I could see the bands that were known of the proteins that were known to be present in blood at that time. People thought there were five proteins: albumin, alpha-1, alpha-2, beta, and gamma globulin. We now know there are about 700 or something like that. But anyway at that time, people thought five, and I got these bands and set it up again, oh 12 midnight. And I could work at any time. And excuse me, and then a little bit later, I managed to see this sort of a pattern with many bands, and I had too many bands to label. In fact, I could find 11 all together, and here's when if you have a good boss, you can really make a step forward because I went to Scottie, as by then he and I called each other Scottie and Oliver. I went to Scottie and said, "Scottie, I've really found something very interesting. I'd like to stop working on insulin and work on this problem." And he said, he was a good scientist, "By all means, change", and that I hope you have that experience. You see I was long past my postdoc when it happened to me... That you get a time when you see you found something that you ought to do that's different from what has happened in the past. And I was ready to publish my work, and these are two of my friends. I got tired of bleeding myself and so I got blood from my friends. And I mean that's what they're for, isn't it? And that's George Connell and Gordon Dixon, and why aren't there photographs? My lab didn't own a camera. It was such a poor lab at that time. But I was about ready to get ready to publish and getting photographs made. And then just by chance, I ran another sample from BW, and it was very strange, many extra bands. And so what was funny about BW? It was a woman. This is the first time that I'd run a sample from a woman. I thought I found a new method of telling men from women. And I called one pattern the M pattern and the other pattern the F pattern: M for male, F for female. And I could do two samples in a day for about a week or so, male and female always fit right. And then the sixth time, they were changed. And the man had changed into a woman. We gave him a real hard time. Come on Casey. Let's have look. But anyway, such is youth you might say. But here is my data file. Just remarkable, but it turned out the difference between the types had nothing to do with gender. It had nothing to do with the existing blood groups, and it was obviously something new. And I show this for another reason. It's a data file that's now, well what, almost 60 years old. You won't be able to produce your data file 60 years from now if you don't make a hard copy. You got to make hard copies of the important data that you have. Don't rely on your computer because you can't read a floppy disc now, and there was a time when that was what we had. You won't be able to read a CD in 10 years from now, for sure. Make some hard copies and keep good hard copies. Well those differences that were here turned out to be genetic. And just to close this story, it was a rather complicated genetic difference, and we worked it out with the help of Norma Ford-Walker, who was a marvellous geneticist and taught me genetics. And then as things moved on, we changed from not being able to do protein sequencing to be able to protein sequence, isolating genes, sequencing gene, and it began to become clear that there was something that one might do about this. For example, Linus Pauling and Harvey Itano and Vernon Ingram showed that the sickle cell mutation was just due to a change of glutamic acid to a valine in the globin molecule. And I began to think it ought to be possible to correct the gene by gene targeting. We now are at a stage where we had cloned DNA, a normal DNA. And I thought if I introduce a piece of normal DNA, I might be able to get some crossing over, so SA lining up with SA and GE and change the bad gene into the good gene by crossing over. I knew it was possible in yeast, and Jack is here today... I don't know whether he's here in the audience now, but Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver had shown that in yeast you could target a gene, and I was teaching, so I had taught this. But the yeast genome is about, well what, two orders of magnitude smaller than the human genome. And so whether it could be done in a human was not at all clear. And then again in teaching "Where do ideas come from?" When you teach, you have to understand. And in order to understand, you sometimes have to spend a long time reading a paper before you can understand it well enough to teach it. And this was a paper that came out April 1st in 1982, and they talked about a method of rescuing a gene, and I can't go into the details, except to say, because of time, that it involved finding a piece of blue DNA, you might say, next to red DNA. The red DNA was what they wanted to isolate, and the blue DNA was what they used to find it. And I thought that I could use this method for gene targeting tests. So here's, only three weeks after that paper came out, an assay for gene placement. And my idea was to use their blue DNA, which you could score in bacteria and try to target the beta globin gene and look for this fragment. I should say: this is incoming DNA, this is the target. If I could find a piece of DNA where these two were together, I would've proved that targeting had occurred because this was not on the incoming DNA, and this was not on the target. And with quite a lot of work, we got further down and got to the stage of simplifying it and used a rather simpler plasmid, which looks very like the one that Terry Orr-Weaver had used, and you could see that if you hit the gene, this is a restriction enzyme map that in the right way, you could isolate a fragment of DNA that would be 11 kilobases if you didn't hit the gene. If you hit the gene, then the size would be eight kilobases. And a long set of experiments led to the final day, when on a Saturday when I developed a film of testing different colonies, and there is the one where the fragment is now a seven, eight kilobases long instead of larger, so this proved that gene targeting was possible. And once you've proved something is possible, then you can go and use it, and other people will start to do it. But the frequency was hopelessly low and not practical for the original purpose, which was to try to help a person with sickle cell anaemia. So what to do? Talk to somebody else, and I went and read about Martin Evans' work, which was using an embryonic stem cell. Here is a blastocyst. That's the part of the blastocyst that will give rise to the embryo. And what Martin Evans and his students learned how to culture those in culture, so that he had these cells growing in culture from a cream-coloured mouse. And if you put these cream-coloured stem cells back into a blastocyst, they would remember where they came from, and you could generate a mouse from this blastocyst by putting it back into a pseudopregnant female, and you would get chimeric mice, mixtures. And from them, you could breed out the gene that you were interested in. So that was an obvious thing. Let's use this method to alter gene. But the assay was terrible. And so we had to have help from a chemist, and we got help from Kary Mullis, who got the Nobel Prize for inventing polymerase chain reaction. And here is a little place in one of my notebooks, saying that we could use this method to detect the recombinant. And I made an apparatus to do it. This is my apparatus. Why would you make an apparatus? Well the reason was there wasn't one available. You could not get an apparatus for doing PCR. But I think this ought to have this label on it because that's what my graduate student friends used to put on an apparatus that was lying somewhere on the floor. And it stands for NBGBOKFO, no bloody good, but okay for Oliver because I would always make stuff out of junk, you see, and so these are all junk things. None of them were new, and yet that's the apparatus which we used and helped me towards the Nobel Prize. The method was good, and here's a super article about it, and you notice I'm not an author. I'm happy to say the author is down there. She's my wife, and she went and made a marvellous animal that could get atherosclerosis. Well, so where to? Well, I'm showing you this one more thing because I have one little more topic to talk about. Here's "Sandy" Ogston again, but there's a little difference now because I've got the date of his death. Because he asked, "When I die, Oliver, I'd like you to write my scientific memoirs." That was something that the Royal Society liked to have. And then you have to read all of his papers. And I read all his of his papers. And then he had this beautiful, little formula here, talking about the available space in a gel to molecules of radius big R when the gel is composed of fibres of radius little r, and there are n fibres per square centimetre. He was talking about a cross section of the gel. And this equation is beautifully precise. It worked in every gel you ever heard of and has been tested inordinately. These two guys in my lab, and they made this diagram to illustrate it, and I like it. If you have a small solute, it can find lots of space in a gel. But if you have a large solute, it can only find a limited space. And so I thought this might apply to the kidney, and I wrote a paper on this that the idea being that here the small molecules would come through the kidney easily. And big molecules, if they had to pass through a gel, would come rather low concentration, and I published a diagram illustrating the principle. This is a cross section of a kidney at electron microscope dimension. And these are the sizes of albumin molecules drawn to scale, and this is the gel in the kidney through which I thought the thing might happen. And so I went to our local person who was an expert in making a gold nanoparticle, which I wanted to use, to see in the electron microscope. And he said, I'm not going to make them for you, Oliver. You make your own. He said, "You'll learn more if you make them." I got hooked. They're marvellous, interesting things, and I spent a large amount of my personal time on them. I'll just show you one example here. That's what, four years ago. And this was the time when I first learned... Was still working at the weekend. This is the time when I found out that I could control the size of the molecule by varying the time of a reaction step in the procedure. I got a paper out of it in Langmuir, and I'm the first author. And I'm the first author because I did the work, not because I wrote the paper, though I did, but because the experiments were mine, most of them. And so, think about it. It's really rather neat to have a first author paper when you're 89 and especially if this is the first paper I ever published in a chemistry journal. But I have one more... Oh there's an example of working of it. Here is plasma with the large molecules in clusters, and they can't get into the basement membrane. It's more complicated than that, but that's an example. I've one last, a little thing to show you, and that's this. And what am I showing an aeroplane for? Wel,l partly because that's been a part of my life, but this is my instructor, Field Morey. And he taught me to fly, and I was a nervous flyer. And when I learned to fly with him, instructor sits here, and the pupil sit in the left seat. And sweat used to pour off me, I mean literally. And so one day I turned to him and said, "That was a good day for you. Only one drop dripped." That gives you some idea. Well, I later on learned to be an instructor, and I had a pupil, Jeff Bloch. And when we went flying together, I was teaching him to glide, he would come back absolutely sodden. His back would be completely sticking to himself. He went by himself when the time came, and he came back, and he said, "Look Oliver, dry." That's a very important lesson, not just for flying. It tells you that you can overcome fear with knowledge. If you're nervous about doing something new in science, you might say, "This guy over here, he's much smarter than me. Or this lady, she knows what to do. I couldn't possibly do that." You're frightened. Go and learn. Go and read. You can do anything. You can change fields. You don't have to be stuck somewhere. Go away and overcome fear with knowledge. That's my motor glider, and here's my companion. And if you're lucky, you will have a companion as I have in Nobuyo, and that's where I stop. applause

Gut, wo fangen wir an? Ich werde Ihnen jetzt nicht erzählen, worum es sich bei dieser Folie handelt. Sie müssen heute Nachmittag kommen und wir können darüber reden. Aber der Titel meiner Rede lautet “Wo die Ideen herkommen” und es ist immer eine Frage, wo man anfängt. Und ich glaube, dies ist ein guter Platz, um zu beginnen, weil dies einer der erfreulichen Momente für einen Nobelpreisträger ist, wenn jemand wissen will, wo Sie in der Schule waren, und ich war hier in der Schule im Alter von 5 bis 11 Jahren. Und Sie enthüllten hier eine Tafel, ein Paar Kinder feiern hier mit mir. Es ist interessant für mich, weil ich schon in der Zeit, in der ich diese Schule an diesem Alter verließ, wusste, dass ich ein Wissenschaftler sein möchte, aber ich kannte das Wort nicht. Das Beste, was ich zur Sprache bringen konnte, war, dass ich ein Erfinder sein wollte. Dies war ein Ergebnis davon, dass ich Comics über Erfinder gelesen habe. Und dann möchte ich gerne, dass Sie sehen, wo ich aufgewachsen bin. Ich lebte in einem kleinen Ort namens Copley mit einer Einwohnerzahl von nur 1,500, und ich bin neugierig, wie viele von Ihnen aus einem so kleinen Ort kommen. Nicht sehr viele. Aber es war gut, an diesem Ort zu leben. Die Schule war etwa hier und mein Zuhause etwa hier und es gab dort einen schönen Fluss, den River Calder. Von der Tatsache abgesehen, dass er, als ich ein Kind war, schlimm verschmutzt gewesen ist, aber dies ist nicht mehr so und ich freue mich, dies zu sagen. Wenn Sie den River Calder abwärts gehen kommen Sie zu, hier ist Copley und hier ist der River Calder ... Sie kommen zu einer anderen Stadt, Elland, und Elland hat eine Einwohnerzahl von 15.000, ist also eine etwas größere Stadt. Und sie brachte im Jahr 1997 einen Nobelpreis in Chemie hervor. Wenn Sie von Copley stromaufwärts gehen, dann kommen Sie zu einer anderen Stadt, Todmorden, die ebenfalls eine Einwohnerzahl von ungefähr 15.000 hat. Und sie brachte zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Also ist es das Wasser? Offensichtlich nicht. (Gelächter). Die Antwort lautet: die Lehrer. Die Lehrer inspirieren Sie und ermuntern Sie zu denken. Und tatsächlich können wir uns die Lehrer betrachten, die mit all diesen Personen zu tun hatten. Und Smithies hatte einen guten Lehrer in der Grundschule und zwei Lehrer im Gymnasium. Und Walker hatte einen guten Lehrer für Wissenschaften. Und Cockcroft und Wilkinson hatten beide denselben Lehrer für Wissenschaften, dieser Lehrer für Wissenschaften unterrichtete also mehr als 20 Jahre lang und brachte sozusagen zwei Nobelpreisträger hervor. Wenn Sie also Lehrer sind, dann denken Sie daran, wieviel Einfluss Sie in der Zukunft haben können. Vielleicht werden Sie das Vergnügen haben, ein Lehrer zu sein und nicht vergessen zu werden. Vielleicht bringen Sie einen Nobelpreisträger hervor, wer weiß? Seien Sie also ein sorgfältiger Lehrer, wenn Sie Lehrer sind. Ich hatte einen großartigen Lehrer, als ich zur Universität ging. Ich ging in das Balliol College der Universität von Oxford. Und dies ist mein Lehrer, “Sandy” Ogston. Er war in Chemie ausgebildet und machte einen zweiten Hochschulabschluss in Physik und fing an, Studenten im medizinischen Fachbereich zu unterrichten und ich habe das Stipendium für die Hochschule mit Physik erhalten, aber aus einem Grund, der mir im Moment nicht einfällt, habe ich mich für die Medizin entschieden. Jedenfalls war Sandy Ogston mein Lehrer. Und er brachte einen Nobelpreis im Jahr 1976 und einen weiteren im Jahr 2007 hervor, manche Lehrer können Sie also wirklich inspirieren. Die Art und Weise, in der damals in Oxford unterrichtet wurde, und dies wird hauptsächlich noch so gemacht, ist wunderbar. Ich wünsche mir, wir könnten es überall auf der Welt so machen. Aber es ist eine teure Art des Unterrichts. Und es war einmal in der Woche, dass Sie Ihren Lehrer treffen konnten, in diesem Fall Sandy Ogston, und ihm oder ihr einen Essay vorlegen, den Sie in der vergangenen Woche über ein Ihnen zugeteiltes Thema geschrieben haben. Und es wurde von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas erstellen, was zu der ursprünglichen Literatur zurückgeht. Sie können nicht mit einem Lehrbuch arbeiten, oder Sie lesen vielleicht ein Lehrbuch oder eine Besprechung - aber es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie etwas Neues schreiben. Sie erhalten vielleicht ein Thema “Schreiben Sie einen Aufsatz über Brot.” Und das ist alles, was man Ihnen sagt, und es wird von Ihnen erwartet, dass Sie einen tiefgründigen Artikel innerhalb einer Woche erstellen. (lacht) Sandy hat mir folgendes Thema zugeteilt: "Oliver, schreib mir einen Essay über Energie-Metabolismus”. Dies war jetzt vor der Veröffentlichung des Zyklus über Trikarbonsäurezyklus, vor dem Zyklus von Krebs. Und ich machte mich an die Arbeit. Und dann kam mir dies in die Quere. Und warum sollte ich Ihnen ein Buch zeigen? Ich zeige Ihnen dieses Buch, denn was in diesem Buch stand war so aufregend, dass ich mich daran erinnere, wo ich war, als ich es las. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Buch aussah. Ich erinnere mich daran, wie das Papier aussah. Es war so inspirierend, etwas zu lesen, was Sinn machte aus etwas, was Unsinn zu sein schien. Und der Unsinn war: Warum verbrennt der Körper nicht einfach Glukose und macht Kohlendioxid? Es ging durch all diese komplizierten Dinge durch das Hinzufügen von Phosphat und indem man dies und jenes tut. Und warum funktioniert es? Und dieses Buch enthält die Antwort. Die Antwort ist dieser kleine Schnörkel hier, P-Schnörkel, der energiereiches Phosphat bedeutet, eine energiereiche Phosphatverbindung. Und für die Chemiker ist es interessant, dass die energiereichen Verbindungen alle saure Anhydride sind. Und saure Anhydride sind sehr mächtige organische Stoffe, die sehr viel mehr Energie in sich bergen als es zum Beispiel die Phosphat-Ester haben würden. Und ganz vorbildlich erschien ich in der folgenden Woche mit einem Essay. Und darin stand der Zyklus von Smithies. Es war ein ziemlich smarter Zyklus, weil er mit einem anorganischen Phosphat begann und einen Phosphat-Ester bildete, welches eine relativ geringe Energie hatte. Und man nimmt ein Paar Wasserstoffe weg, und Sie können hier den Phosphat-Ester in ein saures Anhydrid umwandeln, und dies ist energiereich, daraus können Sie ATP machen. Und dann gehen Sie hier herum und fügen das Hydrogen hinten hinzu, und Sie können wieder von vorne anfangen und Sie könnten Energie aus nichts herstellen. Nun war ich nicht völlig dumm. Ich wusste, es war falsch, aber ich wusste nicht, warum es falsch war. Und dies war ein interessantes Problem. Und Sandy Ogston schrieb einen Artikel darüber, weil Menschen bei den Berechnungen vergessen haben, dass man an die Konzentration denken muss und nicht nur an was damals die standardmäßige freie Energie genannt wurde, bei der jede Komponente der Reaktion auf einer molaren Konzentration beruhte. Und er arbeitete heraus, dass es ein System geben musste, dass Energie schuf, indem sich Elektronen aufwärts in der elektromotorischen Skala bewegten, sozusagen in der Zelle. Und er sah die Wichtigkeit der Energie durch Konzentration voraus. Und er wurde sich klar darüber, dass das System nicht mit Substraten arbeiten könnte, die von ihren Enzymen getrennt sind. Und sie mussten übergeben werden ohne sich in freie Substrate zu zerlegen. Andernfalls hätten die Kinetiker sich geirrt, es war also ein guter Artikel. Und er veröffentlichte ihn und er war nett genug, meinen Namen als Schüler des Balliol College hinzuzufügen, und ich fühlte mich sehr gut dabei. Dies geschah im Jahr 1948, ist also schon eine ganze Weile her. Aber dann etwa um, sagen wir mal... das genaue Datum weiß ich nicht... aber sagen wir mal im Jahr 1990 etwa kam jemand auf mich zu und sagte, Und ich erwiderte ziemlich bescheiden: “Das stimmt schon, das bin ich”. Und er sagte; „Oh, ich dachte, Sie wären tot.“ (lacht) Und jedenfalls geht das Spiel weiter und hier ist meine Doktorarbeit und Sie können hier eine Menge bedeutender Zahlen sehen. Tatsächlich waren es sehr bedeutende Zahlen. Sie sind es nicht bedingt dadurch, dass sie in einem Computer abgerundet wurden, was eine gängige Methode ist, um viele signifikanten Werte zu erhalten. Aber Sie können sehen, dass meine experimentellen Punkte ziemlich gedrängt aneinander liegen und ich maß osmotischen Druck. Es ist nicht sehr wichtig zu wissen, was das ist, aber die Punkte waren so gedrängt, dass ich die Linie unterbrechen musste, um die theoretische Linie darauf zu setzen, und ich war auf diese sehr präzise Methode sehr stolz. Ich veröffentlichte es als “Ein dynamisches Osmometer für genaue Messungen”, ein ordentliches Papier. Es verzeichnete einen Rekord. Niemand hat es jemals zitiert. Niemand hat diese Methode wieder verwendet und auch ich habe diese Methode nie wieder verwendet. Sie müssen sich also fragen “Nun, worum geht es hier?” Und ich möchte, dass Sie einen Augenblick nachdenken. Nun, es geht hier darum, dass ich lernte, gute Wissenschaft zu betreiben und ich genoss es. Und dies sind die kritischen Dinge in den frühen Stadien Ihrer Karriere, dass Sie lernen, gute Arbeit zu leisten und das gerne zu tun. Es ist nicht wichtig, was Sie tun. Das ist absolut unwichtig. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres wissenschaftlichen Mentors sein. Sie wollen nicht ein Klon Ihres Doktorvaters sein. Sie möchten Sie selbst sein, aber Sie können von diesen Leuten lernen, wie Sie gute Wissenschaft betreiben aber Sie müssen es genießen. Andernfalls werden Sie nicht die Leidenschaft haben, die Sie brauchen. Ich bitte Sie also dringend, wenn Sie nicht das tun, was Sie möchten, dann gehen Sie zu Ihrem Berater und sagen „Ich brauche ein anderes Thema, ich genieße es nicht.“ Wenn der Berater es nicht tun kann, dann wechseln Sie den Berater. Ich meine es ernst. Es ist so wichtig, weil es unwahrscheinlich ist und ich hoffe, dass Sie die Arbeit derselben Art tun werden, die Sie gemacht haben als Sie ein graduierter Student waren oder nach der Doktorarbeit. Sie benutzen vielleicht die Fertigkeit aber Sie hoffen, etwas anderes zu tun. Und ich habe dies in meiner Diplomarbeit oder nach der Doktorarbeit nicht geschafft. Meine Zeit nach der Doktorarbeit war nichts Ungewöhnliches, aber ich ging nach Toronto, um einen Job anzunehmen. Und dort erhielt ich einen Job durch David Scott und er hat frühzeitig auf dem Gebiet des Insulins gearbeitet, weil das Insulin in Toronto entdeckt wurde, und er war der Erste, der es herauskristallisierte und dauerhaftes Insulin herstellte. Und er sagte” “Sie können über alles forschen, solange es etwas mit Insulin zu tun hat." Und ich dachte Es hat wohl einen Vorläufer geben.” Wir wissen nun, dass es einen Vorläufer gibt. Aber falls Sie es erwarten: ich habe es nicht entdeckt - aber ich versuchte es. Und dabei musste ich einen Weg finden, auf Insulin zu schauen, ich dachte, ich würde etwas Neues mittels Elektrophorese finden. Und damals wurden viele Elektrophoresen auf Filterpapier durchgeführt, wo Sie ein Filterpapier mit Pufferlösung einweichen, das Protein dazugeben und ihm erlauben zu wandern und Sie sehen es verschmiert. Dies war wirklich kein gutes Ergebnis und ich war ziemlich frustriert. Und dann hörte ich von der Arbeit dieser beiden Herren: Kunkel und Slater und Sie hatten einen Kasten verwendet, einen Kasten dieser Größe, dieser Größe und so weiter. Und sie füllten ihn mit Stärke, etwa so wie einen Sandkasten, nur war es Stärke, und sie hatten Puffer darin und sie gaben die Prüfsubstanz in die Stärke. Und der Vorteil war, dass anders als beim Filterpapier ... Dies ist von ihrem Papier … Hier ist ein auf das Filterpapier aufgebrachte Protein und es verschmierte, genau wie mein Insulin verschmierte. Aber wenn Sie es wieder auf die Stärke geben taucht es wie ein deutlicher Zacken wieder auf. Aber um das Protein zu finden müssen Sie es in 40 Scheiben schneiden und auf jeder Scheibe eine Proteinermittlung durchführen und Sie müssen für einen Elektrophorese-Durchgang 40 Proteinermittlungen durchführen. Ich hatte in meinem Labor keine Spülmaschine, ich hatte keinen Techniker. Ich konnte dies nicht machen. Aber ich erinnere mich, meiner Mutter beim Wäschemachen geholfen zu haben; ich war zumindest anwesend... Sie nahm Pulver aus Stärke und kochte es mit heißem Wasser auf und machte eine schleimige Mischung, die für die Hemdenkragen meines Vaters angewendet wurde, die steif sein mussten, und so wurden sie gebügelt. Und nach einer gewissen Zeit wurde aus der Stärke ein Gallert. Und ich dachte “Ach du meine Güte, wenn ich ein Stärkegel aus der Stärke mache, es aufkoche, und es dann färben kann, dann werde ich dieses Problem der 40 Scheiben los.” Und am Samstagvormittag war ich damit durch. Und am Nachmittag begann ich mein erstes Experiment damit. Da gibt es einen Schnitt, und da ist das Insulin als ein nettes Band und ich machte den Vermerk Und dies war der Anfang der Elektrophorese mit Gel. Und als ich etwas später nur für einen groben Test fortfuhr hatte ich Plasma oder Serum darauf getan, und ich konnte die Bänder der Proteine sehen, die im Blut enthalten sind. Die Leute dachten, dass es fünf Proteine gibt: Albumin, Alpha-1, Alpha-2, Beta und Gamma Globulin. Wir wissen heute, dass es etwa 700 von ihnen gibt. Aber die Leute wussten damals von fünf und ich bekam diese Bänder und ich startete das Experiment wieder um Mitternacht... Und ich konnte immer arbeiten. Und, Entschuldigung, und dann ein wenig später organisierte ich es so, dass ich ein Muster in den Bändern erkannte, und ich hatte viele zu beschriftende Bänder. Ich konnte tatsächlich 11 Bänder finden und wenn Sie einen guten Chef haben, können Sie dann eine Schritt nach vorne gehen, denn ich ging zu Scottie, wir nannten uns damals gegenseitig Scottie und Oliver, ich ging zu Scottie und sagte zu ihm: “Scottie, ich habe wirklich etwas sehr Interessantes gefunden. Ich möchte gerne mit der Arbeit am Insulin aufhören und an diesem Problem arbeiten.” Und er sagte, er war ein guter Wissenschaftler “Mach auf alle Fälle den Wechsel” und ich hoffe, dass Sie diese Möglichkeit auch haben. Sehen Sie, als mir das widerfuhr, war meine Doktorarbeit lange her … Es gibt den einen Augenblick und Sie erkennen, dass Sie etwas gefunden haben, das Sie dazu führen sollte etwas ganz Neues zu tun. Und ich war soweit, meine Arbeit zu veröffentlichen und dies waren zwei meiner Freunde. Ich hatte genug davon, selbst zu bluten, und so bekam ich Blut von meinen Freunden. Und ich denke, dafür sind sie da, oder nicht? Und dies sind George Connell und Gordon Dixon, und warum gibt es keine Fotos? Mein Labor hatte keine Kamera. Es war damals ein so karges Labor. Aber ich war bereit zu veröffentlichen und Fotos machen zu lassen. Und dann führte ich zufälligerweise ein Experiment mit Beth Wades Blutprobe durch und seltsamerweise gab es viele zusätzliche Bänder. Und was war an Beth Wades Blut anders? Es handelte sich um eine Frau. Es war das erste Mal, dass ich eine Probe einer Frau untersuchte. Ich dachte, ich habe eine neue Methode gefunden, um Männer von Frauen zu unterscheiden. Und ich nannte ein Muster das M-Muster und das andere das W-Muster: M für männlich, W für weiblich. Und ich konnte etwa eine Woche lang etwa zwei Proben täglich untersuchen, männlich und weiblich passten immer gut zusammen. Und dann beim sechsten Mal war alles ganz anders. Und der Mann änderte sich in eine Frau. Wir machten es ihm nicht leicht. Komm schon, Casey, schau dir das an. Aber Sie sagen vielleicht, so ist die Jugend. Aber hier ist mein Datenblatt. Ganz bemerkenswert, aber es zeigte sich, dass der Unterschied zwischen den Typen mit dem Geschlecht nichts zu tun hat. Es hatte mit den existierenden Blutgruppen nichts zu tun und es war offenbar etwas Neues. Und ich zeige dies aus einem anderen Grund. Es ist ein Datenblatt, das jetzt fast 60 Jahre alt ist. Sie können Ihr Datenblatt nicht 60 Jahre verfügbar halten, wenn sie keinen Ausdruck machen. Sie müssen Ausdrucke machen von den wichtigen Daten, die Sie haben. Verlassen Sie sich nicht auf Ihren Computer, weil Sie einen Floppy jetzt nicht lesen können, und es gab einen Moment, da hatten wir genau das. Sie werden ganz bestimmt eine CD-ROM in 10 Jahren nicht lesen können. Machen Sie einige Ausdrucke und bewahren Sie gute Ausdrucke auf. Diese Unterschiede, die es hier gab, stellten sich als genetisch bedingt heraus. Und, nur um die Geschichte zu beenden, es war ein ziemlich komplizierter genetischer Unterschied und wir arbeiten daran mit Hilfe von Norma Ford-Walker, die eine hervorragende Genetikerin war und mir Genetik unterrichtet hatte. Und dann, weil die Dinge sich weiterentwickelten, vorher konnten wir keine Protein-Sequenzierung durchführen, jetzt konnten wir Proteine sequenzieren, Gene isolieren, Gene sequenzieren, und es wurde klar, dass es da etwas gab, was man damit tun könnte. Linus Pauling und Harvey Itano und Vernon zum Beispiel zeigten, dass die Sichelzellmutation aus einer Umwandlung der Glutaminsäure in ein Valin im Globinmolekül herrührte. Und ich begann zu glauben, dass es möglich sein sollte, das Gen durch Gentargeting zu korrigieren. Wir sind nun in dem Stadium, in dem wir eine geklonte DNA, eine normale DNA hatten. Und ich dachte, wenn ich einen Teil einer normalen DNA einführe, könnte ich eine Art Genaustausch bekommen, das SA und GE aneinanderzureihen und das schlechte Gen in ein gutes Gen durch Genaustausch umzuwandeln. Ich wusste, dass es in der Hefe möglich ist und Jack war heute hier … Ich weiß nicht, ob er heute unter den Zuhörern ist, Aber Jack and Terry Orr-Weaver zeigten, dass Sie in der Hefe ein Gen modifizieren konnten, und ich habe gelehrt und dass dann so auch unterrichten. Aber das Hefe-Genom ist ungefähr zwei Größenordnungen kleiner als das menschliche Genom. Und es war daher nicht klar, ob es in einem Menschen durchgeführt werden konnte. Und dann wieder, wenn man über “Woher kommen Ideen” spricht... Sie müssen verstehen, wenn Sie unterrichten. Und um zu verstehen, müssen Sie manchmal viel Zeit damit verbringen, ein Papier zu lesen, bevor sie es gut genug verstehen, um es zu unterrichten. Und dies war ein Papier, dass am 1. April 1982 veröffentlicht wurde, und sie sprachen über eine Methode, ein Gen zu befreien, und, ich kann aus Zeitgründen nicht ins Detail gehen, abgesehen davon, dass es das Auffinden eines Teiles blauer DNA beinhaltete, die sozusagen der roten DNA am nächsten ist. Die rote DNA war das, was sie isolieren wollten, und es war die blaue DNA, die sie gewöhnlich fanden. Und ich dachte, dass ich diese Methode für Tests des Genaustausches verwenden kann. Daher gibt es nur drei Wochen, nachdem dieses Papier veröffentlicht wurde, eine Probe für die Gen-Platzierung. Und meine Idee war, daraus die blaue DNA zu verwenden, die in Bakterien zu finden war, und zu versuchen, auf das Beta Globin-Gen abzuzielen und dieses Fragment zu suchen. Ich sollte sagen: dies ist hereinkommende DNA, dies ist das Zielobjekt. Wenn ich ein DNA finden könnte, wo diese beide kombiniert sind, würde ich bewiesen haben, dass die Modifizierung erfolgt ist, da dies nicht auf der hereinkommenden DNA geschehen ist und nicht auf dem Ziel. Und mit einer Menge Arbeit gehen wir tiefer und kommen zur Stufe, auf der wir es vereinfachen, und wir haben eine eher einfaches Plasmid verwendet, das sehr ähnlich aussieht wie das von Terry Orr-Weaver benutzte, und Sie können sehen, dass, wenn Sie das Gen treffen, dies ist eine Abbildung der Enzymbegrenzung, dass Sie ein DNA-Fragment isolieren können, das 11 Kilobasen sein würde, wenn Sie nicht auf das Gen treffen würden. Wenn Sie auf das Gen treffen dann würde die Größe acht Kilobasen sein. Und eine lange Reihe von Experimenten führt zu dem Tag schließlich, als ich an einem Samstag einen Film mit Tests verschiedener Kolonien entwickelte, und es gab einen, wo das Fragment jetzt eine Länge von sieben, acht Kilobasen hat statt mehr, so wurde bewiesen, dass Gentargeting möglich war. Und sobald Sie bewiesen haben, dass dies möglich ist, können Sie es verwenden und andere Leute werden beginnen, es zu verwenden. Aber die Frequenz war hoffnungslos niedrig und für den ursprünglichen Zweck nicht praktisch, der darin bestand, einer Person mit Sichelzellanämie zu helfen. Also was tun? Mit jemand anderem sprechen und ich las über das Werk von Martin Evans, der eine Embryo-Stammzelle verwendet hat. Hier ist eine Blastocyste. Dies ist der Teil der Blastocyste, aus dem der Embryo entsteht. Und Martin Evans und seine Studenten zeigten wie diese zu kultivieren sind, um auf diese Weise diese Zellen einer cremefarbigen Maus zu kultivieren. Und wenn er diese cremefarbigen Stammzelle in eine Blastocyste einfügen, würden sie sich daran erinnern, woher sie kommen, und Sie können aus dieser Blastocyste eine Maus erschaffen, indem sie sie in eine weibliche Maus einsetzen, und Sie würden chimärische Mäuse erhalten, Mischungen. Und von ihnen können Sie das Gen züchten, an dem Sie interessiert sind. Und dies war etwas Offensichtliches. Lasst uns eine Methode verwenden, um Gene zu verändern. Aber die Probe war furchtbar. Und so brauchten wir Hilfe von einem Chemiker und wir bekamen Hilfe von Kary Mullis, der den Nobelpreis für die Erfindung der Polymerase-Kettenreaktion erhielt. Und hier ist eine kleine Stelle in einem meiner Notizbücher, die besagt, dass Sie diese Methode verwenden können, um die rekombinante Passage zu lokalisieren. Und ich baute den Apparat, um dies zu tun. Dies ist mein Apparat. Warum würden Sie einen Apparat bauen? Nun, der Grund war, dass keiner zur Verfügung stand. Sie können keinen Apparat kaufen, um die Polymerase-Kettenreaktion zu machen. Aber ich glaube dass man dieses Schild anbringen sollte. Meine Kollegen taten es bei dem Apparat, der auf dem Boden lag. Und da steht NBGBOKFO “no bloody good, but okay for Oliver”, weil ich immer Material aus Abfall machen würde, wie Sie sehen, und das alles sind Gegenstände aus dem Abfall. Nichts davon ist neu und dies ist noch der Apparat, den wir benutzten für den Nobelpreis. Die Methode war gut und hier ist ein Superartikel darüber und Sie merken, dass ich nicht der Autor bin. Es freut mich zu sagen, dass die Autorin hier unten steht. Sie ist meine Frau und sie kam und schuf ein aufsehenerregendes Tier, das Atherosklerose bekommen kann. Nun, wohin nun? Ich zeige Ihnen auch diese Sache, weil es noch ein bisschen mehr gibt, worüber man reden kann. Hier ist Sandy Ogston wieder, aber hier gibt es jetzt einen kleinen Unterschied, weil hier auch sein Todesdatum steht. Weil er sagte “Wenn ich sterbe, Oliver, möchte ich gerne, dass Du meine wissenschaftlichen Memoiren schreibst”. Und dies war etwas, was die Royal Society gerne haben wollte. Und dann müssen Sie all diese Papers lesen. Und ich las alles von ihm aus seinen Papers. Und dann hatte er diese schöne kleine Formel hier, die über den verfügbaren Raum in einem Gel in Molekülen von einem Radius R spricht, wenn das Gel aus Fasern des Radius r besteht, und es gibt n Fasern pro Quadratzentimeter. Und er sprach über einen Querschnitt des Gels. Und diese Gleichung ist berückend genau. Sie funktioniert für jedes Gel, von dem Sie je gehört haben und wurde ausgiebig getestet. Diese zwei Herren in meinem Labor machten ein Diagramm, um sie zu veranschaulichen, und ich mochte es. Wenn Sie eine kleine gelöste Substanz haben, kann sie eine Menge Raum in einem Gel vorfinden. Aber wenn Sie eine große gelöste Substanz haben kann es nur einen begrenzten Raum vorfinden. Und ich dachte, dass dies auf die Niere angewendet werden könnte und ich schrieb ein Paper darüber, dass die Idee darin bestünde, dass hier kleine Moleküle leicht durch die Niere gehen würden. Und große Moleküle würden eine ziemlich niedrige Konzentration haben, wenn sie durch ein Gel gehen müssen und ich veröffentlichte ein Diagramm, das das Prinzip veranschaulichte. Dies ist ein Querschnitt einer Niere in EM-Auflösung. Und dies sind die Größen der Albumin-Moleküle, im Maßstab, und dies ist das Gel in der Niere, durch die, wie ich dachte, der Vorgang erfolgen würde. Und ich ging zu unserem Spezialisten für kolloidales Gold, das ich verwenden wollte, um sie in dem Elektronmikroskop zu sehen. Und er sagte, ich werde sie nicht für dich machen, Oliver. Sie machen ihre eigenen. Er sagte “Du wirst mehr lernen, wenn Du sie machst.” Ich war total begeistert. Es gibt wunderbare interessante Dinge und ich verbrachte einen großen Teil meiner Zeit mit ihnen. Ich werde Ihnen hier nur ein Beispiel zeigen. Dies war vor vier Jahren. Und dies war die Zeit, als ich zu lernen begann … Arbeitete immer noch am Wochenende. Das war der Zeit als ich herausfand, dass ich die Größe eines Moleküls kontrollieren konnte, indem ich die Zeitdauer der Reaktion im Verfahren variierte. Ich machte daraus in Langmuir ein Paper und ich bin der erste Autor. Und ich bin der erste Autor, weil ich die Arbeit gemacht habe, nicht weil ich das Paper geschrieben habe, sondern weil die Experimente meine waren, die meisten von ihnen. Denken Sie also darüber nach. Es ist wirklich nett, in einem Paper mit 89 Jahren der Hauptverfasser zu sein, und besonders wenn es das erste Paper ist, dass ich je in einer Chemie-Zeitschrift veröffentlicht habe. Aber ich habe noch etwas … Oh, hier ist ein Beispiel, an dem man arbeiten sollte. Hier ist ein Plasma mit großen Molekülen in Clustern und sie können nicht in die Basalmembran eindringen. Es ist komplizierter als das, aber dies ist ein Beispiel. Ich habe eine letzte kleine Sache, die ich Ihnen zeigen will, und hier ist es. Und warum zeige ich ein Flugzeug dafür? Es ist zum Teil, weil es ein Teil meines Lebens ist, aber dies ist mein Lehrer, Field Morey. Und er brachte mir das Fliegen bei, und ich war ein nervöser Flieger. Als ich lernte mit ihm zu fliegen, hier sitzt der Lehrer und der Schüler sitzt auf dem linkem Sitz. Schweiß strömte mir aus allen Poren, ich meine es wörtlich. Und so wandte ich mich eines Tages an ihn und sagte: „Dies war ein guter Tag für Sie. Nur ein Tropfen ist abgefallen.“ Und das führte mich zu einem Gedanken. Ich habe später gelernt, Lehrer zu sein, und ich hatte einen Schüler, Jeff Bloch. Und als wir zusammen flogen, ich brachte ihm das Gleiten bei, kam er komplett durchnässt zurück. Er klebte richtig an der Rückenlehne. Er flog dann irgendwann selbst und sagte später zu mir “Schau, Oliver, trocken.” Dies ist eine sehr interessante Lektion, nicht nur für das Fliegen. Sie zeigt Ihnen, dass Sie mit Wissen Angst bewältigen können. Wenn Sie nervös dabei sind, wenn Sie etwas Neues in der Wissenschaft machen, dann könnten Sie sagen “Dieser Kerl hier, er ist viel schlauer als ich. Oder diese Dame, sie weiß, was zu tun ist. Ich könnte das möglicherweise nicht tun”. Sie sind ängstlich. Gehen Sie, lernen Sie. Gehen Sie, lesen Sie. Sie können alles. Sie können Felder ändern. Sie müssen nicht irgendwo festgefahren sein. Gehen Sie und überwinden Sie Angst durch Wissen. Dies ist mein Motorgleiter und hier ist mein Freund. Und wenn Sie Glück haben werden Sie einen Freund haben wie ich ihn in Nobuyo habe und an dieser Stelle höre ich auf. Applaus

Oliver Smithies stressing the importance of teaching as a way of ensuring that you really understand a topic
(00:23:42 - 00:23:53)

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching and education were also dear to the heart of the late Sir Harold Kroto, who was a great champion of science and who believed passionately in the role of science in making the world a better place. In these excerpts from his lecture in 2012, he discusses the importance of science education and his own efforts in this direction and encourages the members of the audience to get involved.

 

Sir Harold Kroto (2012) - Science - Lost in Translation?

Ok, it's a pleasure to be back at Lindau yet again and talk to you. It's a great place and I enjoy coming. It's going to be science lost in translation. But first is: How did I get here? In fact, I was once as young and many of us were as young as some of you are, originally. And I thought I'd show you what happened at school because that's the start of it. Really I didn't want to be a scientist. What I really wanted to be was Superman. And as all scientists know you need evidence and here is the evidence for this. Flying was difficult so I did other things like play tennis and gymnastics. And I acted in a play, Henry V, at school and I thought I'd show you these 2 guys. I'm the handsome guy on the right here just in case you didn't know. And I tell young people like you: You know, don't become an actor because the guy in front, actually be a scientist, not an actor because he is now 5,000 years old and I'm a lot younger than he is. Alright, Ian and I were in the same year at school. Fantastic actor and he came out to stay with us at Tallahassee a couple of year ago. So those are the sorts of things and also perhaps more important than science for me is art and graphics. And I did a lot of drawing and at university did posters and things of this nature, designed the cover of the university magazine. I think it's very important to actually open up those facets of your creative ability. And in fact my first award was not for science, it was for this design and it got into a national newspaper and I used to look like this. Now, I'm old and decrepit now and you're going to look, you're beautiful and young now and you'll look like me one day so I get my own back. So, painting and doing these... I'm not quite sure what that is so I'll gloss over that. Basically those are the sorts of things and this is Margaret, my wife, who is in the audience. And I now do logos and this is my favourite for the Australians here. Yeah, hopefully you'll be better at soccer than the English, rather than cricket, as we know. And I always like ideas. And in fact I designed this Darwin T-shirt and Prishant where are you, are you anywhere around, there you go, there's my T-shirt actually. It's a secret society, you see, it's Darwin's phylogenetic tree. Ok, it's my former co-worker. This is my latest bumper sticker, which I think very importantly. And, oh, I redesigned the Japanese flag, so hopefully that's good. The other thing, in the '60s you had to play a guitar or you wouldn't get to parties, so I had to do that as well. But I think more than anything else what made me a chemist was photography. And I thought I'd show you what it was like to take a photograph. I think Doug Osheroff knows something about that of course because he has the biggest camera on the campus. So you really had to have an incentive to do that. And I did have one and she's in the audience over there. But today all you need to do is that, ok. And you've lost so much. And it epitomises technology that is so inscrutable and that today it's so hard to know what's going on. I also had Meccano and in fact I thought I'd show you an advert from those days. It was basically this one: Meccano boys, and of course today you've got to add the girls in there, are keen, ambitious, inventive. No boy or girl who follows the Meccano hobby can be a bad boy or bad girl. But here it is, we used our hands and made things. And this epitomises what science is. It's not about running around and enjoying things; it's being totally absorbed in things. And I used to make things with nuts and bolts and now it's with electrons and atoms. So basically there's not a lot of difference. And with my youngest son who is a cartoonist we just produced a book in Japan for children. The other thing that was important for me was architecture. I was fascinated by this. In some ways I think I might have ended up one. And I drew this drawing of the town hall in Stockholm where the Nobel Prize is awarded long before I knew what the Nobel Prize was because I was fascinated by the building and by Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright's image. There is some interesting architecture at Sussex where I was for 37 years and I played around with these things. But the architecture that was most important really was this, Buckminster Fuller's dome which was at expo which we visited. And it was rather crucial in deciding what the structure of C60 was. So there it is. You'd never know when your other ideas might be important. And I think that's an issue I think today. Ok, so now let's go to basically science lost in translation. And I'm dedicating this to Giordano Bruno. How many of you know about Giordano Bruno? If you don't, find out because he's... I'm not a big man for saints but if there is a saint this is the saint of science. Basically I'm not here to make you feel comfortable. I'm here to make you think. And in fact the issue, when I give this lecture I usually quote this one from Don Marquis: "If you make people think, they're thinking they love you. But if you really make them think they hate you." Now, it may be the case that you will hate me at the end of this lecture. But at least I'll have made you think. So there you go. I want to start with one of my all time favourite people. It's the Australian scientist John Cornforth who has been deaf since the age of 18. And he wrote a fantastic article which you must all read, its "Scientists are Citizens". It's on my Vega website. Scientists do not believe, they check. I'm not asking you to believe anything I say on the scientific matter and I would say on any matter. Only that there is tested evidence for all of it. I know the nature of that evidence and I can make a judgement of its worth." It's a powerful statement. In the interesting book by Richard Feynman in "The Meaning of it All", I love this book very much, he says: And I do not want to forget the importance of that struggle and by default let it fall away. If you know that you are unsure you have a chance to change the situation." And I love this line: That's for you. Well, what do I think? There are 3 senses. Common sense, common sense is interesting because it tells us that the sun goes around the earth. Who agrees with me? I should bloody well hope so. It starts over here and ends over there. Common sense tells us the sun goes around the earth. How many agree with me now, yes. It's uncommon sense which tells us that the earth is turning on its axis and makes it seem like that. It's the uncommon sense and bravery of Copernicus, Galileo and Giordano Bruno. And if you want watch on the internet and you can see Giordano Bruno's film by Carlo Ponte. You will never forget it because these people fought for you to have the freedom to doubt. Now, most people have accepted the claim that the earth goes around the sun. How many accept that? Almost all of you. Ok, who knows the evidence? Not too many, more than usual because there are a few physicists around. Not many of them know the evidence either. But what else, and this is the important thing, what else have you accepted without knowing the evidence? Ok, many people, in fact probably the majority, maybe 90, 95% of people accept claims for which there is no evidence whatsoever. Think about it. The Royal Society has a crest, "Nullius in verba", which means: Take nobody's word for it, don't take my word for it or my colleagues, just because they're Nobel Prize winners. Listen to what they say but assess it; think of it as a scientist. The problem is that nonsense is common now. And I'm going to give you one beautiful example of creativity at the Kentucky Fried Creation Museum in Cincinnati. Did humans live with dinosaurs? Well, if they did, we obviously put saddles on them and must have ridden them, ok. What did they originally eat? You don't need those teeth to eat a lettuce. What happened to the dinosaurs that didn't go in Noah's Ark? I have met teachers in Florida, science teachers, who claim this. Think about it. There's Noah's Ark and Noah is there and he's Scottish. Any Scots around? You didn't know that, he's got a Scottish accent. There's a big flood coming and we've got to build a big boat. So that's the problem. In my lifetime we've discovered something beautiful and fantastic. And look at the humanity in the face of it. It's obviously an Italian football supporter last week. Mind you it was an English football supporter the week before. But there you go. And this I love; 70% of our genes the same as a pumpkin. And you only have to look at the average politician to actually see the evidence for that. There's more evidence for evolution than any other truth we have discovered. And the attack on evolution is not just an attack on Darwin. It's an attack on the whole of the sciences because the evidence comes from all of these places. And we've got to fight it and shove it down the throats of some very stupid people, including some people who want to be president of the United States. No one has described science better than the great American writer Walt Whitman. That's the great writer, the great line, the double take. The willingness to surrender ideas when the evidence is against him. This is ultimately fine. It keeps the way beyond open. Whitman has drawn an important... Attention, something very important here. All the constructs, all of them, are locked forever, maybe 1,000's of years, in unshakable dogmatic opinion, intrinsically impervious to rational criticism. You haven't got any way of attacking it. Even some sciences who should know better do not appreciate this. That is obvious in what they write. The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth persistent, persuasive and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." You may be surprised who said it. It was Kennedy; it's a great line. Look around. Well what about Feynman again, the greatest communicator that I've ever seen. If you're interested in the ultimate character of the physical world, the complete world, and at the present time our only way to understand that is through a mathematical type of reasoning, then I don't think a person can fully appreciate or in fact can appreciate much of these particular aspects of the world, the great depth and character of the universality of the laws, the relationships of things, without an understanding of mathematics. I think it's just... I don't know any other way to do it. We don't know any other way to describe it accurately and well or to see the interrelationships without it. So I don't think a person who hasn't developed some mathematical sense is capable of fully appreciating this aspect of the world. Don't misunderstand me, there are many, many aspects of the world that mathematics is unnecessary for such as love. And which are very delightful and wonderful to appreciate and to feel awed and mysterious about. And I don't mean to say that the only thing in the world is physics but you were talking about physics and if that's what you're talking about then to not know mathematics is a severe limitation in understanding the world. That's from a fantastic film made by a friend of mine, Chris Sykes. If you get a chance to see it, watch it, amazing piece of sort of science but television. Well, let's go and think about mathematics. It certainly goes back to the Indians. But also Al-Karismi in about the 8th century, 7th or 8th century, wrote this book. And he formulated the rules of algebra but they were in words, ok. It was all in prose, no equations, ok. Diophantus in the second century certainly had equations and here are some... the way in which it was written and you can disentangle that. So it goes back a long time. But the first book in English was written by Robert Recorde. And it's very interesting because in this book, the first book, he invented the equal sign. And in fact in this book it tells you how to do subtraction. So, that was about 1550. So it goes certainly to do that. Now there are some people who actually appreciate mathematics and I thought... And here we have them. And in fact there's something missing there. That is wonderful because here we see young people who are prepared to see something beautiful in science and mathematics itself. I'll gloss over that. That was LSD just in case you want to synthesise it. But look at this, Nicole a physics graduate student, she says: I consider it the most beautiful thing I have ever learned." Look at, listen to that. And believe it or not. And I was actually able to get the full, well not the full because it goes on to infinity, it would have been tricky to, to photograph the whole of it. But anyway here is Nicole, wonderful student who was here at Lindau in 2010. Ok, so now let's think about science and how old is it? It's not actually very old. Abaelard in the 12th century said basically: And this is a very profound statement, really about science. Of course doubt and questioning are intrinsic dangers to those who believe in dogma and use that for their authority. And Abaelard is somebody who got into hot water and more. Francis Bacon in this book, which was interestingly titled "Novum Oganum", new instrument, actually laid down the foundations of scientific method basically. Determining what is intrinsically true, if that's important to you, it's not important to everybody, certainly not some people who shall be nameless. Observation, hypothesis, supporting evidence and physical law. If we invert Abaelard's statement, we arrive at the most profound axiom of all time: To determine truth we must doubt and enquire, we must not accept. This has explosive consequences. The new instrument intrinsically undermines the assumptions and claims that it had been held sway heretofore for 1,000 years, that fundamental truth was to be found in the Holy Scriptures. Those who followed this axiom found themselves in conflict with dogma based authority and many were executed, Giordano Bruno for one. And that's why I need to dedicate this to him. We owe it to him for the freedoms that we have today to question and doubt. And if you look around, the one place, the one place or those places where basically natural philosophy has really undermined dogma, there you have democracy and science. That's an interesting observation. But who was the first physicist? Well here's another quotation, I love them very much and this one particularly: Anyway I love this quotation very much that I decided to go to Google to find out who actually said it. And when I got there and put it in I actually discovered it was me. But if you change it slightly to "know the answers", then you discover it's Kung Fu. Great, alright there we go. So probably Confucianism and Taoism. So it is a question of what physics is. However, what we need to know is who wrote the first equation of physics. Well let's look at the simplest, Hooke's law, lectures on spring, Hooke's wrote, that is in words: That is if one power stretch it or bend it one space, 2 will bend it 2 and so forth. Now the theory is very short so the way of trying is very easy." So, basically it tells this and basically if you put something else on there, we put that on there and it goes down, ok. Hooke's law, no equations; who did that? That's an interesting point. Christiaan Huygens is supposed to have done it but I haven't actually found it. He knew something about momentum transfer but I still have to confirm that he wrote the first equations. Science started with this guy, ok. And I'm willing to argue it. This is fantastic equipment and just look at the exquisite beauty of this engraving. He used that to measure the orbits of the planets. But it was Kepler who got hold of those data and in this book... He actually had to develop his own logarithms to do the calculations. He showed that the orbit of Mars was an ellipse with the sun at one focus. That was the moment at which science began. And that is in the Rudolphine Tables. Newton came along and explained it. A key guy that I never heard of is Willem 's Gravesande, in this book he writes (reading in French): Mr Leibnitz was the first to suggest that the force (kinetic energy) of the moving body is not proportional to the velocity, according to ordinary view, but to the square; so if the velocity is doubled the force (kinetic energy) is quadrupled. Typical Englishman trying to speak French, but there you go. But it was Leibniz who showed that kinetic energy is 1/2 mV^2 and Willem 's Gravesande showed that by dropping balls into soft clay. That was a major point. And it was Émilie du Châtelet who corrected Newton on kinetic energy because he thought it was momentum. Calculus was required as you know and basically what you need to do is to be able to integrate that. And I don't think you can do that in words and what you get then is the beautiful parabolic curve of the harmonic oscillator. Those are required for the sciences. And in fact that's important. Now we move on to an important guy, Einstein. And Einstein as you know developed the theory of relativity. And this was attacked by quite a number of people including Cardinal O'Connell who said: A New York rabbi decided to write a telegram and said do you believe in god, Albert? That's an interesting statement. So who is this Spinoza guy? He lived in Amsterdam. He outlined in precise detail his philosophical views backing them with logical argument which he claimed were irrefutable. The synagogue authorities decided they had no alternative; they had to get rid of him, ok. A great horn was blown, candles were extinguished one by one. A curse was read out: And cursed be he by day. And cursed be he by night. And cursed when he's lying down and when he's rising up and going out and basically coming back in again." None may speak with him with word of mouth nor by writing now show any favour to him. Nor be under one roof, nor come within 4 cubits of him, nor read any document by him." Well you've got to read this guy, right? With that sort of recommendation. But unfortunately it's in Latin, ok. But this is Strathern's book: This suggests that Spinoza's religion of disenchantment could in fact be a pressing description of modern science. A pantheistic universe whose truth we can comprehend only by the use of reason, mathematics and rational experiment." That's what we're doing here. I don't have the Higgs boson under there, but maybe we will do one day. The orderly harmony of what exists. Let's take the numbers 1, 3 and 5 and look at chemistry because I'm a chemist. I know I'm an interloper amongst all you physicists but there you go. The earth orbits the sun; we use classical mechanics. For an electron orbiting a nucleus we use quantum mechanics. But according to quantum mechanics the orientations of a spinning object only have certain orientations, ok? Not all are allowed. And the quantum number j has the values 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. And the orientations are termed by a very simple formula 2j+1.Therefore when j=0, 2j+1=1. When j=1, 2j+1=3 and when j=2, 2j+1=5, ok? Hence 1, 3 and 5. Now then I'm going to double that, double that set and double that set, move this to there and that to there. Double that set, double that set, double that and move this to there and that to there. And what have we got? It explains the whole of chemistry, all of life and all the useful bits of physics if any. Ok, we chemists have to get back at the great champions of the sciences. Of course physics is the overall arching of the sciences. But chemistry is that massive part of physics that pertains to you, the everyday world, to biology and all these things. And it's based on the numbers 1, 3 and 5. That is science, something so elegant and beautiful. And the value to the human race is also important. I want to show you what it was like to have an amputation without an anaesthetic. No IPhones to measure these things; just have a good look at it. Ah yeah, that was what it was like. People died in shock. There can be no more humanitarian contribution to the human race than anaesthetics from chemistry ok. Penicillin, this simple molecule is really a miracle, you don't have to pray. This little girl in 1942 was cured in 3 weeks. She would have died a year earlier. And one of the heroes is this person who is almost unknown. The future bacteria are evolving with an immunity to antibiotics. Think about it, we need you brilliant young people to solve the problems of the future. And there's misplaced credit for these things. This is a very interesting story of a man in Tallahassee where we live 9 months a year. Alan Cross has spent 24 years in a Florida jail for a crime he did not commit, ok. He got out; he said: His faith kept him going. Incredible guy, but science got him out. And who was the person? Alec Jeffrey's from Leicester University developed DNA fingerprinting. Science is a humanitarian construct. And what is it? Well, we've talked a little bit about it and I'm going to come to my analysis of it. There are aspects of science. One is it's a body of knowledge, another one is the application of that knowledge; it's technology. Another one, very important, is that way that scientific knowledge is actually uncovered. But there's something much more important. And really because science is so useful, people have forgotten what that is. They don't understand what it is. Basically politicians have no idea; they think that you only do science because it's useful. Before science was useful it had another name and it was called natural philosophy. And by far the most important aspect is that natural philosophy is the only philosophical construct we have devised to determine truth with any degree of reliability. Now I'm going to define it, I'm going to say: We have a construct. That construct is the construct that determines truth with any degree of reliability and that I'm going to define as natural philosophy. And the ethical purpose of education must involve the teaching of young people how they can decide what they're being told is actually true. I'm sure we must agree on that. If we don't, we've got problems. Thus the teaching of a sceptical, evidence based assessment of all claims without exception is an intellectual integrity issue that all teachers must address. Without evidence anything goes. Think about it, look around and see that that's the fact. Let me go back to this fantastic article by "Kappa" (John W. Cornforth), great Australian guy and close friend. Australians you want to be proud of this guy, he's such a great man. In this article "Scientists as Citizens" he says: There is what I call public truth, the obligation to record what you have done as accurately as you can, never fabricating, never distorting and never suppressing findings unfavourable to your conclusions. Private truth is even more important. As a scientist interacting with your experiments, you receive an education in the implacability of truth. And your own capacity to be deceived by your expectations, your hopes or just your stupidity that is unlike any other experience I know. I know scientists who are able to go through this and just overlook these things. They should know better." I won't go on, there's a lot more there. You can see it on our website. Now my view is that knowledge cannot guarantee good decisions but common sense suggests that wisdom is an unlikely consequence of ignorance. And why... what do we need? Well, we really need education. We can teach young children at the age of 6, 7 and 8 algebra. And I do that with young children all over the world. Ok, in Japan, Santa Barbara, Mexico, Malaysia, by internet to Iceland, across the whole of Australia. And when I show this sometimes in England there are screams of young woman in the background. But it's not me, it's the bloke on the left that they're sort of... he was at Manchester United. Oh, I love this guy; he's the only guy who has found a use for C60 molecule. But this is my favourite image which shows that science can bring people together from totally different races and that's important. In fact the best reason for being a scientist, that it's the only truly international family. And the reason is we're not personal; it's the universe that is our task master. And here you see the group with my 2 colleagues who aren't here, our group in the UK. And here's another group and you see the internationality of the group in Florida State. Prishan is in the audience here from India or was there. Actually Paul Dirac never comes in at all, never mind. But he was, I mean I don't know, I just would like him to come because we do have some problems that he might be able to solve. So, I set up the Vega Science Trust many years ago to make programs for television and we got Max Perutz, we got fantastic programs by Feynman which were given to us from Auckland. And we had pioneered a new concept in TV debate and that's that participants should actually know something. They're on that website. However, something has happened. Something fantastic has happened. How many of you have looked at an encyclopaedia? This week? Yes that's what we were faced. But you have a revolution. I call it basically the "Goo You Wiki World". And it's a fantastic revolution ok. If you want an image, you used to have to go to Encyclopaedia Britannica. That was not too imaginative but if you go to the Google image browser and put all those in, what you will get are pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and you will even get rotating buckeyballs. Now, that's very difficult to get in Encyclopaedia Britannia. It's a triple revolution, a fantastic revolution, a paradigm shift in seeking, finding, accessing information in seconds. You can create your own material, you can be creative, you can add to that knowledge. And Wikipedia I think is one of the greatest things ever invented. Half a million people contributing their knowledge, their passion, what they're interested in for you, altruistically and anonymously. We're creating something a little bit associated, a global cash of your own links, and you can help. It's GYWW 2.0; I call it GEOSET, Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology. We use a capture station. We're using the technology that's going on here. You've got to see it is exactly the same thing; we're doing it as well. But we're enabling you to do it, not just bloody Nobel laureates, you can do it yourself. And we can show you how to do it. And we're doing that with our students. It's the future of broadcasting basically. John Cornforth who is an Australian, he hated Murdock and he sent him a question, he says: John hated him 15 years ago; he's an Australian. He was ashamed that Murdoch was an Australian. And he said: "Did you lose your respect for the truth gradually or did you never have it?" That was Rupert Murdoch, 15 years ago. I'm going to show you what our students are doing. I've got to show you this because they're just fantastic. Hi, my name is Kerry Gilmore and I am a graduate student here at Florida State University. I work for Doctor L. Coogan as an organic chemist. Now, I love organic chemistry because it provides you the opportunity to go through and be an architect, an engineer, builder, because you can go through and you can really look at designing... I'm going to have to cut it off because there are just a few things I want to say. But our students are doing fantastic work. Just google GEOSET, you'll see something on wolves and secret agents and if you want to know what I'm doing here, you'll find it. We've revolutionised the résumé, ok. Basically we've put you on top of the pile. If you want a job, you can get it by working in this way. Assessment, basically instead of that I can do this and I can assess you drinking a glass of wine, ok. Hall of fame, our students are getting jobs and scholarships. Fully a Fulbright, we got a rich media award. Prishan, 4 tenure-track offers, got into medical school, got a job, got a scholarship, got into vet school, got a Gold Water Scholarship, got a job at NHK. This is the important one, Sino in Japan, a postdoc sent her presentation to India and she got a job at the Mahatma Gandhi University. So these are the people that are associated and someone who knows where we are is my wife Margaret over here. I don't have time for this. I've got 2 other things I want to say. The first is about attitude. Basically they tell you that you should enjoy things, it's not quite the same as that. Basically just do things, give it your best shot. Don't do anything second rate. Just don't do it if it's second rate. If second rate doesn't satisfy you, don't do it. Only be satisfied yourself, not the teacher or something else, not whoever you're working for, if you do that you'll really do well. My favourite poster I want to show you this. Basically I'm an alien creature. I was sent from another planet with a message of goodwill from my people. The message says: And we will give you a coupon for 10% off all deep dish pizzas too. Sincerely, Bob." Peace and harmony, I'm sure about this. Isn't it incredible that our politicians can't solve problems without sending young people like you to go and kill each other? We've got to solve that problem, that's the first important one. But there's a sense of humour in pizza. Without the pizza I don't think I could go on living, ok. Leonard Cohan said in Rolling Stone: I think of the pessimist as someone who is waiting for it to rain and I feel soaked to the skin." Me I'm an optimist, I'll be well out of here when the shit hits the fan. Science only tells you how to think, all other constricts what to think. Think about it. If you're interested in this contact me. Thank you very much. Applause.

Ich freue mich, wieder hier in Lindau zu sein und einen Vortrag halten zu dürfen. Das hier ist ein großartiger Ort und ich komme sehr gerne hierher. Mein Thema heißt "Science - Lost in Translation". Aber zunächst mal das: Wie kam ich hierher? Ich war ja auch mal so jung wie Sie. Viele von uns waren einmal so jung wie einige von Ihnen. Deshalb zeige ich Ihnen, was in der Schule passiert ist, denn dort begann alles. Eigentlich wollte ich gar kein Wissenschaftler werden. Ich träumte davon, Superman zu sein. Und wie alle Wissenschaftler wissen, ist die Evidenz entscheidend. Und hier ist sie. Fliegen war schwierig, weshalb ich mich mit anderen Dingen wie Tennisspielen oder Turnen beschäftigte. Und ich spielte in einem Theaterstück, Henry V., in der Schule und möchte Ihnen gerne diese beiden Jungens hier zeigen. Ich bin der hübsche Junge rechts - nur für den Fall, dass Ihnen das nicht aufgefallen ist. Und ich rate jungen Menschen wie Ihnen immer: Werden Sie bloß nicht Schauspieler, weil der Typ da vorne jetzt 5.000 Jahre alt ist und ich bin viel jünger als er. Werden Sie Wissenschaftler, nicht Schauspieler! Nun gut, Ian und ich sind in dieselbe Klasse gegangen. Ein fantastischer Schauspieler. Er hat uns mal vor einigen Jahren in Tallahassee besucht. So ist das also. Vielleicht sind für mich Dinge wie Kunst und Graphik noch wichtiger als die Wissenschaft. Ich habe viele Zeichnungen angefertigt und während des Studiums Plakate und Sachen dieser Art entworfen, beispielsweise auch das Titelblatt des Hochschulmagazins. Ich glaube, dass es sehr wichtig ist, seine kreativen Fähigkeiten auch auf andere Facetten zu erweitern. Meine erste Auszeichnung erhielt ich tatsächlich nicht für eine wissenschaftliche Arbeit, sondern für diesen Entwurf hier. Und das wurde in der nationalen Zeitung veröffentlicht. So sah ich damals aus. Heute bin ich alt und gebrechlich. Und auch Sie, die Sie heute so jung und schön sind, werden irgendwann eines Tages so aussehen wie ich, sodass ich meine Revanche habe. Ja, Malen und solche Dinge... Ich weiß nicht so genau, was hier jetzt kommt und überschlage das mal schnell. Das sind also alles Dinge, die mich auch interessieren und das ist Margaret, meine Frau, die hier im Publikum sitzt. Und heute entwerfe ich auch Logos und das ist mein Favorit für die Australier, die hier vertreten sind. Ich hoffe also, dass Sie bessere Fußballer sind als die Engländer, besser als im Kricket, wie wir wissen. Ich mag es immer wieder, mir neue Dinge einfallen zu lassen. Und tatsächlich habe ich dieses Darwin-T-Shirt entworfen und... Prishant, wo bist du? Bist du da irgendwo? Ja, da. Das ist tatsächlich das von mir entworfene T-Shirt. Das ist ein Geheimbund, das ist Darwins Stammbaum. Okay, das ist mein früherer Kollege. Das hier ist mein neuester Autoaufkleber, den ich für sehr bedeutend halte. Und ich habe die japanische Flagge umgestaltet. Ich hoffe, das gefällt Ihnen. Was man in den 60er Jahren außerdem noch können musste, war Gitarre spielen. Oder man kam auf keine Party. Das habe ich dann also auch gemacht. Aber ich glaube, was mich mehr als alles andere zum Chemiker gemacht hat, war die Fotografie. Ich möchte Ihnen gerne zeigen, was es damals bedeutete zu fotografieren. Ich denke, Doug Osheroff kennt das, weil er doch die größte Kamera auf dem Campus besitzt. Man brauchte natürlich auch einen Anreiz dafür. Den hatte ich natürlich auch. Sie sitzt dort im Publikum. Aber heute braucht man nur noch das hier. Und es ist so viel verloren gegangen. Das steht für eine Technologie, die so unvorhersehbar ist. Deshalb lässt sich heute nur schwer vorhersagen, was geschehen wird. Ich hatte natürlich auch einen Meccano-Metallbaukasten. Ich möchte Ihnen gerne eine Anzeige aus der damaligen Zeit zeigen. Das ging ungefähr so: "Meccano-Jungs" - und heute würde man natürlich die Mädchen auch einbeziehen - das je mit Meccano gespielt hat, könnte sich wohl zu einem Bad Boy (oder Bad Girl) entwickeln". Aber hier sehen Sie es: Wir haben unsere Hände benutzt und Dinge zusammengebastelt. Und das versinnbildlicht, was Wissenschaft ist. Wissenschaft heißt nicht herumrennen und sich vergnügen. Es bedeutet, sich von etwas völlig absorbieren zu lassen. Ich habe früher Sachen aus Muttern und Bolzen gebaut. Und heute sind es Elektronen und Atome. Grundsätzlich besteht da also kein so großer Unterschied. Und mit meinem jüngsten Sohn, einem Karikaturisten, habe ich vor Kurzem gemeinsam in Japan ein Buch für Kinder produziert. Eine andere wichtige Sache war für mich immer die Architektur. Das hat mich fasziniert. Irgendwie hätte ich auch dort enden können. Diese Zeichnung, die ich vom Rathaus in Stockholm angefertigt habe, wo ja der Nobelpreis überreicht wird, ist lange vor der Zeit entstanden, in der ich überhaupt wusste, was der Nobelpreis ist. Ich war so fasziniert von dem Gebäude und auch von Le Corbusier und dem Bild von Frank LloydWright. In Sussex, wo ich 37 Jahre gelebt habe, gibt es interessante Architektur zu sehen. Ich habe mit solchen Motiven gespielt. Aber die Architektur, die wirklich am Bedeutendsten war, war diese: der Buckminster-Fuller-Dom bei der Expo, den wir besuchten. Und das war wirklich entscheidend für die Aufklärung der Struktur von C60. Hier ist das zu sehen. Man kann auch nie wissen, wann die eigenen Ideen vielleicht Bedeutung erhalten. Und das ist, glaube ich, heutzutage ein wichtiges Thema. Gut, ich komme jetzt zum eigentlichen Thema "Science - Lost in Translation". Und ich widme das Giordano Bruno. Wer von Ihnen kennt Giordano Bruno? Falls nicht, beschäftigen Sie sich einmal mit ihm ...weil er...ich halte nicht viel von Heiligen, aber wenn es einen Heiligen gibt, dann ist er der Heilige der Wissenschaft. Ich bin im Grunde genommen nicht hier, damit Sie sich wohlfühlen, sondern ich bin hier, um Sie zum Denken anzuregen. Wenn ich diesen Vortrag halte, zitiere ich meistens diesen Spruch von Don Marquis: Wenn Du sie wirklich zum Denken bringst, werden sie Dich hassen." Vielleicht hassen Sie mich ja am Ende dieses Vortrages, aber zumindest habe ich Sie zum Denken gebracht. Na also. Ich möchte mit meinem absoluten Liebling beginnen. Es ist der australische Wissenschaftler John Cornforth, der seit seinem 18. Lebensjahr taub ist. Und er hat einen fantastischen Aufsatz geschrieben, den Sie alle lesen sollten, nämlich "Scientists as Citizens" (Wissenschaftler sind Bürger. Sie finden das auf meiner Vega-Website. dass ein auf Zweifeln basierendes Wissenssystem die treibende Kraft für die Entwicklung der modernen Zivilisation sein konnte. Wissenschaftler glauben nicht, sondern sie überprüfen. Ich bitte Sie nicht darum, irgendetwas von dem zu glauben, was ich über wissenschaftliche - und ich würde sagen über alle - Fragen zu sagen habe. Es sollte für alles ein Nachweis erbracht werden. Ich kenne die Beschaffenheit eines solchen Nachweises und kann seinen Wert beurteilen." Das ist eine kraftvolle Aussage. Richard Feynman sagt in seinem Buch "The Meaning of it All" - ich mag dieses Buch sehr - das Folgende: Sie ist entstanden aus einem Kampf. Es war der Kampf darum, zweifeln zu dürfen, um sicher sein zu dürfen. Und ich möchte die Bedeutung dieses Kampfes nie vergessen und ich möchte darin auch nie nachlassen. Wenn man weiß, dass man unsicher ist, hat man die Möglichkeit, die Situation zu verändern." Und ich liebe auch diese Zeile: Den gesunden Menschenverstand (Common Sense). Der ist interessant, weil er uns sagt, dass sich die Sonne um die Erde dreht. Wer stimmt mir zu? Das bleibt verdammt noch mal zu hoffen. Sie startet hier und endet dort. Der gesunde Menschenverstand sagt uns, dass sich die Sonne um die Erde bewegt. Wer stimmt mir jetzt immer noch zu? Ja. Der außerordentliche Verstand (Uncommon Sense) sagt uns, dass sich die Erde um ihre eigene Achse dreht und dass es so erscheint wie hier. Das ist der außerordentliche Verstand und Mut von Menschen wie Copernicus, Galileo und Giordano Bruno. Schauen Sie sich das doch im Internet an und sehen Sie sich den Kinofilm von Carlo Ponte über Giordano Bruno an. Sie werden das nie vergessen, weil diese Menschen dafür gekämpft haben, dass Sie heute die Freiheit des Zweifels leben können. Inzwischen haben die meisten Menschen die Behauptung akzeptiert, dass sich die Erde um die Sonne bewegt. Wie viele akzeptieren das? Fast alle. Und wer kennt den Beweis? Nicht so viele, mehr als gewöhnlich, weil hier doch einige Physiker vertreten sind. Aber auch viele von denen kennen den Beweis dafür nicht. Aber was - und darum geht es hier - was haben Sie noch alles akzeptiert, ohne den Nachweis dafür zu kennen? Viele Menschen, wahrscheinlich der Großteil, schätzungsweise 90%, 95% akzeptieren Aussagen, für die sie überhaupt keinen Nachweis haben. Denken Sie darüber nach. Die Royal Society hat das Motto "Nullius in verba", was soviel bedeutet wie: "Nach Niemandes Worten". Glauben Sie niemandem, auch mir nicht oder meinen Kollegen, bloß weil sie Nobelpreisträger sind. Hören Sie zu, was sie zu sagen haben, aber bewerten Sie das auch. Denken Sie darüber als Wissenschaftler nach. Das Problem ist, dass heute der Nonsens verbreitet ist. Und ich möchte Ihnen ein wunderbares Beispiel für die Kreativität des Kentucky Fried Creation Museum in Cincinnati geben. Das hat 27 Millionen Dollar gekostet. Busladungen von Kindern werden dahin gekarrt und andere Gruppen ebenfalls. Deshalb lebten Dinosaurier und Menschen zur gleichen Zeit." Wenn das wirklich der Fall war, haben wir die Dinosaurier wahrscheinlich auch gesattelt und sind darauf herum geritten. Und "Was haben Dinosaurier ursprünglich gefressen?" "Bevor Adam gesündigt hat, waren alle Tiere - auch die Dinosaurier - Vegetarier." Man braucht nicht solche ein Gebiss, um Salat zu essen. ertranken (vor rund 4350 Jahren) in den Fluten und viele wurden begraben und sind als Fossil erhalten geblieben." Ich habe doch tatsächlich Lehrer in Florida getroffen, Naturkundelehrer, die das behaupten. Denken Sie darüber nach. Das ist die Arche Noah und das ist Noah. Und er ist Schotte. Sind hier Schotten unter uns? Sie haben das wahrscheinlich nicht gewusst, aber er hat einen schottischen Akzent: Im Laufe meines Lebens wurden wunderbare und fantastische Dinge entdeckt. Das ist offensichtlich ein italienischer Fußballfan letzte Woche. Oder ein englischer Fußballfan eine Woche vorher. Na also. 70% Übereinstimmung mit diesem Kerl und 50% mit den Genen einer Fruchtfliege und auch mit den Maden. Und das hier mag ich: 70% unserer Gene entsprechen denen von einem Kürbis. Und man braucht sich doch nur den durchschnittlichen Politiker anzuschauen, um tatsächlich den Nachweis dafür zu erhalten ... Es gibt mehr Beweise für die Evolution als für jede andere Wahrheit, die wir entdeckt haben. Der Angriff auf die Evolution ist nicht nur eine Attacke auf Darwin. Es ist ein Angriff auf die gesamten Wissenschaften, weil die Beweise aus diesen Bereichen kommen. Und wir müssen dagegen angehen und das auch einigen sehr dummen Menschen eintrichtern, auch solchen, die Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten werden wollen. Niemand hat die Wissenschaften besser beschrieben als der großartige amerikanische Autor Walt Whitman. Das ist der großartige Schriftsteller, die großartige Zeile, die doppelte Auslegung. Es hält die Möglichkeiten offen. Whitman hat etwas Wichtiges, wirklich sehr Wichtiges aufgeschrieben. Konstrukte sind allesamt für immer eingesperrt, möglicherweise Tausende von Jahren, in unerschütterlichen dogmatischen Positionen, unempfindlich gegen rationale Kritik. Es gibt keine Möglichkeit des Angriffs. Selbst einige Wissenschaften, die es besser wissen sollten, sehen das nicht ein. Das wird daran deutlich, was sie schreiben. Der große Feind der Wahrheit ist oft nicht die bewusste, erfundene und unehrliche Lüge, sondern der hartnäckige und überzeugende und unrealistische Mythos. Der Glaube an Mythen ermöglicht die Bequemlichkeit einer Meinung ohne die Unbequemlichkeit des Denkens." Vielleicht erstaunt Sie, wer das hier gesagt hat. Es war Kennedy. Das war ein großer Satz. Und was sagt Feynman, der begnadetste Kommunikator, den ich je erlebt habe, dazu? Wenn man an dem ultimativen Charakter der physikalischen Welt, der gesamten Welt interessiert ist - und in der gegenwärtigen Zeit besteht unsere einzige Möglichkeit, sie zu verstehen, in einer Form von mathematischen Überlegungen - kann man, so meine ich, all diese speziellen Aspekte der Welt, die großartige Tiefe und die Merkmale der Universalität der Gesetze, der Beziehungen der Dinge untereinander nicht voll und ganz ohne ein mathematisches Grundverständnis erfassen. Ich glaube bzw. kenne keinen anderen Weg. Wir kennen keine andere Möglichkeit, das ohne diese Grundlage exakt und gut zu beschreiben oder die Wirkzusammenhänge zu sehen. Deshalb wird jemand, glaube ich, der nicht ein wenig mathematisches Gespür entwickelt hat, nicht in der Lage sein, diese Aspekte der Welt in vollem Umfang zu erfassen. Missverstehen Sie mich bitte nicht. Es gibt viele, viele Aspekte der Welt, für die man keine Mathematik benötigt, etwa für die Liebe, die man mit voller Bewunderung und Ergötzlichkeit schätzen kann und die einem Ehrfurcht einflößen und geheimnisvoll erscheinen kann. Und ich will auch gar nicht behaupten, dass die Physik das Einzige in der Welt ist. Aber Sie haben über die Physik gesprochen und wenn man darüber spricht, ist die Tatsache, nichts über Mathematik zu wissen, eine große Einschränkung für das Weltverständnis. Das ist ein Zitat aus einem phantastischen Film, den einer meiner Freunde, Chris Sykes, gedreht hat. Wenn Sie die Möglichkeit haben, schauen Sie sich diesen Film an. Das ist wirklich ein Stück Wissenschaft im Film. Lassen Sie uns also über Mathematik nachdenken. Die geht mit Sicherheit auf die Indianer zurück. Aber auch Al-Khwarizmi hat im 8. Jahrhundert, im 7. oder 8. Jahrhundert, dieses Buch geschrieben. Und er hat die Regeln der Algebra formuliert, aber in Form von Worten, in Prosa, nicht in Form von Gleichungen. Diophantus schrieb im zweiten Jahrhundert tatsächlich Gleichungen auf. Hier sind einige ... hier sehen Sie die Art, in der sie aufgeschrieben wurden. Und die kann man lösen. Das reicht also wirklich weit zurück. Aber das erste Buch in englischer Sprache wurde von Robert Recorde geschrieben. Und das ist interessant, weil er in seinem ersten Buch das Gleichheitszeichen erfand. Und in diesem Buch wird auch erklärt, wie man subtrahiert. Das war so um 1550 herum. Es geht also mit Sicherheit so weit zurück. Und es soll Menschen geben, die die Mathematik tatsächlich lieben und ich dachte ... Hier sind sie. Und hier an dieser Stelle fehlt tatsächlich etwas [in der Formel]. Das ist wunderbar, weil wir hier junge Menschen erleben, die bereit sind, etwas Wunderbares in der Wissenschaft und der Mathematik zu entdecken. Ich überschlage das mal. Das war gerade LSD, nur für den Fall, dass Sie das synthetisch herstellen möchten. Aber schauen Sie sich das hier an, Nicole, eine Doktorandin der Physik. Sie sagt: "Mein Tattoo ist die Sinusexpansion von Taylor. Für mich ist das das schönste, was ich jemals gelernt habe." Hören Sie sich das an. Und glauben Sie das oder auch nicht. Wir waren vor zwei Jahren im Garten vor der Inselhalle. Und dort spazierte mein Lieblingstattoo vorbei. Diese Nicole aus Stanford war tatsächlich vor zwei Jahren hier. Und ich war tatsächlich in der Lage, das Gesamtbild zu fotografieren, nein nicht alles, weil das ja in der Unendlichkeit verschwindet. Das wäre doch sehr durchtrieben gewesen, das Ganze zu fotografieren. Aber egal. Das hier ist Nicole, eine wunderbare Studentin, die 2010 in Lindau war. Lassen Sie uns jetzt also über die Wissenschaft nachdenken und wie alt sie ist. Sie ist nicht wirklich sehr alt. Abaelard hat im 12. Jahrhundert so ungefähr das Folgende gesagt: "Indem wir nämlich zweifeln, gelangen wir zur Untersuchung und durch diese erfassen wir die Wahrheit." Und das ist eine sehr grundlegende Aussage über die Wissenschaft. Denn Zweifel und Hinterfragungen sind die eigentliche Bedrohung für Menschen, die an Dogmen glauben und diese für ihre Autoritätsposition nutzen. Und Abaelard zählt zu denjenigen, die wirklich in Teufelsküche usw. gekommen sind. In seinem interessanterweise als "Novum Organum" (Neues Instrument) betitelten Buch beschrieb Francis Bacon die Grundlagen wissenschaftlicher Methodik. Herausfinden, was an sich wahr ist. Wenn es für einen selbst Bedeutung hat, muss das nicht für alle anderen auch gelten, bestimmt nicht für Leute, die ich hier nicht zu nennen brauche. Beobachtung, Hypothese, unterstützende Nachweise und physikalisches Gesetz. Wenn wir Abaelards Aussage umkehren, kommen wir zum tiefgründigsten Axiom aller Zeiten: Wenn wir die Wahrheit finden wollen, müssen wir zweifeln und untersuchen und dürfen nichts akzeptieren. Das hat enorme Folgen. Das neue Instrument untergräbt die Annahmen und Behauptungen, die zuvor mehr als 1.000 Jahre lang dominiert hatten, dass nämlich die fundamentale Wahrheit in der Heiligen Schrift zu finden sei. Und viele, die diesem Axiom folgten, befanden sich in heftigen Konflikten mit der dogmagestützten Autorität. Viele von ihnen wurden ermordet, so auch Giordano Bruno. Und deshalb ist es mir ein Anliegen, ihm diesen Vortrag hier zu widmen. Wir sind es ihm schuldig für die Freiheiten, die wir heute haben, alles zu hinterfragen und anzuzweifeln. Und wenn man sich anschaut, dann herrscht genau an den Orten, wo die Naturphilosophie das Dogma grundlegend unterhöhlt hat, Demokratie und Wissenschaft. Das ist eine interessante Beobachtung. Aber wer war eigentlich der erste Physiker? Hier kommt ein weiteres Zitat. Ich mag Zitate und dieses ganz besonders: "Ich suche nicht die Antwort, sondern will die Frage verstehen." Was ist Physik? Übrigens mag ich dieses Zitat wirklich sehr und habe deshalb mal bei Google versucht herauszufinden, wer das tatsächlich gesagt hat. Und dort entdeckte ich, dass ich es war. Wenn man das aber dann etwas verändert in "die Antwort herauszufinden", entdeckt man, dass es Kung Fu war. Großartig, machen wir weiter. Also wahrscheinlich Konfuzianismus und Taoismus. Es stellt sich also die Frage, was Physik ist. Was wir aber eigentlich wissen müssen, ist, wer die erste Gleichung in der Physik aufgeschrieben hat. Schauen wir doch zunächst auf das Einfachste, das Hookesche Gesetz, Vorlesungen zur Feder. Hooke hat das so beschrieben: "Die Kraft einer Feder ist proportional zu ihrer Spannung. Das heißt: Bei einer Energieeinheit wird die Feder um eine Raumeinheit gedehnt oder verformt, bei zwei Energieeinheiten um zwei usw. Die Theorie ist also sehr kurz und die Möglichkeit, das auszuprobieren, sehr einfach." Also das ist die grundlegende Botschaft. Wenn man dort etwas hinzugibt, wirkt es sich an dieser Stelle aus. Okay. Das Hookesche Gesetz, keine Gleichung. Wer war es dann? Das ist eine interessante Frage. Christiaan Huygens soll es gewesen sein, aber ich habe dazu eigentlich nichts gefunden. Er wusste etwas über Impulsüberträge. Aber ich muss erst noch die Bestätigung dafür finden, dass er auch tatsächlich die ersten Gleichungen aufgeschrieben hat. Die Wissenschaft begann mit diesem Typen hier. Okay. Ich bin bereit, das zu begründen. Das ist ein fantastisches Gerät. Und schauen Sie sich nur die außergewöhnliche Schönheit dieser Gravur an. Er hat das verwendet, um die Bahnen der Planeten zu messen. Aber es war Kepler, der diese Daten in die Hände bekam und in diesem Buch ... Er musste tatsächlich seine eigenen Logarithmen entwickeln, um die Berechnungen anzustellen. Er wies nach, dass die Bahn des Mars eine Ellipse ist und die Sonne in einem Fokus liegt. Das war der Moment, an dem die Wissenschaft begann. Und das ist in den Tabulae Rudolphine festgehalten. Dann kam Newton und erklärte das. Ein entscheidender Mann, von dem ich nie gehört hatte, ist Willem 's Gravesande, der in seinem Buch schreibt (liest Französisch): "Herr Leibnitz war der erste, der darauf hinwies, dass die Kraft (kinetische Energie) eines sich bewegenden Körpers nicht proportional zur Geschwindigkeit ist, wie es der üblichen Auffassung entspricht, sondern proportional zum Quadrat dieses Wertes, sodass die Geschwindigkeit sich verdoppelt, wenn sich die Kraft (kinetische Energie) vervierfacht." Typisch Engländer, der versucht Französisch zu sprechen. Aber dabei bleibt es dann auch. Es war also Leibniz, der nachwies, dass die kinetische Energie 1/2 mV^2 ist. Und es war Willem 's Gravesande, der das durch Fallenlassen von Bällen in Weichkaolin nachweisen konnte. Das war ein wichtiger Punkt. Und es war Émilie du Châtelet, die Newton bezüglich der kinetischen Energie korrigierte, denn er hatte das für einen Impuls gehalten. Kalkül war erforderlich, wie Sie wissen. Und es geht grundsätzlich um die Fähigkeit, das zu integrieren. Und das ist meiner Meinung nach nicht mit Worten möglich. Was man dann als Ergebnis erhält, ist die wunderschöne Parabolkurve des harmonischen Quantenoszillators. Das braucht man für die Wissenschaften. Und das ist wirklich wichtig. Jetzt kommen wir zu einem bedeutenden Menschen, nämlich Einstein. Und Einstein hat, wie Sie wissen, die Relativitätstheorie entwickelt. Und die wurde von einigen Menschen angegriffen, unter anderem von Cardinal O'Connell, der sagte: die einen grundlegenden Zweifel an Gott und seiner Schöpfung verbreitet haben." Ein New Yorker Rabbiner schickte Einstein ein Telegramm mit der Frage "Glauben Sie an Gott, Albert?" der sich mit Schicksalen und Handlungen der Menschen abgibt." Das ist eine interessante Aussage. Wer war eigentlich dieser Spinoza? Er lebte in Amsterdam. Er skizzierte in präziser Detailtreue seine philosophischen Einsichten und untermauerte sie mit logischen Argumenten, die ihm zufolge unwiderlegbar waren. Die Obrigkeiten der Synagoge sahen keine andere Alternative, als ihn aus ihrer Gemeinschaft auszuschließen. Ein bombastisches Horn wurde geblasen. Die Kerzen wurden nach und nach gelöscht und ein Fluch wurde vorgelesen: Verflucht sei er Tag für Tag. Und verflucht sei er Nacht für Nacht. Und verflucht sei er, wenn er sich niederlegt und wenn er aufsteht. Wenn er ausgeht und auch, wenn er wieder zurückkehrt." Niemand darf mehr auch nur ein Wort zu ihm sprechen oder schreiben oder ihm Gnade erweisen, mit ihm unter einem Dach leben oder sich ihm auf weniger als vier Ellenlängen nähern oder etwas lesen, was er geschrieben hat." Sie sollten unbedingt Texte von diesem Menschen lesen, der sich auf diese Art und Weise empfohlen hat. Aber leider ist alles in Lateinisch. Aber dann gibt es auch noch das Buch von Strathern: "Ein universeller Gott, der nur durch Anwendung von Vernunft auf die Welt um uns herum richtig verstanden werden kann. Das lässt vermuten, dass Spinozas Religion der Ernüchterung tatsächlich eine überzeugende Beschreibung der modernen Wissenschaft sein könnte. Ein pantheistisches Universum, dessen Wahrheit wir nur durch Gebrauch von Vernunft, Mathematik und rationalem Experiment verstehen können." Und das machen wir hier. Wir haben das Higgs-Boson hier nicht dabei, aber vielleicht ist auch das irgendwann der Fall. Die ordentliche Harmonie dessen, was existiert. Lassen Sie uns die Zahlen 1, 3 und 5 nehmen und die Chemie anschauen, weil ich Chemiker bin. Ich weiß, dass ich unter all den Physikern unter Ihnen ein Eindringling bin, aber hier bin ich nun mal. Die Erde dreht sich um die Sonne. Wir arbeiten mit der klassischen Mechanik. Für ein Elektron, das um einen Kern kreist, arbeiten wir mit der Quantenmechanik. Aber laut Quantenmechanik kann ein sich drehendes Objekt nur bestimmte Ausrichtungen aufweisen. Richtig? Es sind nicht alle Ausrichtungen zulässig. Und die Quantenzahl j hat die Werte 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. Und die Ausrichtungen werden durch eine sehr einfache Formel, nämlich 2j+1, angegeben. Wenn also j=0, dann ist 2j+1=1. Wenn j=1, dann ist 2j+1=3 und wenn j=2, dann ist 2j+1=5, richtig? Also 1, 3 und 5. Und wenn ich jetzt hingehe und das verdopple, also diese Reihe und diese Reihe verdopple, das dorthin bewege und das dorthin, diese Reihe verdopple und diese Reihe verdopple, das hier verdopple und das hier verdopple und das hier bewege und das so: Was ist dann das Ergebnis? Damit ist die gesamte Chemie erklärt, das gesamte Leben und das gesamte sinnvolle bisschen Physik, wenn es das überhaupt gibt. Okay, wir Chemiker müssen es den großartigen Meistern der Wissenschaften heimzahlen. Natürlich ist die Physik der alles überspannende Bogen der Wissenschaften. Aber Chemie repräsentiert diesen enormen Teil der Physik, der uns betrifft, also die Alltagswelt, die Biologie und all diese Dinge. Und das basiert auf den Zahlen 1, 3 und 5. Das ist Wissenschaft, etwas so Elegantes und Schönes. Und der Wert für die Menschheit ist enorm wichtig. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie es war, als wir Amputationen ohne Anästhesie durchführen mussten. Da helfen auch keine iPhones weiter. Schauen Sie sich das gut an. Ja, genauso sah es aus. Die Menschen starben im Schock. Es kann kaum einen humaneren Beitrag für die Menschheit geben als die aus der Chemie stammende Anästhesie. Penicillin, dieses simple Molekül, ist wirklich ein Wunder. Man muss nicht beten. Dieses kleine Mädchen wurde 1942 innerhalb von drei Wochen geheilt. Ein Jahr früher wäre es noch gestorben. Und einer der Helden ist diese kaum bekannte Person. Künftige Bakterien werden unempfindlich gegenüber Antibiotika sein. Denken Sie darüber nach. Wir brauchen so brillante junge Menschen wie Sie, damit wir die Probleme der Zukunft lösen können. Manchmal werden auch nicht die Richtigen gewürdigt. Es gibt die interessante Geschichte eines Mannes aus Tallahassee, wo wir neun Monate des Jahres verbringen. Alan Cross saß 24 Jahre in einem Gefängnis in Florida für ein Verbrechen ein, das er nicht begangen hat. Bei seiner Entlassung aus dem Gefängnis sagte er: "Dieser Zeitpunkt hat lange auf sich warten lassen. Ich danke Gott für diesen Tag." Sein Vertrauen ließ ihn durchhalten. Unglaublicher Mensch. Aber die Wissenschaft hat ihn aus dem Gefängnis geholt. Und wer war der Erfinder? Alec Jeffrey, ein Freund von mir von der Leicester University, der die DNS-Spurenidentifikationsmethode entwickelte. Die Wissenschaft ist ein humanitäres Konstrukt. Und was ist das? Wir haben ja ein bisschen darüber erfahren und ich komme jetzt zu meiner Analyse. Die Wissenschaft hat verschiedene Aspekte. Einer ist das Wissen, ein anderer die Anwendung dieses Wissens, die Technologie. Ein weiterer sehr bedeutender Aspekt ist der Weg, auf dem das wissenschaftliche Wissen tatsächlich entdeckt wird. Aber dann gibt es auch noch etwas viel Wichtigeres. Und weil die Wissenschaft so nützlich ist, haben viele Menschen das vergessen. Sie verstehen nicht, was das ist. Im Grunde genommen haben auch Politiker keine Ahnung davon. Sie denken, dass man Wissenschaft nur deshalb betreibt, weil sie zweckmäßig ist. Aber bevor die Wissenschaft nützlich wurde, hatte sie eine andere Bezeichnung. Sie wurde als Naturphilosophie bezeichnet. Und der bei weitem bedeutendste Aspekt ist, dass die Naturphilosophie das einzige philosophische Konstrukt ist, das wir mit dem Ziel entwickelt haben, die Wahrheit mit einem gewissen Grad der Zuverlässigkeit aufzuklären. Das möchte ich jetzt definieren. Ich sage: Wir haben ein Konstrukt. Das Konstrukt ist das Konstrukt, mit dem die Wahrheit mit einem gewissen Grad der Zuverlässigkeit aufgeklärt wird. Und das definiere ich dann als Naturphilosophie. Und ein ethisches Bildungsziel muss auch darin bestehen, jungen Menschen beizubringen, wie sie feststellen können, ob das, was man ihnen erzählt, tatsächlich wahr ist. Ich bin sicher, dass wir uns darauf einigen müssen. Wenn wir das nicht machen, bekommen wir Probleme. Die Unterrichtung einer skeptischen, evidenzbasierten Beurteilung aller Behauptungen - ausnahmslos - ist eine Frage der intellektuellen Integrität, die alle Lehrer berücksichtigen sollten. Ohne Evidenz ist alles erlaubt, was gefällt. Denken Sie darüber nach. Schauen Sie sich um und finden Sie heraus, dass das Fakt ist. Ich möchte noch einmal auf diesen phantastischen Artikel von "Kappa" (John W. Cornforth), diesen großartigen Australier und guten Freund, zurückkommen. Australier, Ihr könnt wirklich stolz auf diesen Kerl sein. Er ist ein so großartiger Mensch. In seinem Aufsatz "Scientists as Citizens" sagt er: Das ist das, was ich als öffentliche Wahrheit bezeichne, nämlich die Verpflichtung, alles, was man getan hat, so exakt wie möglich zu erfassen und niemals Ergebnisse zu erfinden, zu verdrehen und zu unterdrücken, die ungünstig für die eigenen Schlussfolgerungen sind. Die persönliche Wahrheit ist sogar noch wichtiger. Als Wissenschaftler, der mit Experimenten umgeht, erhalten Sie eine Ausbildung in der Unerbittlichkeit der Wahrheit und Ihrer eigenen Fähigkeit, sich von den eigenen Erwartungen, Hoffnungen oder nur der eigenen Dummheit täuschen zu lassen. Das lässt sich mit keiner anderen Erfahrung vergleichen, die ich kenne. Ich kenne Wissenschaftler, die wirklich darüber hinweg gehen und diese Dinge einfach übersehen. Sie sollten es eigentlich besser wissen." Ich höre hier auf, obwohl es noch viel mehr zu sagen gäbe. Das können Sie alles auf unserer Website nachlesen. Meiner Ansicht nach garantiert Wissen keine guten Entscheidungen. Aber der gesunde Menschenverstand legt nahe, dass Weisheit eine unwahrscheinliche Konsequenz von Ignoranz ist. Und warum ... was brauchen wir? Nun, wir brauchen wirklich Bildung. Wir können Kindern im Alter von 6, 7 und 8 die Algebra beibringen. Und ich mache das mit Kindern in der ganzen Welt, in Japan, Santa Barbara, Mexiko, Malaysia, per Internet in Island und in ganz Australien. Wenn ich das hier in England zeige, gibt es manchmal hysterische Schreie von jungen Frauen. Die gelten aber dann nicht mir, sondern diesem Kerl links. Der ist irgendwie ... er war mal bei Manchester United. Oh, ich mag diesen Kerl wirklich. Er ist der Einzige, der eine Verwendung für das C60-Molekül gefunden hat. Aber das hier ist mein Lieblingsbild, weil es zeigt, dass die Wissenschaft Menschen der unterschiedlichsten Völker zusammenbringt. Und das ist wichtig. Der beste Grund, Wissenschaftler zu werden, ist doch, dass das die einzig wirklich internationale Familie ist. Und der Grund dafür ist, dass wir nicht personenbezogen denken. Unser strenger Vorgesetzter ist das Universum selbst. Und hier sehen Sie das Team mit meinen beiden Kollegen, die nicht hier sind. Das ist unsere Gruppe in Großbritannien. Und hier ist eine weitere Gruppe und Sie erkennen, wie international diese Gruppe in Florida State ist. Prishan aus Indien sitzt hier im Publikum. Er war früher auch dort. Eigentlich kommt Paul Dirac gar nicht mehr zu uns. Egal, aber er kam früher. Ich weiß nicht, ich hätte es einfach gerne, dass er käme, weil wir Probleme haben, die er möglicherweise lösen könnte. Ich habe den Vega Science Trust vor vielen Jahren mit dem Ziel gegründet, Programme für das Fernsehen zu entwickeln. Wir konnten Max Perutz gewinnen und wir hatten phantastische Programme mit Feynman, die wir aus Auckland erhielten. Und wir haben ein neues Konzept für Fernsehdebatten eingeführt. Und das besteht darin, dass die Teilnehmer tatsächlich etwas wissen sollten. Sie sind auf dieser Website zu finden. Allerdings ist etwas Phantastisches passiert. Wer von Ihnen hat in eine Enzyklopädie geschaut? In dieser Woche? Ja, wir standen noch vor dieser Herausforderung. Aber jetzt geschieht etwas Revolutionäres. Ich bezeichne das als "Goo You Wiki World". Und das ist wirklich eine phantastische Revolution. Früher musste man zur Encyclopedia Britannica greifen, wenn man ein Bild brauchte. Das war nicht sehr phantasievoll. Aber wenn man den Bilder-Browser von Google benutzt und alles eingibt, was man sucht, erhält man Seiten über Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und kann sogar rotierende Buckyballs betrachten. Uns so etwas ist natürlich in der Encyclopedia Britannica schwierig zu realisieren. Das ist eine Revolution in dreifachem Sinne, eine phantastische Revolution, eine Paradigmenverschiebung, was das Suchen, Finden und Zugreifen auf Informationen in Sekundenschnelle betrifft. Man kann sein eigenes Material erstellen, kreativ sein, vorhandenes Wissen ergänzen. Und Wikipedia ist meiner Meinung nach eine der großartigsten Einrichtungen, die jemals erfunden wurden. Eine halbe Million Menschen, die ihr Wissen, ihre Leidenschaft, ihre Interessen altruistisch und anonym für uns bereitstellen. Wir schaffen gerade etwas, das auch ein bisschen in diese Richtung geht, ein globales Währungsmittel der eigenen Links. Und Sie können dazu beitragen. Es heißt GYWW 2.0. Ich nenne es GEOSET, Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology. Wir verwenden eine Erfassungsstation. Wir nutzen die Technologie. Das passiert hier. Schauen Sie sich das an. Das ist genau das Gleiche. Wir machen das auch so. Aber wir befähigen Sie dazu, das selbst zu verwenden. Nicht nur diese verdammten Nobelpreisträger. Sie können es selbst verwenden. Und wir zeigen Ihnen, wie das geht. Und wir machen das auch mit unseren Studenten. Das ist eigentlich die Zukunft der Sendetechnik. John Cornforth, ein Australier, hasste Murdock und stellte ihm die folgende Frage: "Haben Sie ...". John hasste ihn seit 15 Jahren. Er ist Australier und schämte sich dafür, dass Murdoch ein Australier war. Und er fragte: "Haben Sie Ihren Respekt vor der Wahrheit allmählich verloren oder hatten Sie den nie?" Das war Rupert Murdoch, vor 15 Jahren. Ich zeige Ihnen, was unsere Studenten machen. Ich möchte Ihnen das zeigen, weil sie einfach so phantastisch sind. Hi, mein Name ist Kerry Gilmore und ich bin Doktorand hier an der Florida State University. Ich arbeite für Doctor L. Coogan als Organiker. Ich liebe die organische Chemie, weil sie mir die Möglichkeit bietet, etwas durchzuexerzieren und Architekt zu sein, Ingenieur zu sein, Konstrukteur zu sein, weil man wirklich etwas durchspielen kann und wirklich etwas entwickeln kann ... Und ich muss das jetzt hier etwas abkürzen, weil ich noch Einiges sagen möchte. Aber unsere Studenten machen wirklich phantastische Arbeit. Googeln Sie einfach GEOSET. Sie finden dort Dinge über Wölfe und Geheimagenten. Und wenn Sie wissen wollen, was ich da mache, finden Sie das auch dort. Wir haben den Lebenslauf revolutioniert. Wir legen Ihre Bewerbung ganz oben auf den Stapel. Wenn Sie einen Job wollen, haben Sie eine Chance, wenn Sie so arbeiten. Assessment. Grundsätzlich kann ich anstelle dessen das hier tun und ein Glas Wein dabei trinken. Die Hall of Fame. Unsere Studenten erhalten Jobs und Stipendien. Fully a Fulbright, wir haben einen tollen Medienpreis bekommen. Prishan hat vier unbefristete Stellen angeboten bekommen, ging zur medizinischen Fakultät, erhielt einen Job, erhielt ein Stipendium, ging zur Akademie, erhielt ein Gold-Water-Stipendium, erhielt einen Job beim NHK. Die hier ist wichtig. Sino in Japan, eine Postdoktorandin, schickte ihre Bewerbung nach Indien und erhielt einen Job an der Mahatma Gandhi University. Das sind also die Menschen, die mit uns verbunden sind. Und jemand, der weiß, wo wir stehen, ist meine Frau Margaret da vorne. Ich habe nicht mehr genug Zeit. Ich möchte aber noch zwei Dinge loswerden. Das eine betrifft die Haltung. Grundsätzlich wird einem immer erzählt, dass man Dinge tun soll, die einen begeistern. Das ist nicht ganz das Gleiche wie das hier: Tun Sie einfach etwas und geben Sie Ihr Bestes. Machen Sie nie etwas Zweitklassiges. Lassen Sie einfach die Finger davon, wenn es zweitklassig wäre. Wenn Sie das Zweitklassige nicht befriedigt, lassen Sie es besser sein. Sorgen Sie dafür, dass Sie selbst zufrieden sind, nicht der Lehrer oder irgendjemand anderes, für den Sie arbeiten. Wenn Sie so handeln, machen Sie es richtig. Das hier ist mein Lieblingsplakat. Im Grunde genommen bin ich ein fremdartiges Wesen. Ich wurde von einem anderen Planeten mit einer Botschaft des guten Willens von meinem Volk gesandt. Die Botschaft lautet: "Liebe Erdbewohner, wenn Ihr schließlich Euren Planeten zerstört habt, könnt Ihr zu uns kommen und bei uns leben und wir werden Euch beibringen, wie man in Frieden und Harmonie lebt. Und wir geben Euch einen 10%-Rabatt-Gutschein auf alle delikaten Pizzen. Mit freundlichen Grüßen Bob." Drei Dinge: Die Zerstörung des Planeten, wir haben gehört, dass wir Probleme bekommen werden. Frieden und Harmonie, ich bin davon überzeugt. Ist es nicht unglaublich, dass unsere Politiker die Probleme nicht lösen können, ohne so junge Menschen wie Sie in die Welt hinaus zu schicken, damit sie einander töten? Wir müssen das Problem lösen. Das ist das Wichtigste. Aber es steckt auch Humor in der Pizza. Ohne die Pizza könnte ich, glaube ich, nicht weiterleben. Leonard Cohen sagte einmal im Magazin Rolling Stone: "Ich betrachte mich nicht als Pessimist. Ein Pessimist ist jemand, der darauf wartet, dass es regnet. Und ich fühle mich durchnässt bis auf die Haut." Ich bin Optimist. Ich werde weg sein, wenn die Kacke am Dampfen ist. Wissenschaft gibt nur Aufschluss darüber, wie man zu denken hat. Alles andere verengt, was man zu denken hat. Denken Sie darüber nach. Wenn Sie daran interessiert sind, setzen Sie sich mit mir in Verbindung. Vielen Dank.

Harold Kroto on the importance of educating childern
(00:27:53 - 00:28:20)

 

Sir Harold Kroto (2012) - Science - Lost in Translation?

Ok, it's a pleasure to be back at Lindau yet again and talk to you. It's a great place and I enjoy coming. It's going to be science lost in translation. But first is: How did I get here? In fact, I was once as young and many of us were as young as some of you are, originally. And I thought I'd show you what happened at school because that's the start of it. Really I didn't want to be a scientist. What I really wanted to be was Superman. And as all scientists know you need evidence and here is the evidence for this. Flying was difficult so I did other things like play tennis and gymnastics. And I acted in a play, Henry V, at school and I thought I'd show you these 2 guys. I'm the handsome guy on the right here just in case you didn't know. And I tell young people like you: You know, don't become an actor because the guy in front, actually be a scientist, not an actor because he is now 5,000 years old and I'm a lot younger than he is. Alright, Ian and I were in the same year at school. Fantastic actor and he came out to stay with us at Tallahassee a couple of year ago. So those are the sorts of things and also perhaps more important than science for me is art and graphics. And I did a lot of drawing and at university did posters and things of this nature, designed the cover of the university magazine. I think it's very important to actually open up those facets of your creative ability. And in fact my first award was not for science, it was for this design and it got into a national newspaper and I used to look like this. Now, I'm old and decrepit now and you're going to look, you're beautiful and young now and you'll look like me one day so I get my own back. So, painting and doing these... I'm not quite sure what that is so I'll gloss over that. Basically those are the sorts of things and this is Margaret, my wife, who is in the audience. And I now do logos and this is my favourite for the Australians here. Yeah, hopefully you'll be better at soccer than the English, rather than cricket, as we know. And I always like ideas. And in fact I designed this Darwin T-shirt and Prishant where are you, are you anywhere around, there you go, there's my T-shirt actually. It's a secret society, you see, it's Darwin's phylogenetic tree. Ok, it's my former co-worker. This is my latest bumper sticker, which I think very importantly. And, oh, I redesigned the Japanese flag, so hopefully that's good. The other thing, in the '60s you had to play a guitar or you wouldn't get to parties, so I had to do that as well. But I think more than anything else what made me a chemist was photography. And I thought I'd show you what it was like to take a photograph. I think Doug Osheroff knows something about that of course because he has the biggest camera on the campus. So you really had to have an incentive to do that. And I did have one and she's in the audience over there. But today all you need to do is that, ok. And you've lost so much. And it epitomises technology that is so inscrutable and that today it's so hard to know what's going on. I also had Meccano and in fact I thought I'd show you an advert from those days. It was basically this one: Meccano boys, and of course today you've got to add the girls in there, are keen, ambitious, inventive. No boy or girl who follows the Meccano hobby can be a bad boy or bad girl. But here it is, we used our hands and made things. And this epitomises what science is. It's not about running around and enjoying things; it's being totally absorbed in things. And I used to make things with nuts and bolts and now it's with electrons and atoms. So basically there's not a lot of difference. And with my youngest son who is a cartoonist we just produced a book in Japan for children. The other thing that was important for me was architecture. I was fascinated by this. In some ways I think I might have ended up one. And I drew this drawing of the town hall in Stockholm where the Nobel Prize is awarded long before I knew what the Nobel Prize was because I was fascinated by the building and by Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright's image. There is some interesting architecture at Sussex where I was for 37 years and I played around with these things. But the architecture that was most important really was this, Buckminster Fuller's dome which was at expo which we visited. And it was rather crucial in deciding what the structure of C60 was. So there it is. You'd never know when your other ideas might be important. And I think that's an issue I think today. Ok, so now let's go to basically science lost in translation. And I'm dedicating this to Giordano Bruno. How many of you know about Giordano Bruno? If you don't, find out because he's... I'm not a big man for saints but if there is a saint this is the saint of science. Basically I'm not here to make you feel comfortable. I'm here to make you think. And in fact the issue, when I give this lecture I usually quote this one from Don Marquis: "If you make people think, they're thinking they love you. But if you really make them think they hate you." Now, it may be the case that you will hate me at the end of this lecture. But at least I'll have made you think. So there you go. I want to start with one of my all time favourite people. It's the Australian scientist John Cornforth who has been deaf since the age of 18. And he wrote a fantastic article which you must all read, its "Scientists are Citizens". It's on my Vega website. Scientists do not believe, they check. I'm not asking you to believe anything I say on the scientific matter and I would say on any matter. Only that there is tested evidence for all of it. I know the nature of that evidence and I can make a judgement of its worth." It's a powerful statement. In the interesting book by Richard Feynman in "The Meaning of it All", I love this book very much, he says: And I do not want to forget the importance of that struggle and by default let it fall away. If you know that you are unsure you have a chance to change the situation." And I love this line: That's for you. Well, what do I think? There are 3 senses. Common sense, common sense is interesting because it tells us that the sun goes around the earth. Who agrees with me? I should bloody well hope so. It starts over here and ends over there. Common sense tells us the sun goes around the earth. How many agree with me now, yes. It's uncommon sense which tells us that the earth is turning on its axis and makes it seem like that. It's the uncommon sense and bravery of Copernicus, Galileo and Giordano Bruno. And if you want watch on the internet and you can see Giordano Bruno's film by Carlo Ponte. You will never forget it because these people fought for you to have the freedom to doubt. Now, most people have accepted the claim that the earth goes around the sun. How many accept that? Almost all of you. Ok, who knows the evidence? Not too many, more than usual because there are a few physicists around. Not many of them know the evidence either. But what else, and this is the important thing, what else have you accepted without knowing the evidence? Ok, many people, in fact probably the majority, maybe 90, 95% of people accept claims for which there is no evidence whatsoever. Think about it. The Royal Society has a crest, "Nullius in verba", which means: Take nobody's word for it, don't take my word for it or my colleagues, just because they're Nobel Prize winners. Listen to what they say but assess it; think of it as a scientist. The problem is that nonsense is common now. And I'm going to give you one beautiful example of creativity at the Kentucky Fried Creation Museum in Cincinnati. Did humans live with dinosaurs? Well, if they did, we obviously put saddles on them and must have ridden them, ok. What did they originally eat? You don't need those teeth to eat a lettuce. What happened to the dinosaurs that didn't go in Noah's Ark? I have met teachers in Florida, science teachers, who claim this. Think about it. There's Noah's Ark and Noah is there and he's Scottish. Any Scots around? You didn't know that, he's got a Scottish accent. There's a big flood coming and we've got to build a big boat. So that's the problem. In my lifetime we've discovered something beautiful and fantastic. And look at the humanity in the face of it. It's obviously an Italian football supporter last week. Mind you it was an English football supporter the week before. But there you go. And this I love; 70% of our genes the same as a pumpkin. And you only have to look at the average politician to actually see the evidence for that. There's more evidence for evolution than any other truth we have discovered. And the attack on evolution is not just an attack on Darwin. It's an attack on the whole of the sciences because the evidence comes from all of these places. And we've got to fight it and shove it down the throats of some very stupid people, including some people who want to be president of the United States. No one has described science better than the great American writer Walt Whitman. That's the great writer, the great line, the double take. The willingness to surrender ideas when the evidence is against him. This is ultimately fine. It keeps the way beyond open. Whitman has drawn an important... Attention, something very important here. All the constructs, all of them, are locked forever, maybe 1,000's of years, in unshakable dogmatic opinion, intrinsically impervious to rational criticism. You haven't got any way of attacking it. Even some sciences who should know better do not appreciate this. That is obvious in what they write. The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth persistent, persuasive and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought." You may be surprised who said it. It was Kennedy; it's a great line. Look around. Well what about Feynman again, the greatest communicator that I've ever seen. If you're interested in the ultimate character of the physical world, the complete world, and at the present time our only way to understand that is through a mathematical type of reasoning, then I don't think a person can fully appreciate or in fact can appreciate much of these particular aspects of the world, the great depth and character of the universality of the laws, the relationships of things, without an understanding of mathematics. I think it's just... I don't know any other way to do it. We don't know any other way to describe it accurately and well or to see the interrelationships without it. So I don't think a person who hasn't developed some mathematical sense is capable of fully appreciating this aspect of the world. Don't misunderstand me, there are many, many aspects of the world that mathematics is unnecessary for such as love. And which are very delightful and wonderful to appreciate and to feel awed and mysterious about. And I don't mean to say that the only thing in the world is physics but you were talking about physics and if that's what you're talking about then to not know mathematics is a severe limitation in understanding the world. That's from a fantastic film made by a friend of mine, Chris Sykes. If you get a chance to see it, watch it, amazing piece of sort of science but television. Well, let's go and think about mathematics. It certainly goes back to the Indians. But also Al-Karismi in about the 8th century, 7th or 8th century, wrote this book. And he formulated the rules of algebra but they were in words, ok. It was all in prose, no equations, ok. Diophantus in the second century certainly had equations and here are some... the way in which it was written and you can disentangle that. So it goes back a long time. But the first book in English was written by Robert Recorde. And it's very interesting because in this book, the first book, he invented the equal sign. And in fact in this book it tells you how to do subtraction. So, that was about 1550. So it goes certainly to do that. Now there are some people who actually appreciate mathematics and I thought... And here we have them. And in fact there's something missing there. That is wonderful because here we see young people who are prepared to see something beautiful in science and mathematics itself. I'll gloss over that. That was LSD just in case you want to synthesise it. But look at this, Nicole a physics graduate student, she says: I consider it the most beautiful thing I have ever learned." Look at, listen to that. And believe it or not. And I was actually able to get the full, well not the full because it goes on to infinity, it would have been tricky to, to photograph the whole of it. But anyway here is Nicole, wonderful student who was here at Lindau in 2010. Ok, so now let's think about science and how old is it? It's not actually very old. Abaelard in the 12th century said basically: And this is a very profound statement, really about science. Of course doubt and questioning are intrinsic dangers to those who believe in dogma and use that for their authority. And Abaelard is somebody who got into hot water and more. Francis Bacon in this book, which was interestingly titled "Novum Oganum", new instrument, actually laid down the foundations of scientific method basically. Determining what is intrinsically true, if that's important to you, it's not important to everybody, certainly not some people who shall be nameless. Observation, hypothesis, supporting evidence and physical law. If we invert Abaelard's statement, we arrive at the most profound axiom of all time: To determine truth we must doubt and enquire, we must not accept. This has explosive consequences. The new instrument intrinsically undermines the assumptions and claims that it had been held sway heretofore for 1,000 years, that fundamental truth was to be found in the Holy Scriptures. Those who followed this axiom found themselves in conflict with dogma based authority and many were executed, Giordano Bruno for one. And that's why I need to dedicate this to him. We owe it to him for the freedoms that we have today to question and doubt. And if you look around, the one place, the one place or those places where basically natural philosophy has really undermined dogma, there you have democracy and science. That's an interesting observation. But who was the first physicist? Well here's another quotation, I love them very much and this one particularly: Anyway I love this quotation very much that I decided to go to Google to find out who actually said it. And when I got there and put it in I actually discovered it was me. But if you change it slightly to "know the answers", then you discover it's Kung Fu. Great, alright there we go. So probably Confucianism and Taoism. So it is a question of what physics is. However, what we need to know is who wrote the first equation of physics. Well let's look at the simplest, Hooke's law, lectures on spring, Hooke's wrote, that is in words: That is if one power stretch it or bend it one space, 2 will bend it 2 and so forth. Now the theory is very short so the way of trying is very easy." So, basically it tells this and basically if you put something else on there, we put that on there and it goes down, ok. Hooke's law, no equations; who did that? That's an interesting point. Christiaan Huygens is supposed to have done it but I haven't actually found it. He knew something about momentum transfer but I still have to confirm that he wrote the first equations. Science started with this guy, ok. And I'm willing to argue it. This is fantastic equipment and just look at the exquisite beauty of this engraving. He used that to measure the orbits of the planets. But it was Kepler who got hold of those data and in this book... He actually had to develop his own logarithms to do the calculations. He showed that the orbit of Mars was an ellipse with the sun at one focus. That was the moment at which science began. And that is in the Rudolphine Tables. Newton came along and explained it. A key guy that I never heard of is Willem 's Gravesande, in this book he writes (reading in French): Mr Leibnitz was the first to suggest that the force (kinetic energy) of the moving body is not proportional to the velocity, according to ordinary view, but to the square; so if the velocity is doubled the force (kinetic energy) is quadrupled. Typical Englishman trying to speak French, but there you go. But it was Leibniz who showed that kinetic energy is 1/2 mV^2 and Willem 's Gravesande showed that by dropping balls into soft clay. That was a major point. And it was Émilie du Châtelet who corrected Newton on kinetic energy because he thought it was momentum. Calculus was required as you know and basically what you need to do is to be able to integrate that. And I don't think you can do that in words and what you get then is the beautiful parabolic curve of the harmonic oscillator. Those are required for the sciences. And in fact that's important. Now we move on to an important guy, Einstein. And Einstein as you know developed the theory of relativity. And this was attacked by quite a number of people including Cardinal O'Connell who said: A New York rabbi decided to write a telegram and said do you believe in god, Albert? That's an interesting statement. So who is this Spinoza guy? He lived in Amsterdam. He outlined in precise detail his philosophical views backing them with logical argument which he claimed were irrefutable. The synagogue authorities decided they had no alternative; they had to get rid of him, ok. A great horn was blown, candles were extinguished one by one. A curse was read out: And cursed be he by day. And cursed be he by night. And cursed when he's lying down and when he's rising up and going out and basically coming back in again." None may speak with him with word of mouth nor by writing now show any favour to him. Nor be under one roof, nor come within 4 cubits of him, nor read any document by him." Well you've got to read this guy, right? With that sort of recommendation. But unfortunately it's in Latin, ok. But this is Strathern's book: This suggests that Spinoza's religion of disenchantment could in fact be a pressing description of modern science. A pantheistic universe whose truth we can comprehend only by the use of reason, mathematics and rational experiment." That's what we're doing here. I don't have the Higgs boson under there, but maybe we will do one day. The orderly harmony of what exists. Let's take the numbers 1, 3 and 5 and look at chemistry because I'm a chemist. I know I'm an interloper amongst all you physicists but there you go. The earth orbits the sun; we use classical mechanics. For an electron orbiting a nucleus we use quantum mechanics. But according to quantum mechanics the orientations of a spinning object only have certain orientations, ok? Not all are allowed. And the quantum number j has the values 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. And the orientations are termed by a very simple formula 2j+1.Therefore when j=0, 2j+1=1. When j=1, 2j+1=3 and when j=2, 2j+1=5, ok? Hence 1, 3 and 5. Now then I'm going to double that, double that set and double that set, move this to there and that to there. Double that set, double that set, double that and move this to there and that to there. And what have we got? It explains the whole of chemistry, all of life and all the useful bits of physics if any. Ok, we chemists have to get back at the great champions of the sciences. Of course physics is the overall arching of the sciences. But chemistry is that massive part of physics that pertains to you, the everyday world, to biology and all these things. And it's based on the numbers 1, 3 and 5. That is science, something so elegant and beautiful. And the value to the human race is also important. I want to show you what it was like to have an amputation without an anaesthetic. No IPhones to measure these things; just have a good look at it. Ah yeah, that was what it was like. People died in shock. There can be no more humanitarian contribution to the human race than anaesthetics from chemistry ok. Penicillin, this simple molecule is really a miracle, you don't have to pray. This little girl in 1942 was cured in 3 weeks. She would have died a year earlier. And one of the heroes is this person who is almost unknown. The future bacteria are evolving with an immunity to antibiotics. Think about it, we need you brilliant young people to solve the problems of the future. And there's misplaced credit for these things. This is a very interesting story of a man in Tallahassee where we live 9 months a year. Alan Cross has spent 24 years in a Florida jail for a crime he did not commit, ok. He got out; he said: His faith kept him going. Incredible guy, but science got him out. And who was the person? Alec Jeffrey's from Leicester University developed DNA fingerprinting. Science is a humanitarian construct. And what is it? Well, we've talked a little bit about it and I'm going to come to my analysis of it. There are aspects of science. One is it's a body of knowledge, another one is the application of that knowledge; it's technology. Another one, very important, is that way that scientific knowledge is actually uncovered. But there's something much more important. And really because science is so useful, people have forgotten what that is. They don't understand what it is. Basically politicians have no idea; they think that you only do science because it's useful. Before science was useful it had another name and it was called natural philosophy. And by far the most important aspect is that natural philosophy is the only philosophical construct we have devised to determine truth with any degree of reliability. Now I'm going to define it, I'm going to say: We have a construct. That construct is the construct that determines truth with any degree of reliability and that I'm going to define as natural philosophy. And the ethical purpose of education must involve the teaching of young people how they can decide what they're being told is actually true. I'm sure we must agree on that. If we don't, we've got problems. Thus the teaching of a sceptical, evidence based assessment of all claims without exception is an intellectual integrity issue that all teachers must address. Without evidence anything goes. Think about it, look around and see that that's the fact. Let me go back to this fantastic article by "Kappa" (John W. Cornforth), great Australian guy and close friend. Australians you want to be proud of this guy, he's such a great man. In this article "Scientists as Citizens" he says: There is what I call public truth, the obligation to record what you have done as accurately as you can, never fabricating, never distorting and never suppressing findings unfavourable to your conclusions. Private truth is even more important. As a scientist interacting with your experiments, you receive an education in the implacability of truth. And your own capacity to be deceived by your expectations, your hopes or just your stupidity that is unlike any other experience I know. I know scientists who are able to go through this and just overlook these things. They should know better." I won't go on, there's a lot more there. You can see it on our website. Now my view is that knowledge cannot guarantee good decisions but common sense suggests that wisdom is an unlikely consequence of ignorance. And why... what do we need? Well, we really need education. We can teach young children at the age of 6, 7 and 8 algebra. And I do that with young children all over the world. Ok, in Japan, Santa Barbara, Mexico, Malaysia, by internet to Iceland, across the whole of Australia. And when I show this sometimes in England there are screams of young woman in the background. But it's not me, it's the bloke on the left that they're sort of... he was at Manchester United. Oh, I love this guy; he's the only guy who has found a use for C60 molecule. But this is my favourite image which shows that science can bring people together from totally different races and that's important. In fact the best reason for being a scientist, that it's the only truly international family. And the reason is we're not personal; it's the universe that is our task master. And here you see the group with my 2 colleagues who aren't here, our group in the UK. And here's another group and you see the internationality of the group in Florida State. Prishan is in the audience here from India or was there. Actually Paul Dirac never comes in at all, never mind. But he was, I mean I don't know, I just would like him to come because we do have some problems that he might be able to solve. So, I set up the Vega Science Trust many years ago to make programs for television and we got Max Perutz, we got fantastic programs by Feynman which were given to us from Auckland. And we had pioneered a new concept in TV debate and that's that participants should actually know something. They're on that website. However, something has happened. Something fantastic has happened. How many of you have looked at an encyclopaedia? This week? Yes that's what we were faced. But you have a revolution. I call it basically the "Goo You Wiki World". And it's a fantastic revolution ok. If you want an image, you used to have to go to Encyclopaedia Britannica. That was not too imaginative but if you go to the Google image browser and put all those in, what you will get are pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and pages and you will even get rotating buckeyballs. Now, that's very difficult to get in Encyclopaedia Britannia. It's a triple revolution, a fantastic revolution, a paradigm shift in seeking, finding, accessing information in seconds. You can create your own material, you can be creative, you can add to that knowledge. And Wikipedia I think is one of the greatest things ever invented. Half a million people contributing their knowledge, their passion, what they're interested in for you, altruistically and anonymously. We're creating something a little bit associated, a global cash of your own links, and you can help. It's GYWW 2.0; I call it GEOSET, Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology. We use a capture station. We're using the technology that's going on here. You've got to see it is exactly the same thing; we're doing it as well. But we're enabling you to do it, not just bloody Nobel laureates, you can do it yourself. And we can show you how to do it. And we're doing that with our students. It's the future of broadcasting basically. John Cornforth who is an Australian, he hated Murdock and he sent him a question, he says: John hated him 15 years ago; he's an Australian. He was ashamed that Murdoch was an Australian. And he said: "Did you lose your respect for the truth gradually or did you never have it?" That was Rupert Murdoch, 15 years ago. I'm going to show you what our students are doing. I've got to show you this because they're just fantastic. Hi, my name is Kerry Gilmore and I am a graduate student here at Florida State University. I work for Doctor L. Coogan as an organic chemist. Now, I love organic chemistry because it provides you the opportunity to go through and be an architect, an engineer, builder, because you can go through and you can really look at designing... I'm going to have to cut it off because there are just a few things I want to say. But our students are doing fantastic work. Just google GEOSET, you'll see something on wolves and secret agents and if you want to know what I'm doing here, you'll find it. We've revolutionised the résumé, ok. Basically we've put you on top of the pile. If you want a job, you can get it by working in this way. Assessment, basically instead of that I can do this and I can assess you drinking a glass of wine, ok. Hall of fame, our students are getting jobs and scholarships. Fully a Fulbright, we got a rich media award. Prishan, 4 tenure-track offers, got into medical school, got a job, got a scholarship, got into vet school, got a Gold Water Scholarship, got a job at NHK. This is the important one, Sino in Japan, a postdoc sent her presentation to India and she got a job at the Mahatma Gandhi University. So these are the people that are associated and someone who knows where we are is my wife Margaret over here. I don't have time for this. I've got 2 other things I want to say. The first is about attitude. Basically they tell you that you should enjoy things, it's not quite the same as that. Basically just do things, give it your best shot. Don't do anything second rate. Just don't do it if it's second rate. If second rate doesn't satisfy you, don't do it. Only be satisfied yourself, not the teacher or something else, not whoever you're working for, if you do that you'll really do well. My favourite poster I want to show you this. Basically I'm an alien creature. I was sent from another planet with a message of goodwill from my people. The message says: And we will give you a coupon for 10% off all deep dish pizzas too. Sincerely, Bob." Peace and harmony, I'm sure about this. Isn't it incredible that our politicians can't solve problems without sending young people like you to go and kill each other? We've got to solve that problem, that's the first important one. But there's a sense of humour in pizza. Without the pizza I don't think I could go on living, ok. Leonard Cohan said in Rolling Stone: I think of the pessimist as someone who is waiting for it to rain and I feel soaked to the skin." Me I'm an optimist, I'll be well out of here when the shit hits the fan. Science only tells you how to think, all other constricts what to think. Think about it. If you're interested in this contact me. Thank you very much. Applause.

Ich freue mich, wieder hier in Lindau zu sein und einen Vortrag halten zu dürfen. Das hier ist ein großartiger Ort und ich komme sehr gerne hierher. Mein Thema heißt "Science - Lost in Translation". Aber zunächst mal das: Wie kam ich hierher? Ich war ja auch mal so jung wie Sie. Viele von uns waren einmal so jung wie einige von Ihnen. Deshalb zeige ich Ihnen, was in der Schule passiert ist, denn dort begann alles. Eigentlich wollte ich gar kein Wissenschaftler werden. Ich träumte davon, Superman zu sein. Und wie alle Wissenschaftler wissen, ist die Evidenz entscheidend. Und hier ist sie. Fliegen war schwierig, weshalb ich mich mit anderen Dingen wie Tennisspielen oder Turnen beschäftigte. Und ich spielte in einem Theaterstück, Henry V., in der Schule und möchte Ihnen gerne diese beiden Jungens hier zeigen. Ich bin der hübsche Junge rechts - nur für den Fall, dass Ihnen das nicht aufgefallen ist. Und ich rate jungen Menschen wie Ihnen immer: Werden Sie bloß nicht Schauspieler, weil der Typ da vorne jetzt 5.000 Jahre alt ist und ich bin viel jünger als er. Werden Sie Wissenschaftler, nicht Schauspieler! Nun gut, Ian und ich sind in dieselbe Klasse gegangen. Ein fantastischer Schauspieler. Er hat uns mal vor einigen Jahren in Tallahassee besucht. So ist das also. Vielleicht sind für mich Dinge wie Kunst und Graphik noch wichtiger als die Wissenschaft. Ich habe viele Zeichnungen angefertigt und während des Studiums Plakate und Sachen dieser Art entworfen, beispielsweise auch das Titelblatt des Hochschulmagazins. Ich glaube, dass es sehr wichtig ist, seine kreativen Fähigkeiten auch auf andere Facetten zu erweitern. Meine erste Auszeichnung erhielt ich tatsächlich nicht für eine wissenschaftliche Arbeit, sondern für diesen Entwurf hier. Und das wurde in der nationalen Zeitung veröffentlicht. So sah ich damals aus. Heute bin ich alt und gebrechlich. Und auch Sie, die Sie heute so jung und schön sind, werden irgendwann eines Tages so aussehen wie ich, sodass ich meine Revanche habe. Ja, Malen und solche Dinge... Ich weiß nicht so genau, was hier jetzt kommt und überschlage das mal schnell. Das sind also alles Dinge, die mich auch interessieren und das ist Margaret, meine Frau, die hier im Publikum sitzt. Und heute entwerfe ich auch Logos und das ist mein Favorit für die Australier, die hier vertreten sind. Ich hoffe also, dass Sie bessere Fußballer sind als die Engländer, besser als im Kricket, wie wir wissen. Ich mag es immer wieder, mir neue Dinge einfallen zu lassen. Und tatsächlich habe ich dieses Darwin-T-Shirt entworfen und... Prishant, wo bist du? Bist du da irgendwo? Ja, da. Das ist tatsächlich das von mir entworfene T-Shirt. Das ist ein Geheimbund, das ist Darwins Stammbaum. Okay, das ist mein früherer Kollege. Das hier ist mein neuester Autoaufkleber, den ich für sehr bedeutend halte. Und ich habe die japanische Flagge umgestaltet. Ich hoffe, das gefällt Ihnen. Was man in den 60er Jahren außerdem noch können musste, war Gitarre spielen. Oder man kam auf keine Party. Das habe ich dann also auch gemacht. Aber ich glaube, was mich mehr als alles andere zum Chemiker gemacht hat, war die Fotografie. Ich möchte Ihnen gerne zeigen, was es damals bedeutete zu fotografieren. Ich denke, Doug Osheroff kennt das, weil er doch die größte Kamera auf dem Campus besitzt. Man brauchte natürlich auch einen Anreiz dafür. Den hatte ich natürlich auch. Sie sitzt dort im Publikum. Aber heute braucht man nur noch das hier. Und es ist so viel verloren gegangen. Das steht für eine Technologie, die so unvorhersehbar ist. Deshalb lässt sich heute nur schwer vorhersagen, was geschehen wird. Ich hatte natürlich auch einen Meccano-Metallbaukasten. Ich möchte Ihnen gerne eine Anzeige aus der damaligen Zeit zeigen. Das ging ungefähr so: "Meccano-Jungs" - und heute würde man natürlich die Mädchen auch einbeziehen - das je mit Meccano gespielt hat, könnte sich wohl zu einem Bad Boy (oder Bad Girl) entwickeln". Aber hier sehen Sie es: Wir haben unsere Hände benutzt und Dinge zusammengebastelt. Und das versinnbildlicht, was Wissenschaft ist. Wissenschaft heißt nicht herumrennen und sich vergnügen. Es bedeutet, sich von etwas völlig absorbieren zu lassen. Ich habe früher Sachen aus Muttern und Bolzen gebaut. Und heute sind es Elektronen und Atome. Grundsätzlich besteht da also kein so großer Unterschied. Und mit meinem jüngsten Sohn, einem Karikaturisten, habe ich vor Kurzem gemeinsam in Japan ein Buch für Kinder produziert. Eine andere wichtige Sache war für mich immer die Architektur. Das hat mich fasziniert. Irgendwie hätte ich auch dort enden können. Diese Zeichnung, die ich vom Rathaus in Stockholm angefertigt habe, wo ja der Nobelpreis überreicht wird, ist lange vor der Zeit entstanden, in der ich überhaupt wusste, was der Nobelpreis ist. Ich war so fasziniert von dem Gebäude und auch von Le Corbusier und dem Bild von Frank LloydWright. In Sussex, wo ich 37 Jahre gelebt habe, gibt es interessante Architektur zu sehen. Ich habe mit solchen Motiven gespielt. Aber die Architektur, die wirklich am Bedeutendsten war, war diese: der Buckminster-Fuller-Dom bei der Expo, den wir besuchten. Und das war wirklich entscheidend für die Aufklärung der Struktur von C60. Hier ist das zu sehen. Man kann auch nie wissen, wann die eigenen Ideen vielleicht Bedeutung erhalten. Und das ist, glaube ich, heutzutage ein wichtiges Thema. Gut, ich komme jetzt zum eigentlichen Thema "Science - Lost in Translation". Und ich widme das Giordano Bruno. Wer von Ihnen kennt Giordano Bruno? Falls nicht, beschäftigen Sie sich einmal mit ihm ...weil er...ich halte nicht viel von Heiligen, aber wenn es einen Heiligen gibt, dann ist er der Heilige der Wissenschaft. Ich bin im Grunde genommen nicht hier, damit Sie sich wohlfühlen, sondern ich bin hier, um Sie zum Denken anzuregen. Wenn ich diesen Vortrag halte, zitiere ich meistens diesen Spruch von Don Marquis: Wenn Du sie wirklich zum Denken bringst, werden sie Dich hassen." Vielleicht hassen Sie mich ja am Ende dieses Vortrages, aber zumindest habe ich Sie zum Denken gebracht. Na also. Ich möchte mit meinem absoluten Liebling beginnen. Es ist der australische Wissenschaftler John Cornforth, der seit seinem 18. Lebensjahr taub ist. Und er hat einen fantastischen Aufsatz geschrieben, den Sie alle lesen sollten, nämlich "Scientists as Citizens" (Wissenschaftler sind Bürger. Sie finden das auf meiner Vega-Website. dass ein auf Zweifeln basierendes Wissenssystem die treibende Kraft für die Entwicklung der modernen Zivilisation sein konnte. Wissenschaftler glauben nicht, sondern sie überprüfen. Ich bitte Sie nicht darum, irgendetwas von dem zu glauben, was ich über wissenschaftliche - und ich würde sagen über alle - Fragen zu sagen habe. Es sollte für alles ein Nachweis erbracht werden. Ich kenne die Beschaffenheit eines solchen Nachweises und kann seinen Wert beurteilen." Das ist eine kraftvolle Aussage. Richard Feynman sagt in seinem Buch "The Meaning of it All" - ich mag dieses Buch sehr - das Folgende: Sie ist entstanden aus einem Kampf. Es war der Kampf darum, zweifeln zu dürfen, um sicher sein zu dürfen. Und ich möchte die Bedeutung dieses Kampfes nie vergessen und ich möchte darin auch nie nachlassen. Wenn man weiß, dass man unsicher ist, hat man die Möglichkeit, die Situation zu verändern." Und ich liebe auch diese Zeile: Den gesunden Menschenverstand (Common Sense). Der ist interessant, weil er uns sagt, dass sich die Sonne um die Erde dreht. Wer stimmt mir zu? Das bleibt verdammt noch mal zu hoffen. Sie startet hier und endet dort. Der gesunde Menschenverstand sagt uns, dass sich die Sonne um die Erde bewegt. Wer stimmt mir jetzt immer noch zu? Ja. Der außerordentliche Verstand (Uncommon Sense) sagt uns, dass sich die Erde um ihre eigene Achse dreht und dass es so erscheint wie hier. Das ist der außerordentliche Verstand und Mut von Menschen wie Copernicus, Galileo und Giordano Bruno. Schauen Sie sich das doch im Internet an und sehen Sie sich den Kinofilm von Carlo Ponte über Giordano Bruno an. Sie werden das nie vergessen, weil diese Menschen dafür gekämpft haben, dass Sie heute die Freiheit des Zweifels leben können. Inzwischen haben die meisten Menschen die Behauptung akzeptiert, dass sich die Erde um die Sonne bewegt. Wie viele akzeptieren das? Fast alle. Und wer kennt den Beweis? Nicht so viele, mehr als gewöhnlich, weil hier doch einige Physiker vertreten sind. Aber auch viele von denen kennen den Beweis dafür nicht. Aber was - und darum geht es hier - was haben Sie noch alles akzeptiert, ohne den Nachweis dafür zu kennen? Viele Menschen, wahrscheinlich der Großteil, schätzungsweise 90%, 95% akzeptieren Aussagen, für die sie überhaupt keinen Nachweis haben. Denken Sie darüber nach. Die Royal Society hat das Motto "Nullius in verba", was soviel bedeutet wie: "Nach Niemandes Worten". Glauben Sie niemandem, auch mir nicht oder meinen Kollegen, bloß weil sie Nobelpreisträger sind. Hören Sie zu, was sie zu sagen haben, aber bewerten Sie das auch. Denken Sie darüber als Wissenschaftler nach. Das Problem ist, dass heute der Nonsens verbreitet ist. Und ich möchte Ihnen ein wunderbares Beispiel für die Kreativität des Kentucky Fried Creation Museum in Cincinnati geben. Das hat 27 Millionen Dollar gekostet. Busladungen von Kindern werden dahin gekarrt und andere Gruppen ebenfalls. Deshalb lebten Dinosaurier und Menschen zur gleichen Zeit." Wenn das wirklich der Fall war, haben wir die Dinosaurier wahrscheinlich auch gesattelt und sind darauf herum geritten. Und "Was haben Dinosaurier ursprünglich gefressen?" "Bevor Adam gesündigt hat, waren alle Tiere - auch die Dinosaurier - Vegetarier." Man braucht nicht solche ein Gebiss, um Salat zu essen. ertranken (vor rund 4350 Jahren) in den Fluten und viele wurden begraben und sind als Fossil erhalten geblieben." Ich habe doch tatsächlich Lehrer in Florida getroffen, Naturkundelehrer, die das behaupten. Denken Sie darüber nach. Das ist die Arche Noah und das ist Noah. Und er ist Schotte. Sind hier Schotten unter uns? Sie haben das wahrscheinlich nicht gewusst, aber er hat einen schottischen Akzent: Im Laufe meines Lebens wurden wunderbare und fantastische Dinge entdeckt. Das ist offensichtlich ein italienischer Fußballfan letzte Woche. Oder ein englischer Fußballfan eine Woche vorher. Na also. 70% Übereinstimmung mit diesem Kerl und 50% mit den Genen einer Fruchtfliege und auch mit den Maden. Und das hier mag ich: 70% unserer Gene entsprechen denen von einem Kürbis. Und man braucht sich doch nur den durchschnittlichen Politiker anzuschauen, um tatsächlich den Nachweis dafür zu erhalten ... Es gibt mehr Beweise für die Evolution als für jede andere Wahrheit, die wir entdeckt haben. Der Angriff auf die Evolution ist nicht nur eine Attacke auf Darwin. Es ist ein Angriff auf die gesamten Wissenschaften, weil die Beweise aus diesen Bereichen kommen. Und wir müssen dagegen angehen und das auch einigen sehr dummen Menschen eintrichtern, auch solchen, die Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten werden wollen. Niemand hat die Wissenschaften besser beschrieben als der großartige amerikanische Autor Walt Whitman. Das ist der großartige Schriftsteller, die großartige Zeile, die doppelte Auslegung. Es hält die Möglichkeiten offen. Whitman hat etwas Wichtiges, wirklich sehr Wichtiges aufgeschrieben. Konstrukte sind allesamt für immer eingesperrt, möglicherweise Tausende von Jahren, in unerschütterlichen dogmatischen Positionen, unempfindlich gegen rationale Kritik. Es gibt keine Möglichkeit des Angriffs. Selbst einige Wissenschaften, die es besser wissen sollten, sehen das nicht ein. Das wird daran deutlich, was sie schreiben. Der große Feind der Wahrheit ist oft nicht die bewusste, erfundene und unehrliche Lüge, sondern der hartnäckige und überzeugende und unrealistische Mythos. Der Glaube an Mythen ermöglicht die Bequemlichkeit einer Meinung ohne die Unbequemlichkeit des Denkens." Vielleicht erstaunt Sie, wer das hier gesagt hat. Es war Kennedy. Das war ein großer Satz. Und was sagt Feynman, der begnadetste Kommunikator, den ich je erlebt habe, dazu? Wenn man an dem ultimativen Charakter der physikalischen Welt, der gesamten Welt interessiert ist - und in der gegenwärtigen Zeit besteht unsere einzige Möglichkeit, sie zu verstehen, in einer Form von mathematischen Überlegungen - kann man, so meine ich, all diese speziellen Aspekte der Welt, die großartige Tiefe und die Merkmale der Universalität der Gesetze, der Beziehungen der Dinge untereinander nicht voll und ganz ohne ein mathematisches Grundverständnis erfassen. Ich glaube bzw. kenne keinen anderen Weg. Wir kennen keine andere Möglichkeit, das ohne diese Grundlage exakt und gut zu beschreiben oder die Wirkzusammenhänge zu sehen. Deshalb wird jemand, glaube ich, der nicht ein wenig mathematisches Gespür entwickelt hat, nicht in der Lage sein, diese Aspekte der Welt in vollem Umfang zu erfassen. Missverstehen Sie mich bitte nicht. Es gibt viele, viele Aspekte der Welt, für die man keine Mathematik benötigt, etwa für die Liebe, die man mit voller Bewunderung und Ergötzlichkeit schätzen kann und die einem Ehrfurcht einflößen und geheimnisvoll erscheinen kann. Und ich will auch gar nicht behaupten, dass die Physik das Einzige in der Welt ist. Aber Sie haben über die Physik gesprochen und wenn man darüber spricht, ist die Tatsache, nichts über Mathematik zu wissen, eine große Einschränkung für das Weltverständnis. Das ist ein Zitat aus einem phantastischen Film, den einer meiner Freunde, Chris Sykes, gedreht hat. Wenn Sie die Möglichkeit haben, schauen Sie sich diesen Film an. Das ist wirklich ein Stück Wissenschaft im Film. Lassen Sie uns also über Mathematik nachdenken. Die geht mit Sicherheit auf die Indianer zurück. Aber auch Al-Khwarizmi hat im 8. Jahrhundert, im 7. oder 8. Jahrhundert, dieses Buch geschrieben. Und er hat die Regeln der Algebra formuliert, aber in Form von Worten, in Prosa, nicht in Form von Gleichungen. Diophantus schrieb im zweiten Jahrhundert tatsächlich Gleichungen auf. Hier sind einige ... hier sehen Sie die Art, in der sie aufgeschrieben wurden. Und die kann man lösen. Das reicht also wirklich weit zurück. Aber das erste Buch in englischer Sprache wurde von Robert Recorde geschrieben. Und das ist interessant, weil er in seinem ersten Buch das Gleichheitszeichen erfand. Und in diesem Buch wird auch erklärt, wie man subtrahiert. Das war so um 1550 herum. Es geht also mit Sicherheit so weit zurück. Und es soll Menschen geben, die die Mathematik tatsächlich lieben und ich dachte ... Hier sind sie. Und hier an dieser Stelle fehlt tatsächlich etwas [in der Formel]. Das ist wunderbar, weil wir hier junge Menschen erleben, die bereit sind, etwas Wunderbares in der Wissenschaft und der Mathematik zu entdecken. Ich überschlage das mal. Das war gerade LSD, nur für den Fall, dass Sie das synthetisch herstellen möchten. Aber schauen Sie sich das hier an, Nicole, eine Doktorandin der Physik. Sie sagt: "Mein Tattoo ist die Sinusexpansion von Taylor. Für mich ist das das schönste, was ich jemals gelernt habe." Hören Sie sich das an. Und glauben Sie das oder auch nicht. Wir waren vor zwei Jahren im Garten vor der Inselhalle. Und dort spazierte mein Lieblingstattoo vorbei. Diese Nicole aus Stanford war tatsächlich vor zwei Jahren hier. Und ich war tatsächlich in der Lage, das Gesamtbild zu fotografieren, nein nicht alles, weil das ja in der Unendlichkeit verschwindet. Das wäre doch sehr durchtrieben gewesen, das Ganze zu fotografieren. Aber egal. Das hier ist Nicole, eine wunderbare Studentin, die 2010 in Lindau war. Lassen Sie uns jetzt also über die Wissenschaft nachdenken und wie alt sie ist. Sie ist nicht wirklich sehr alt. Abaelard hat im 12. Jahrhundert so ungefähr das Folgende gesagt: "Indem wir nämlich zweifeln, gelangen wir zur Untersuchung und durch diese erfassen wir die Wahrheit." Und das ist eine sehr grundlegende Aussage über die Wissenschaft. Denn Zweifel und Hinterfragungen sind die eigentliche Bedrohung für Menschen, die an Dogmen glauben und diese für ihre Autoritätsposition nutzen. Und Abaelard zählt zu denjenigen, die wirklich in Teufelsküche usw. gekommen sind. In seinem interessanterweise als "Novum Organum" (Neues Instrument) betitelten Buch beschrieb Francis Bacon die Grundlagen wissenschaftlicher Methodik. Herausfinden, was an sich wahr ist. Wenn es für einen selbst Bedeutung hat, muss das nicht für alle anderen auch gelten, bestimmt nicht für Leute, die ich hier nicht zu nennen brauche. Beobachtung, Hypothese, unterstützende Nachweise und physikalisches Gesetz. Wenn wir Abaelards Aussage umkehren, kommen wir zum tiefgründigsten Axiom aller Zeiten: Wenn wir die Wahrheit finden wollen, müssen wir zweifeln und untersuchen und dürfen nichts akzeptieren. Das hat enorme Folgen. Das neue Instrument untergräbt die Annahmen und Behauptungen, die zuvor mehr als 1.000 Jahre lang dominiert hatten, dass nämlich die fundamentale Wahrheit in der Heiligen Schrift zu finden sei. Und viele, die diesem Axiom folgten, befanden sich in heftigen Konflikten mit der dogmagestützten Autorität. Viele von ihnen wurden ermordet, so auch Giordano Bruno. Und deshalb ist es mir ein Anliegen, ihm diesen Vortrag hier zu widmen. Wir sind es ihm schuldig für die Freiheiten, die wir heute haben, alles zu hinterfragen und anzuzweifeln. Und wenn man sich anschaut, dann herrscht genau an den Orten, wo die Naturphilosophie das Dogma grundlegend unterhöhlt hat, Demokratie und Wissenschaft. Das ist eine interessante Beobachtung. Aber wer war eigentlich der erste Physiker? Hier kommt ein weiteres Zitat. Ich mag Zitate und dieses ganz besonders: "Ich suche nicht die Antwort, sondern will die Frage verstehen." Was ist Physik? Übrigens mag ich dieses Zitat wirklich sehr und habe deshalb mal bei Google versucht herauszufinden, wer das tatsächlich gesagt hat. Und dort entdeckte ich, dass ich es war. Wenn man das aber dann etwas verändert in "die Antwort herauszufinden", entdeckt man, dass es Kung Fu war. Großartig, machen wir weiter. Also wahrscheinlich Konfuzianismus und Taoismus. Es stellt sich also die Frage, was Physik ist. Was wir aber eigentlich wissen müssen, ist, wer die erste Gleichung in der Physik aufgeschrieben hat. Schauen wir doch zunächst auf das Einfachste, das Hookesche Gesetz, Vorlesungen zur Feder. Hooke hat das so beschrieben: "Die Kraft einer Feder ist proportional zu ihrer Spannung. Das heißt: Bei einer Energieeinheit wird die Feder um eine Raumeinheit gedehnt oder verformt, bei zwei Energieeinheiten um zwei usw. Die Theorie ist also sehr kurz und die Möglichkeit, das auszuprobieren, sehr einfach." Also das ist die grundlegende Botschaft. Wenn man dort etwas hinzugibt, wirkt es sich an dieser Stelle aus. Okay. Das Hookesche Gesetz, keine Gleichung. Wer war es dann? Das ist eine interessante Frage. Christiaan Huygens soll es gewesen sein, aber ich habe dazu eigentlich nichts gefunden. Er wusste etwas über Impulsüberträge. Aber ich muss erst noch die Bestätigung dafür finden, dass er auch tatsächlich die ersten Gleichungen aufgeschrieben hat. Die Wissenschaft begann mit diesem Typen hier. Okay. Ich bin bereit, das zu begründen. Das ist ein fantastisches Gerät. Und schauen Sie sich nur die außergewöhnliche Schönheit dieser Gravur an. Er hat das verwendet, um die Bahnen der Planeten zu messen. Aber es war Kepler, der diese Daten in die Hände bekam und in diesem Buch ... Er musste tatsächlich seine eigenen Logarithmen entwickeln, um die Berechnungen anzustellen. Er wies nach, dass die Bahn des Mars eine Ellipse ist und die Sonne in einem Fokus liegt. Das war der Moment, an dem die Wissenschaft begann. Und das ist in den Tabulae Rudolphine festgehalten. Dann kam Newton und erklärte das. Ein entscheidender Mann, von dem ich nie gehört hatte, ist Willem 's Gravesande, der in seinem Buch schreibt (liest Französisch): "Herr Leibnitz war der erste, der darauf hinwies, dass die Kraft (kinetische Energie) eines sich bewegenden Körpers nicht proportional zur Geschwindigkeit ist, wie es der üblichen Auffassung entspricht, sondern proportional zum Quadrat dieses Wertes, sodass die Geschwindigkeit sich verdoppelt, wenn sich die Kraft (kinetische Energie) vervierfacht." Typisch Engländer, der versucht Französisch zu sprechen. Aber dabei bleibt es dann auch. Es war also Leibniz, der nachwies, dass die kinetische Energie 1/2 mV^2 ist. Und es war Willem 's Gravesande, der das durch Fallenlassen von Bällen in Weichkaolin nachweisen konnte. Das war ein wichtiger Punkt. Und es war Émilie du Châtelet, die Newton bezüglich der kinetischen Energie korrigierte, denn er hatte das für einen Impuls gehalten. Kalkül war erforderlich, wie Sie wissen. Und es geht grundsätzlich um die Fähigkeit, das zu integrieren. Und das ist meiner Meinung nach nicht mit Worten möglich. Was man dann als Ergebnis erhält, ist die wunderschöne Parabolkurve des harmonischen Quantenoszillators. Das braucht man für die Wissenschaften. Und das ist wirklich wichtig. Jetzt kommen wir zu einem bedeutenden Menschen, nämlich Einstein. Und Einstein hat, wie Sie wissen, die Relativitätstheorie entwickelt. Und die wurde von einigen Menschen angegriffen, unter anderem von Cardinal O'Connell, der sagte: die einen grundlegenden Zweifel an Gott und seiner Schöpfung verbreitet haben." Ein New Yorker Rabbiner schickte Einstein ein Telegramm mit der Frage "Glauben Sie an Gott, Albert?" der sich mit Schicksalen und Handlungen der Menschen abgibt." Das ist eine interessante Aussage. Wer war eigentlich dieser Spinoza? Er lebte in Amsterdam. Er skizzierte in präziser Detailtreue seine philosophischen Einsichten und untermauerte sie mit logischen Argumenten, die ihm zufolge unwiderlegbar waren. Die Obrigkeiten der Synagoge sahen keine andere Alternative, als ihn aus ihrer Gemeinschaft auszuschließen. Ein bombastisches Horn wurde geblasen. Die Kerzen wurden nach und nach gelöscht und ein Fluch wurde vorgelesen: Verflucht sei er Tag für Tag. Und verflucht sei er Nacht für Nacht. Und verflucht sei er, wenn er sich niederlegt und wenn er aufsteht. Wenn er ausgeht und auch, wenn er wieder zurückkehrt." Niemand darf mehr auch nur ein Wort zu ihm sprechen oder schreiben oder ihm Gnade erweisen, mit ihm unter einem Dach leben oder sich ihm auf weniger als vier Ellenlängen nähern oder etwas lesen, was er geschrieben hat." Sie sollten unbedingt Texte von diesem Menschen lesen, der sich auf diese Art und Weise empfohlen hat. Aber leider ist alles in Lateinisch. Aber dann gibt es auch noch das Buch von Strathern: "Ein universeller Gott, der nur durch Anwendung von Vernunft auf die Welt um uns herum richtig verstanden werden kann. Das lässt vermuten, dass Spinozas Religion der Ernüchterung tatsächlich eine überzeugende Beschreibung der modernen Wissenschaft sein könnte. Ein pantheistisches Universum, dessen Wahrheit wir nur durch Gebrauch von Vernunft, Mathematik und rationalem Experiment verstehen können." Und das machen wir hier. Wir haben das Higgs-Boson hier nicht dabei, aber vielleicht ist auch das irgendwann der Fall. Die ordentliche Harmonie dessen, was existiert. Lassen Sie uns die Zahlen 1, 3 und 5 nehmen und die Chemie anschauen, weil ich Chemiker bin. Ich weiß, dass ich unter all den Physikern unter Ihnen ein Eindringling bin, aber hier bin ich nun mal. Die Erde dreht sich um die Sonne. Wir arbeiten mit der klassischen Mechanik. Für ein Elektron, das um einen Kern kreist, arbeiten wir mit der Quantenmechanik. Aber laut Quantenmechanik kann ein sich drehendes Objekt nur bestimmte Ausrichtungen aufweisen. Richtig? Es sind nicht alle Ausrichtungen zulässig. Und die Quantenzahl j hat die Werte 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. Und die Ausrichtungen werden durch eine sehr einfache Formel, nämlich 2j+1, angegeben. Wenn also j=0, dann ist 2j+1=1. Wenn j=1, dann ist 2j+1=3 und wenn j=2, dann ist 2j+1=5, richtig? Also 1, 3 und 5. Und wenn ich jetzt hingehe und das verdopple, also diese Reihe und diese Reihe verdopple, das dorthin bewege und das dorthin, diese Reihe verdopple und diese Reihe verdopple, das hier verdopple und das hier verdopple und das hier bewege und das so: Was ist dann das Ergebnis? Damit ist die gesamte Chemie erklärt, das gesamte Leben und das gesamte sinnvolle bisschen Physik, wenn es das überhaupt gibt. Okay, wir Chemiker müssen es den großartigen Meistern der Wissenschaften heimzahlen. Natürlich ist die Physik der alles überspannende Bogen der Wissenschaften. Aber Chemie repräsentiert diesen enormen Teil der Physik, der uns betrifft, also die Alltagswelt, die Biologie und all diese Dinge. Und das basiert auf den Zahlen 1, 3 und 5. Das ist Wissenschaft, etwas so Elegantes und Schönes. Und der Wert für die Menschheit ist enorm wichtig. Ich möchte Ihnen zeigen, wie es war, als wir Amputationen ohne Anästhesie durchführen mussten. Da helfen auch keine iPhones weiter. Schauen Sie sich das gut an. Ja, genauso sah es aus. Die Menschen starben im Schock. Es kann kaum einen humaneren Beitrag für die Menschheit geben als die aus der Chemie stammende Anästhesie. Penicillin, dieses simple Molekül, ist wirklich ein Wunder. Man muss nicht beten. Dieses kleine Mädchen wurde 1942 innerhalb von drei Wochen geheilt. Ein Jahr früher wäre es noch gestorben. Und einer der Helden ist diese kaum bekannte Person. Künftige Bakterien werden unempfindlich gegenüber Antibiotika sein. Denken Sie darüber nach. Wir brauchen so brillante junge Menschen wie Sie, damit wir die Probleme der Zukunft lösen können. Manchmal werden auch nicht die Richtigen gewürdigt. Es gibt die interessante Geschichte eines Mannes aus Tallahassee, wo wir neun Monate des Jahres verbringen. Alan Cross saß 24 Jahre in einem Gefängnis in Florida für ein Verbrechen ein, das er nicht begangen hat. Bei seiner Entlassung aus dem Gefängnis sagte er: "Dieser Zeitpunkt hat lange auf sich warten lassen. Ich danke Gott für diesen Tag." Sein Vertrauen ließ ihn durchhalten. Unglaublicher Mensch. Aber die Wissenschaft hat ihn aus dem Gefängnis geholt. Und wer war der Erfinder? Alec Jeffrey, ein Freund von mir von der Leicester University, der die DNS-Spurenidentifikationsmethode entwickelte. Die Wissenschaft ist ein humanitäres Konstrukt. Und was ist das? Wir haben ja ein bisschen darüber erfahren und ich komme jetzt zu meiner Analyse. Die Wissenschaft hat verschiedene Aspekte. Einer ist das Wissen, ein anderer die Anwendung dieses Wissens, die Technologie. Ein weiterer sehr bedeutender Aspekt ist der Weg, auf dem das wissenschaftliche Wissen tatsächlich entdeckt wird. Aber dann gibt es auch noch etwas viel Wichtigeres. Und weil die Wissenschaft so nützlich ist, haben viele Menschen das vergessen. Sie verstehen nicht, was das ist. Im Grunde genommen haben auch Politiker keine Ahnung davon. Sie denken, dass man Wissenschaft nur deshalb betreibt, weil sie zweckmäßig ist. Aber bevor die Wissenschaft nützlich wurde, hatte sie eine andere Bezeichnung. Sie wurde als Naturphilosophie bezeichnet. Und der bei weitem bedeutendste Aspekt ist, dass die Naturphilosophie das einzige philosophische Konstrukt ist, das wir mit dem Ziel entwickelt haben, die Wahrheit mit einem gewissen Grad der Zuverlässigkeit aufzuklären. Das möchte ich jetzt definieren. Ich sage: Wir haben ein Konstrukt. Das Konstrukt ist das Konstrukt, mit dem die Wahrheit mit einem gewissen Grad der Zuverlässigkeit aufgeklärt wird. Und das definiere ich dann als Naturphilosophie. Und ein ethisches Bildungsziel muss auch darin bestehen, jungen Menschen beizubringen, wie sie feststellen können, ob das, was man ihnen erzählt, tatsächlich wahr ist. Ich bin sicher, dass wir uns darauf einigen müssen. Wenn wir das nicht machen, bekommen wir Probleme. Die Unterrichtung einer skeptischen, evidenzbasierten Beurteilung aller Behauptungen - ausnahmslos - ist eine Frage der intellektuellen Integrität, die alle Lehrer berücksichtigen sollten. Ohne Evidenz ist alles erlaubt, was gefällt. Denken Sie darüber nach. Schauen Sie sich um und finden Sie heraus, dass das Fakt ist. Ich möchte noch einmal auf diesen phantastischen Artikel von "Kappa" (John W. Cornforth), diesen großartigen Australier und guten Freund, zurückkommen. Australier, Ihr könnt wirklich stolz auf diesen Kerl sein. Er ist ein so großartiger Mensch. In seinem Aufsatz "Scientists as Citizens" sagt er: Das ist das, was ich als öffentliche Wahrheit bezeichne, nämlich die Verpflichtung, alles, was man getan hat, so exakt wie möglich zu erfassen und niemals Ergebnisse zu erfinden, zu verdrehen und zu unterdrücken, die ungünstig für die eigenen Schlussfolgerungen sind. Die persönliche Wahrheit ist sogar noch wichtiger. Als Wissenschaftler, der mit Experimenten umgeht, erhalten Sie eine Ausbildung in der Unerbittlichkeit der Wahrheit und Ihrer eigenen Fähigkeit, sich von den eigenen Erwartungen, Hoffnungen oder nur der eigenen Dummheit täuschen zu lassen. Das lässt sich mit keiner anderen Erfahrung vergleichen, die ich kenne. Ich kenne Wissenschaftler, die wirklich darüber hinweg gehen und diese Dinge einfach übersehen. Sie sollten es eigentlich besser wissen." Ich höre hier auf, obwohl es noch viel mehr zu sagen gäbe. Das können Sie alles auf unserer Website nachlesen. Meiner Ansicht nach garantiert Wissen keine guten Entscheidungen. Aber der gesunde Menschenverstand legt nahe, dass Weisheit eine unwahrscheinliche Konsequenz von Ignoranz ist. Und warum ... was brauchen wir? Nun, wir brauchen wirklich Bildung. Wir können Kindern im Alter von 6, 7 und 8 die Algebra beibringen. Und ich mache das mit Kindern in der ganzen Welt, in Japan, Santa Barbara, Mexiko, Malaysia, per Internet in Island und in ganz Australien. Wenn ich das hier in England zeige, gibt es manchmal hysterische Schreie von jungen Frauen. Die gelten aber dann nicht mir, sondern diesem Kerl links. Der ist irgendwie ... er war mal bei Manchester United. Oh, ich mag diesen Kerl wirklich. Er ist der Einzige, der eine Verwendung für das C60-Molekül gefunden hat. Aber das hier ist mein Lieblingsbild, weil es zeigt, dass die Wissenschaft Menschen der unterschiedlichsten Völker zusammenbringt. Und das ist wichtig. Der beste Grund, Wissenschaftler zu werden, ist doch, dass das die einzig wirklich internationale Familie ist. Und der Grund dafür ist, dass wir nicht personenbezogen denken. Unser strenger Vorgesetzter ist das Universum selbst. Und hier sehen Sie das Team mit meinen beiden Kollegen, die nicht hier sind. Das ist unsere Gruppe in Großbritannien. Und hier ist eine weitere Gruppe und Sie erkennen, wie international diese Gruppe in Florida State ist. Prishan aus Indien sitzt hier im Publikum. Er war früher auch dort. Eigentlich kommt Paul Dirac gar nicht mehr zu uns. Egal, aber er kam früher. Ich weiß nicht, ich hätte es einfach gerne, dass er käme, weil wir Probleme haben, die er möglicherweise lösen könnte. Ich habe den Vega Science Trust vor vielen Jahren mit dem Ziel gegründet, Programme für das Fernsehen zu entwickeln. Wir konnten Max Perutz gewinnen und wir hatten phantastische Programme mit Feynman, die wir aus Auckland erhielten. Und wir haben ein neues Konzept für Fernsehdebatten eingeführt. Und das besteht darin, dass die Teilnehmer tatsächlich etwas wissen sollten. Sie sind auf dieser Website zu finden. Allerdings ist etwas Phantastisches passiert. Wer von Ihnen hat in eine Enzyklopädie geschaut? In dieser Woche? Ja, wir standen noch vor dieser Herausforderung. Aber jetzt geschieht etwas Revolutionäres. Ich bezeichne das als "Goo You Wiki World". Und das ist wirklich eine phantastische Revolution. Früher musste man zur Encyclopedia Britannica greifen, wenn man ein Bild brauchte. Das war nicht sehr phantasievoll. Aber wenn man den Bilder-Browser von Google benutzt und alles eingibt, was man sucht, erhält man Seiten über Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und Seiten und kann sogar rotierende Buckyballs betrachten. Uns so etwas ist natürlich in der Encyclopedia Britannica schwierig zu realisieren. Das ist eine Revolution in dreifachem Sinne, eine phantastische Revolution, eine Paradigmenverschiebung, was das Suchen, Finden und Zugreifen auf Informationen in Sekundenschnelle betrifft. Man kann sein eigenes Material erstellen, kreativ sein, vorhandenes Wissen ergänzen. Und Wikipedia ist meiner Meinung nach eine der großartigsten Einrichtungen, die jemals erfunden wurden. Eine halbe Million Menschen, die ihr Wissen, ihre Leidenschaft, ihre Interessen altruistisch und anonym für uns bereitstellen. Wir schaffen gerade etwas, das auch ein bisschen in diese Richtung geht, ein globales Währungsmittel der eigenen Links. Und Sie können dazu beitragen. Es heißt GYWW 2.0. Ich nenne es GEOSET, Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology. Wir verwenden eine Erfassungsstation. Wir nutzen die Technologie. Das passiert hier. Schauen Sie sich das an. Das ist genau das Gleiche. Wir machen das auch so. Aber wir befähigen Sie dazu, das selbst zu verwenden. Nicht nur diese verdammten Nobelpreisträger. Sie können es selbst verwenden. Und wir zeigen Ihnen, wie das geht. Und wir machen das auch mit unseren Studenten. Das ist eigentlich die Zukunft der Sendetechnik. John Cornforth, ein Australier, hasste Murdock und stellte ihm die folgende Frage: "Haben Sie ...". John hasste ihn seit 15 Jahren. Er ist Australier und schämte sich dafür, dass Murdoch ein Australier war. Und er fragte: "Haben Sie Ihren Respekt vor der Wahrheit allmählich verloren oder hatten Sie den nie?" Das war Rupert Murdoch, vor 15 Jahren. Ich zeige Ihnen, was unsere Studenten machen. Ich möchte Ihnen das zeigen, weil sie einfach so phantastisch sind. Hi, mein Name ist Kerry Gilmore und ich bin Doktorand hier an der Florida State University. Ich arbeite für Doctor L. Coogan als Organiker. Ich liebe die organische Chemie, weil sie mir die Möglichkeit bietet, etwas durchzuexerzieren und Architekt zu sein, Ingenieur zu sein, Konstrukteur zu sein, weil man wirklich etwas durchspielen kann und wirklich etwas entwickeln kann ... Und ich muss das jetzt hier etwas abkürzen, weil ich noch Einiges sagen möchte. Aber unsere Studenten machen wirklich phantastische Arbeit. Googeln Sie einfach GEOSET. Sie finden dort Dinge über Wölfe und Geheimagenten. Und wenn Sie wissen wollen, was ich da mache, finden Sie das auch dort. Wir haben den Lebenslauf revolutioniert. Wir legen Ihre Bewerbung ganz oben auf den Stapel. Wenn Sie einen Job wollen, haben Sie eine Chance, wenn Sie so arbeiten. Assessment. Grundsätzlich kann ich anstelle dessen das hier tun und ein Glas Wein dabei trinken. Die Hall of Fame. Unsere Studenten erhalten Jobs und Stipendien. Fully a Fulbright, wir haben einen tollen Medienpreis bekommen. Prishan hat vier unbefristete Stellen angeboten bekommen, ging zur medizinischen Fakultät, erhielt einen Job, erhielt ein Stipendium, ging zur Akademie, erhielt ein Gold-Water-Stipendium, erhielt einen Job beim NHK. Die hier ist wichtig. Sino in Japan, eine Postdoktorandin, schickte ihre Bewerbung nach Indien und erhielt einen Job an der Mahatma Gandhi University. Das sind also die Menschen, die mit uns verbunden sind. Und jemand, der weiß, wo wir stehen, ist meine Frau Margaret da vorne. Ich habe nicht mehr genug Zeit. Ich möchte aber noch zwei Dinge loswerden. Das eine betrifft die Haltung. Grundsätzlich wird einem immer erzählt, dass man Dinge tun soll, die einen begeistern. Das ist nicht ganz das Gleiche wie das hier: Tun Sie einfach etwas und geben Sie Ihr Bestes. Machen Sie nie etwas Zweitklassiges. Lassen Sie einfach die Finger davon, wenn es zweitklassig wäre. Wenn Sie das Zweitklassige nicht befriedigt, lassen Sie es besser sein. Sorgen Sie dafür, dass Sie selbst zufrieden sind, nicht der Lehrer oder irgendjemand anderes, für den Sie arbeiten. Wenn Sie so handeln, machen Sie es richtig. Das hier ist mein Lieblingsplakat. Im Grunde genommen bin ich ein fremdartiges Wesen. Ich wurde von einem anderen Planeten mit einer Botschaft des guten Willens von meinem Volk gesandt. Die Botschaft lautet: "Liebe Erdbewohner, wenn Ihr schließlich Euren Planeten zerstört habt, könnt Ihr zu uns kommen und bei uns leben und wir werden Euch beibringen, wie man in Frieden und Harmonie lebt. Und wir geben Euch einen 10%-Rabatt-Gutschein auf alle delikaten Pizzen. Mit freundlichen Grüßen Bob." Drei Dinge: Die Zerstörung des Planeten, wir haben gehört, dass wir Probleme bekommen werden. Frieden und Harmonie, ich bin davon überzeugt. Ist es nicht unglaublich, dass unsere Politiker die Probleme nicht lösen können, ohne so junge Menschen wie Sie in die Welt hinaus zu schicken, damit sie einander töten? Wir müssen das Problem lösen. Das ist das Wichtigste. Aber es steckt auch Humor in der Pizza. Ohne die Pizza könnte ich, glaube ich, nicht weiterleben. Leonard Cohen sagte einmal im Magazin Rolling Stone: "Ich betrachte mich nicht als Pessimist. Ein Pessimist ist jemand, der darauf wartet, dass es regnet. Und ich fühle mich durchnässt bis auf die Haut." Ich bin Optimist. Ich werde weg sein, wenn die Kacke am Dampfen ist. Wissenschaft gibt nur Aufschluss darüber, wie man zu denken hat. Alles andere verengt, was man zu denken hat. Denken Sie darüber nach. Wenn Sie daran interessiert sind, setzen Sie sich mit mir in Verbindung. Vielen Dank.

Harold Kroto introducing the educational platform GEOSET
(00:30:49 - 00:31:20)

 

9) There is also life outside the lab

Many laureates do encourage the young scientists to really immerse themselves in science and give everything to achieving their goals, however, not to the extent that they shut themselves up in the lab and cease to concern themselves with the outside world. A work-life balance is also key. Nobel Laureate Richard Ernst highlights the importance of extracurricular activities and in particular how important art has been to his career as well as to the careers of many famous scientists. As he puts it, a love and pursuit of art is not a distraction from one’s scientific career but rather is something which enriches and feeds into one’s scientific passion. Ben Feringa, meanwhile, highlights his love of ice-skating.

 

Richard Ernst (2013) - Widen Your Scope by Extracurricular Activities: My Example

Dear friends, after 2.5 days of highly exciting lectures with an extremely wide scope I have a little bit hesitation to show you this first slide here, ‘widen your scope’. I mean isn’t there rather a need to focus instead of de-focusing and to make it even wider. So I mean we learned that even theoretical physics is part of chemistry. We learned that clinical medicine is even part of chemistry. So there is nothing beyond chemistry. And I mean when we go to the next slide, we can read what Georg Christoph Lichtenberg had said 300 years ago: So you have indeed to widen your scope beyond chemistry. Otherwise you cannot understand chemistry. So I mean we need something in addition. And we need in addition passions. We need passions in addition just to the profession. And only with this complement our life becomes complete. Now, I hope you are not trapped in this rotating cylinder here. You will never reach Mr. Nobel if you are trapped in here. You have to get out in some way. And that shouldn’t be your only question you ask day by day when you wake up in the morning: You know this rat race which you see here is a self-defeating or pointless pursuit. Excessive or competitive work with little reward or purpose as it has been pointed out already in Wikipedia. So winning a Nobel Prize should never be a goal. Cross out this goal here, that shouldn’t be a goal in your life. I mean it should remain an unexpected surprise in your life. It should just happen when it has to happen. But don’t just have your focus on the Nobel Prize itself. I mean you know that’s that Einstein once said: “The one who follows blindly the crowd will usually get no further than the crowd. And the one who walks alone is likely to find himself in places no one ever has been before.” So I mean what you have to become is a lonelier. You have to walk alone this road and find your goal and not care about the rest. So open your eyes. Open your eyes and see what is around you. And then you can become inspired. I mean inspiration you don’t get inside of the field but it usually comes from outside. So let me tell you a little bit about my history, how my interest in chemistry developed and so on. I mean I started to study at ETH Zürich. And after finishing my undergraduate studies I went to Herr Professor Günthard and ask him: And then he just said 3 letters, NMR. And I had never heard this abbreviation before. So these were my question marks. And I asked him: “What it means NMR?” And he explained it to me in very simple terms. He said: “You know about molecules and molecules consist of atoms. So let’s take an atom out and when we blow it up we find atomic nucleus in the centre of the atom. And this is not just a sphere but it has magnetic properties. It has a magnetic moment built in and it’s rotating about its own axis. And that’s what we call the nuclear spin.” And then a guy at ETH already has found before that when you apply now a magnetic field, then this nucleus starts to precess about the magnetic field with a frequency omega proportion to the magnetic field strength. And that were Edward Purcell in Boston and Felix Bloch at ETH Zürich. He has been graduated at the same institute as me. Anyway, Professor Günthard said: “Don’t do just theory, do always experiments. Combine experiments with theory and only then you make inventions.” So that’s what he tried to indicate here by his dance. So, if you have an alcohol molecule for example, you have 3 different hydrogens, methyl group, methylene group, the OH hydrogen. And they field different magnetic fields. So they precess with different speeds. And you can with these speeds measure the local field within the molecule. And you can characterise the molecule this way. And he said: “That might be interesting for chemistry.” So we started to build an NMR spectrometer together with my supervisor Hans Primas. We built this little cute instrument and it was a great disappointment. You see, it took much too long to record one of these crazy NMR spectra. You have to wait for days and days and usually in the meantime the spectrometer was breaking down and you had to start from scratch again. But anyway I was very much disappointed. And I thought I should get out of this field, do something more decent. Went out of ETH, I disliked ETH. I disliked Switzerland. I went to California into the holy land of science. And here I thought I could achieve something. But what did I meet? I met Weston Anderson at Varian Associates and he was concerned with exactly the same problem as me. But he didn’t only see the problem, he also saw solutions. And he told me: “I mean if you have a complicated spectrum, just try to do it in parallel. Build a multichannel spectrometer. One channel, second channel, third, fourth, fifth and so on. And do everything together. So in this way you can save time, you can make the experiment much more sensitive and that’s the way to do it." So he decided to build here this rotating cylinder which he calls his Prayer Wheel which creates all these frequencies necessary to simultaneously irradiate the entire spectrum. It never really worked and today it’s in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington if you want to see it. But that never recorded an NMR spectrum. But fortunately he had a Swiss slave in his research group. And together with his Swiss slave they made an invention. And this Swiss slave he... I mean his passion at that time was music. And he knew that in music... I mean several voices together, having a group of people, an orchestra playing together it goes all simultaneously. And that’s very important. So you have... It’s like pushing the keyboard with this rod here, all the keys at the same time and you are getting superpositions of different frequencies. And you need to be musical. Otherwise you can’t analyse here the spectrum and to get the different spectral lines or the different sounds. Now 88 keys on a single stroke. But it requires a musical ear. Otherwise you can’t do the analysis. What are you doing when you are not musical? You buy a computer. You buy a computer and do a mathematical Fourier transformation and you get your spectrum at once. That was the birth of the Fourier Transform NMR. Strong pulse, decay, Fourier transformation, you get the spectrum in no time. That was the solution. Now you get this spectra here of biomolecules in reasonable amount of time and the method becomes practical. You can do identification here of this protein and so on. So here for the first time I started to believe in science. I started to believe in NMR. You have now this tree of knowledge here. And you have now a ladder, a ladder by which you can climb on the tree and come safely down again. Going up to clinical medicine and going down to basic physics. Connect everything together. And I got caught by science. And I don’t get my finger out of the mouth anymore of this scull. He caught me forever. That’s how gripping science can be. And I hope it will also do the same with you. Anyway, that was my little toy with which I was playing at that time. But then, you know, Herbert Marcuse, he was speaking about the one-dimensional man. How boring one-dimensional people can be. And he writes it here: Their universe of discourse is populated by self-validating hypotheses which incessantly and monopolistically repeated, become hypnotic definitions of dictations.” I mean only a German can write this horrible English or perhaps a Swiss. But I mean it’s very hard to understand what he means. But I mean if you think about it for a long time it becomes clear. But he dislikes the one-dimensional man. So my vision was multi-dimensional approaches. And you see it already here, we have to open the curtain. The multi-dimensional liberation. And here you see now the multi-dimensional universe behind the screen and here as well. And that is multi-dimensional spectroscopy which can be of great value. I mean having just instead of a 1-dimensional spectrum, have a 2-dimensional spectrum, that’s the 1-dimensional spectrum along the diagonal. We have the cross peaks here. And they contain now connectivity information in molecules. So you can determine what Kurt Wüthrich was talking about before to determine molecular structures. For example a 2-dimensional spectrum like this you can take now really the correlation information out. And that, when he heard about it: “Hey, that’s not only a cute experiment, this is useful in our hands. So let’s do it together.” And that’s where we started our collaboration. And trying to measure here distances through space, distances through chemical bonds. And he determined then the structures from this information. You can do it in 3 dimensions. You can get the 3-dimensional spectrum for example by applying 3 pulses having 3 time variables doing 3-dimensional Fourier transformation to get the 3-dimensional spectrum like here recorded in my group some time ago. But the pulse sequence has become very complicated. I mean this looks like the score of a symphony orchestra, everything playing together and getting harmonious result out. Ok, that’s NMR in chemistry. But you know, NMR is also very important in clinical medicine. You put here your friend into the magnet and see whether there is something inside. And it’s really revealing information which can come out by doing MRI, magnetic resonance imaging. And I mean the experiment is very similar to what I was describing about. You apply a magnetic field gradient which is important along one axis. Then you apply it along a second axis. You do a 2-dimensional Fourier transform of these oscillations here in 2 dimensions and you get a 2-dimensional display. For example here part of my brain. Unfortunately it’s not a good image. Not good because it tells you unpleasant truth. Namely what you see here, this is my problem, that’s my stenosis. And the doctor in charge who saw this image first he said: “Oh, Professor Ernst, don’t care so much. You will have a very easy death. The world will just disappear in front of your eyes and then you will be alone for the rest.” So I am still waiting for that. It didn’t happen yet but it could happen any second. So that’s one problem. Nobody did anything about it so it’s still present. This is another problem which I had a little bit before in 2010. You see my 2 legs here. MRI images angiography, you see beautiful blood flow here from the top to the foot down here. But there is no blood flow at all in the left leg. And the left foot was white, it was painful, I couldn’t walk anymore. And they said: “That’s not good. We have to do some surgery. We have to do a bypass surgery here in your leg here, get in a new artery from here to down there.” And then I can dance again. And everything works fine. Applause. So, MRI didn’t heal but I mean it indicated what has to be done. So it was very useful. And functional imaging, I mean if your brain doesn’t work properly anymore, do functional imaging. You can image everything, whatever you want. The NMR is limitless. So, unlimited possibilities for conceiving novel and useful experiments in multiple dimensions. Ok let’s go back in time a little bit. I mean in 1968 we returned from California to Switzerland. So, we had 2 American girls in our family at that time, we sent out children back by airmail to Switzerland and we went via Asia. And it was really an experience. First time in Asia and we went... So here we discovered more dimensions. More dimensions... So it really became multidimensional our life. We went to Kathmandu. It was a medieval city at that time, bare feet people on the street, rainy at that particular day. The market here of Kathmandu. And here on this market they sold paintings, this kind of painting. And that’s a Tibetan painting. The refugees bringing these paintings over Himalaya to Nepal and they had to survive so they wanted to make money out of them and we bought exactly this painting here. This is a Thangka painting. We didn’t understand anything at that time but it was colourful, beautiful. And you know colours, pigments, these are chemicals. So, I mean chemistry is coming in here also through the beauty. And we have here actually 4 Arhats, disciples of Buddha, and they spread the message in the different parts of India here. This one here in northern India and in Pakistan, Islamabad, Punjab. This near Mumbai. This one here in the triangle between Yamuna and the Ganges rivers. And the last one he went to the island. So, I mean that was displayed here. We found that out later on this Thangka which we took home. So I had now my 2 sided fascination. On the one side NMR, 2-dimensional structures, colourful structures coming out and the colourful Tibetan art. And if you look now at my brain here, that’s my head here, it looks reasonable but you see here the frontal lobe. That was science. And if you look at the part back here, the parietal lobe, you find Tibetan art here. So, I mean these were on 2 parts of my brain. And they sure are overlapping. They belong together. And there are contacts. And I will tell you a little bit about these contact just in a second. So, we have now this paintings, we took that whole painting home. We were proud to have a beautiful Tibetan painting. We became collectors. This is just the first painting which we had. We have now 100s of this kind of paintings at home. We’re living in a Tibetan temple now so to say in Winterthur. Not far from here if you go across the lake, you are just already there. Anyway, it’s not only the fascination for Tibet art which came out of this painting. Also I became interested in cultural history of central Asia. It’s very complicated but very fascinating. I learned about painting technology and conservation, restoration in order to keep my paintings in good shape. I had to learn something about Buddhist philosophy for a basic understanding. And finally we wanted to give the Tibetans something back. So we started a series of courses in south India where we teach Tibetan monks western science to have a 2 way exchange of spirituality going from the East to the West and science going from the West to the East. So I started now to become a little bit more interested in the details of Tibetan history and art. You see here that in the development of Tibetan art history there are these different schools, Buddhist schools here which are colour coded here. I don’t want to go into the details. But from these different schools these paintings were originating. And I just show you now a set of paintings. And we look a little bit inside and we see, experience here multidimensionality in a different way, in a Tibetan way. We have here for example a Mandala painting from 1580, it’s hanging in our house just across the lake. And it’s a beautiful painting. But it has structures. It has structures here. It’s like a quasicrystal and you can look inside and you can make many discoveries. For example here you see this colour coding. We have the red quarter and the yellow quarter and the white one and the blue one. You see that’s the blue one, that’s the white one, that’s a yellow one, that’s a red one. And we have a green centre. These are the 5 dimensions of Tibetan thinking. They have 5 spatial dimensions with the centre going so to say to heaven. And we have now different dimensions in that painting going from outside to the inside. I mean that’s so to say a pathway towards the centre, the centre of your brain, of your mind, spirituality, your beliefs, whatever. That you experience that going from outside now to the centre here. And what you find here is so to say a body/mind connection. I mean of course what we need first of all we need a body. That’s a body mandala here, this square. You have here the speech mandala. You need speech in order to express the thoughts. You need think mandala which makes the connections. And finally you arrive at the wisdom mandala and after all in the centre enlightenment. So these are the different coordinates here going from outside to inside. So you see there is a lot contained in this graphical description of reality. And in the centre we find Kalachakra, that’s the main deity of this particular mandala, and his companion here in a union. He represents a male element. Kalachraka and he is so to say the real represent, the wheel of time, the ever going wheel of time, the treadmill you are sitting in. And then his companion, his companion Vishvamata, and she is the all-mother. She is so to say the static element and he’s the dynamic element and they belong together. Anyway, you can go further to look at more detail. And you see then there are mandalas within the mandala. There are smaller mandalas with 30 deities here contained by... A goat and a dog here carried this mandala. So it’s an incredible complexity within this. And something like a fractal ordering. You can go deeper, deeper inside. You always discover a new world. And that makes it so fascinating to look at these paintings in detail. It’s something like a babushka principle. Smaller, smaller, smaller babies and you still discover a new one when you open the last one. This is a painting of the 8th Dalai Lama on the moment of his enthronement 1762. You see him here. You see his birth place over here. That’s where he was born. So his life history so to say is encoded in this painting. You see here the guests coming to this ceremony of his enthronement. You see Mongols here, you see Chinese here, you see Indians. It’s very fascinating to look at these paintings. And they are so rich. You see here another dimension, the dimension of our ever going on life, namely rebirth. You know the Buddhist believe in rebirth and the Yamantaka, he is the conqueror of death. So he is responsible for this bridge going into the next life. And he’s a very strong personality, has his 1,000 arms here carrying symbols here. He has his 8, 9 heads. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. And he represents Manjusri. And Manjusri is the deity of wisdom. So wisdom and strength belong together. And I mean in this way he’s a very nice symbol for a scientist. I mean a scientist who should also have this combination of wisdom, Manjusri, and strength to overcome all the difficulties of the experiments and so on. That’s a deity which I like a lot. Ok let’s look at another painting. That was done actually in this monastery here in Derge. You have here Lhasa, that’s Tibet here in between. And we have a monk coming from Ngor monastery to Derge monastery and then this painting which I show you has been done. That’s here. And it’s a fascinating aspect of this painting that there is a painter’s workshop. And you see it actually here. I will blow it up in a second. You see it here. That’s a painter’s workshop. And let’s blow it further up. Here we have 2 rooms. We have the master’s room and the student’s room. And they’re working on paintings. Let’s blow it further up. We have here the master painter. That’s Zhu-chen, we know exactly who he is. And that was done 1770, something like that. He died in 1774. And he is making now the sketch of a Thangka on this canvas here. A monk is just stabilising the canvas. Another monk is making the ink for making his drawing, a little monk holding the ink pot for the great master. We have a teacher and a student watching what the great master is doing. And who is this down here. That’s a good for nothing, he is enjoying his life and looking out into the world and sees the birds flying by and so on. And you always find this kind of charming details in these kind of paintings. Ok, here we have the student rooms and here they put in the pigments into the different areas of the painting according to the inscriptions by the master painter. The master painter... These are the pigments which can be chemically analysed. We are just coming to it in a second. And these are the symbols which the master painter used to indicate what sort of pigment has to be put where in the painting. So if you use minium orange, that’s la, this Tibetan symbol here for yellow, ser. So these are the symbols which we should find underneath the paint layers if you can look through the paint layers. And you can do that by infrared photography. So we take a normal camera, you have a camera like that at home. You buy just an infrared filter, put it in front of it and then you have an infrared camera and you take a photo of your Thangka painting or whatever. Then you can distinguish between the IR-transparent pigments and the non-transparent pigments. And the transparent pigments they allow you to look through, to peek through the paint layer and perhaps to find the symbols. So this is the characteristics of this infrared filter, stop and pass. And here we have a painting. It’s a slightly different one. But when we look now with infrared at this particular painting, that’s what we see. And you see now here these symbols. And these symbols they are standing here for the various colours which the master painter indicated and the students had to fill in. So we can really get behind the scene and see how these paintings have been done. For example we look at this mandala painting from before. And if you look at it through an infrared filter, that’s what was done by the master painter and the colours have been put in by the students. Another beautiful painting. It’s an old one, from 1280. And if we look at this painting here by an infrared filter, that’s what we see. That’s the normal display. That’s an infrared display and you see for example we have here black, black hair and we have these black Makara. But if you look at the infrared, then it’s black in the infrared, the hair. But these Makara here are bright. So there are different pigments. And we can analyse these pigments now in this way. We find here Azurite, the blue. We find Malachite, the green. We find Indigo which is the transparent blue, here and there and here as well. So in this way we can do a preliminary pigment analysis just by a filter. But the best way is to do Raman spectroscopy. And that’s what I am doing now. I have in my home in Winterthur at the side of the lake I have a Raman spectrometer in the basement. I am so to say married to my charming lady and I’m married also to the Raman spectrometer. And both are charming, both cause problems from time to time. But otherwise it’s an ideal combination I think. Anyway, Raman is a very simple technique. And you have a painting like that and you irradiate here with a laser beam. And then you get stray light out. And this stray light has now different colours, namely the basic laser frequency is modified by the vibrations of the molecules in the layer. So these are reflections of the pigments. And you can analyse the pigments by analysing here if these spectra is on the left or the right hand side. And you see here Raman spectra characterising the different blues. And I don’t have to go into the details but you see the various blues have completely different spectra and it’s immediately clear what sort of a blue you have in front of you. That’s my basement here. That’s where I spend my night hours here. And actually the painting which you saw before is now shown here. You can look through the glass here with the microscope, Raman microscope, and determine the pigments. And what we find for example in that particular painting, we see 2 different, completely different pigments for some Makara which was bright and the hair which was dark in the infrared display. And you see they are completely different spectra. So in this way you can identify these pigments now really completely. And it’s clear then what sort of pigments are involved. I am coming to a final example. And this is coming from this very charming, beautiful monastery here, Drigung monastery. It’s not too far from Lhasa, east of Lhasa. That’s the typical way of building monasteries growing onto the hill. You see it here from a different side. And in this monastery this painting has been done. And this is in our house now. It’s a very beautiful painting here with these 4 monks here and some smaller personalities here. It’s all very easy to understand. Namely what we have here, that’s a founder of the monastery, founder of Drigung monastery. And these 2 were his masters. And this here is the master of the masters. So it’s what they call a lineage, a lineage showing the dependency from earlier generations. And we have them here. We have... It starts with Adibuddha number 1. And then we have 2 Indian saints here, Tilopa and Naropa. We have then a Tibetan who took the information into Tibet, Atisa, number 4. We have the translator, Marpa who translated from the Sanskrit into the Tibetan. So all that you can learn from these paintings and it’s all logically arranged and if you can read this notation you get a lot of inside information. And finally we come here to Jigten Gonpo, that’s number 10 and he is the founder of the monastery. That’s so to say his dependency from the Buddha, Adibuddha Vajradhara, number 1. Anyway, you see these very beautiful faces of this. They are really very charming in these paintings. You see them here again and of course we wanted to know how old is this painting. And for this you can do carbon-14 dating. You know it has been discussed before this morning. So carbon 14 is created by radioactive, by cosmic protons coming onto the material and then generating carbon-14 from nitrogen-14 here, that’s the last step. And then, from then on it starts to decay. It’s a radioactive material, carbon 14. And from the decay rate or the decay efficiency you can determine the age of the material. And the half life time of carbon 14, it has already been said today, is 5,730 years. And this can be determined for example at the ETH in Zurich. You have here an accelerator mass spectrometer and by that you determine here this decay curves. And when you measure a certain intensity, you can go into here and determine the age of the material. And you find here that this painting comes from 1229 plus or minus 61 years. So you have a physical method to determine age. And then you can look at the pigments. I have the blue pigment here and you find this is indigo. The green pigment is actually a mixture of yellow and blue. Orpiment is yellow, indigo is the blue component giving the green. We have the yellow which is orpiment. We have cinnabar and orpiment mixed. You can get all these different pigments. And this can give you information from where possibly this painting is coming from. Because what you find when you look at this set of pigments here, these are not typical Tibetan pigments. These are Nepalese pigments. So most likely it was a Nepalese painter who went to Tibet and made this painting in Tibet. And if you compare now with a Nepalese painting, you find here exactly the same pigment. It’s a beautiful painting. It’s hung in our house. And when I have male visitors in our house I tell them: “Be careful, that’s a dangerous lady.” And whenever you get enchanted by a lady, first look at her backside. And then I turn the painting around. And you see Agni here and Agni is the deity of fire. So he will burn you to death when you come too near to this lady. So ok, expand your horizon, science and passion that’s what I wanted to tell you. And I’d just like very briefly to go through a set of slides here that others had similar experiences, you know Einstein with his beloved violin. You know Murray Gell-Mann is the famous physicist, a bird watcher. Except that he’s watching, looking in the wrong direction. The bird is sitting on his head. Or Richard Feynman drumming, drumming, drumming, drumming. Or Djerassi, a famous chemist who invented the pill, is a writer. Or Manfred Eigen, a chemist and pianist playing Mozart concertos. Or Ruzicka, he’s a collector at ETH. He’s dead by now. Or Roald Hoffmann, he’s a stage manager. He organises now these events at the Cornelia Street Café which you should visit whenever you go to New York. And then we have Leonardo Da Vinci, engineer, scientist and artist. He’s really a centipede, he has at least a 1,000 different passions. He combines so to say everything in his personality. So I mean what you find here also is that curiosity and creativity are essentially the common denominator of sciences and art. They belong together. And those who retain their childlike curiosity and creativity become either scientists or in the best case artists. So keep your eyes open. Discover the world, it’s beautiful and there is so much to be discovered. And with that I’d like to close my lecture. Applause.

Liebe Freunde, nachdem wir jetzt zweieinhalb Tage lang äußerst anregende Vorträge mit einer extrem großen Bandbreite gehört haben, zögere ich ein bisschen, Ihnen die erste Folie zu zeigen. Sie trägt den Titel: „Den Horizont erweitern.“ Müssen wir nicht eher unseren Blick stärker lenken, anstatt ihn noch mehr schweifen zu lassen und den Blickwinkel zu erweitern? Wir haben erfahren, dass selbst die theoretische Physik Teil der Chemie ist. Wir haben erfahren, dass auch die klinische Medizin Teil der Chemie ist. Jenseits der Chemie gibt es also nichts. Auf der nächsten Folie lesen wir, was Georg Christoph Lichtenberg vor dreihundert Jahren gesagt hat: Man muss also in der Tat seinen Horizont erweitern und über den Tellerrand der Chemie hinausblicken, sonst versteht man auch die Chemie nicht. Wir brauchen also noch etwas dazu. Wir brauchen dazu die Leidenschaft. Wir brauchen Leidenschaft als Ergänzung unserer Profession. Nur mit dieser Ergänzung wird unser Leben komplett. Ich hoffe, Sie sind nicht in diesem Hamsterrad gefangen. Sie werden Herrn Nobel niemals nahekommen, wenn Sie darin gefangen sind. Sie müssen irgendwie da herauskommen. Das sollte aber nicht die einzige Frage sein, die Sie sich täglich nach dem Aufwachen stellen: Dieses Hamsterrad, das Sie hier sehen, ist eine selbstzerstörerische, sinnlose Beschäftigung. Eine übermäßige bzw. von Konkurrenzkampf geprägte Arbeit, die wenig einbringt und zu nichts führt; hierauf hat schon (die englischsprachige) Wikipedia hingewiesen. Man sollte sich niemals zum Ziel setzen, einen Nobelpreis zu erhalten. Streichen Sie dieses Ziel, das sollte es in Ihrem Leben nicht geben. Es sollte eine unerwartete Überraschung in Ihre Leben bleiben. Es sollte einfach geschehen, wenn es geschehen muss. Denken Sie nicht immer nur an den Nobelpreis. Einstein hat einmal gesagt: „Wer blindlings der Masse nachläuft, kommt für gewöhnlich nicht weiter als die Masse. Wer allein unterwegs ist, wird sich wahrscheinlich an Orten wiederfinden, wo noch niemand gewesen ist.“ Sie müssen also Einzelgänger werden. Sie müssen diese Straße alleine gehen, Ihr Ziel finden und sich um den Rest nicht kümmern. Öffnen Sie Ihre Augen. Öffnen Sie Ihre Augen und nehmen Sie wahr, was um Sie herum ist. Dann können Sie sich inspirieren lassen. Inspiration kommt nicht aus dem Fachbereich; üblicherweise kommt sie von außen. Ich will Ihnen etwas über meinen Werdegang erzählen, wie mein Interesse an der Chemie geweckt wurde. Ich studierte an der ETH Zürich. Nachdem ich mein Studium beendet hatte, ging ich zu Professor Günthard und fragte ihn: Er machte sich daran, mich zu inspirieren; er flößte mir Campari und Cinzano ein. Als ich dann einen sitzen hatte, sagte er nur drei Buchstaben: Ich fragte ihn: „Wofür steht NMR?“ Er erklärte es mir in ganz einfachen Worten: Moleküle bestehen aus Atomen. Nehmen wir also ein Atom heraus. Wenn wir es aufblasen, finden wir im Zentrum des Atoms den Kern. Und das ist nicht einfach nur eine Kugel – diese Kugel hat magnetische Eigenschaften. Sie hat ein eingebautes magnetisches Moment und dreht sich um ihre eigene Achse. Das nennen wir den Kernspin.“ Jemand an der ETH hatte bereits herausgefunden, dass dieser Kern, wenn man ein Magnetfeld anlegt, mit der Frequenz Omega proportional zur Stärke des Magnetfelds präzediert. Es handelte sich um Edward Purcell in Boston und Felix Bloch an der ETH Zürich, der im selben Institut wie ich studiert hatte. Wie auch immer – Professor Günthard sagte: „Beschränken Sie sich nicht auf die Theorie, führen Sie immer Experimente durch. Kombinieren Sie Experimente mit der Theorie; nur dann macht man Erfindungen.“ Das ist es, was er durch diesen Tanz zum Ausdruck bringen wollte. Nehmen Sie zum Beispiel ein Alkoholmolekül. Hier stößt man auf drei verschiedene Wasserstoffe: die Methylgruppe, die Methylengruppe, den OH-Wasserstoff. Sie weisen unterschiedliche Magnetfelder auf, weshalb sie mit unterschiedlichen Geschwindigkeiten präzedieren. Anhand dieser Geschwindigkeiten kann man das lokale Feld im Inneren des Moleküls messen. Auf diese Weise lässt sich das Molekül charakterisieren. Und der Professor sage: „Das könnte für die Chemie interessant sein.“ So bauten wir zusammen mit meinem Doktorvater Hans Primas ein NMR-Spektrometer. Wir bauten dieses nette kleine Instrument und erlebten eine herbe Enttäuschung. Es dauerte viel zu lange, eines dieser blöden NMR-Spektren aufzunehmen. Man musste tagelang warten; üblicherweise hatte das Spektrometer während der Wartezeit einen Aussetzer, und man musste wieder von vorne anfangen. Ich war jedenfalls sehr enttäuscht. Ich dachte mir, ich sollte dieses Fachgebiet verlassen, etwas Anständiges tun. Also verließ ich die ETH, die ETH gefiel mir nicht. Ich mochte die Schweiz nicht. Ich ging nach Kalifornien, ins gelobte Land der Wissenschaft. Hier, so dachte ich, könnte ich etwas erreichen. Doch was musste ich erfahren? Bei Varian Associates lernte ich Weston Anderson kennen, der sich mit genau dem gleichen Problem herumschlug wie ich selbst. Er sah aber nicht nur das Problem, er sah auch Lösungen. Und er sagte zu mir: „Wenn du es mit einem komplizierten Spektrum zu tun hast, versuche einfach, es parallel anzugehen. Baue einen Multikanal-Spektrometer. Ein Kanal, zweiter Kanal, dritter, vierter und so weiter. Und bringe alles zusammen. Auf diese Weise kannst du Zeit sparen. Du sorgst dafür, dass das Experiment viel empfindlicher wird. So macht man das.“ Er beschloss also, hier diesen rotierenden Zylinder zu bauen, den er seine Gebetsmühle nannte. Der Zylinder erzeugt all diese Frequenzen, die zur gleichzeitigen Anregung des ganzen Spektrums erforderlich sind. Er hat nie richtig funktioniert; heute können Sie ihn im Smithsonian Museum in Washington bewundern. Wenn Sie ihn sehen wollen. Er hat aber kein einziges NMR-Spektrum aufgenommen. Zum Glück hatte er in seiner Forschungsgruppe einen Schweizer Sklaven. Zusammen mit seinem Schweizer Sklaven machte er eine Erfindung. Dieser Schweizer Sklave... seine Leidenschaft gehörte zu jener Zeit der Musik. Und er wusste, dass in der Musik... mehrere Stimmen zusammen, eine Gruppe von Menschen, ein Orchester, das zusammenspielt, alles läuft gleichzeitig ab. Das ist von großer Bedeutung. Man hat also... es ist, als würde man mit dieser Stange auf die Tastatur drücken, alle Tasten gleichzeitig; das erzeugt Überlagerungen verschiedener Frequenzen. Und man muss musikalisch sein, sonst kann man das Spektrum nicht analysieren, die verschiedenen Spektrallinien oder die verschiedenen Klänge nicht erkennen. Achtundachtzig Tasten auf einmal. Das erfordert ein musikalisches Gehör, sonst kann man keine Analyse durchführen. Was macht man aber, wenn man nicht musikalisch ist? Man kauft einen Computer. Man kauft sich einen Computer, führt eine mathematische Fourier-Transformation durch – und schon hat man sein Spektrum. Das war die Geburtsstunde der Fourier-Transform-NMR. Starker Impuls, Zerfall, Fourier-Transformation; in null Komma nichts hat man das Spektrum. Das war die Lösung. Jetzt erhält man diese Spektren von Biomolekülen in vertretbarer Zeit, und die Methode wird praktisch anwendbar. Man kann hier dieses Protein identifizieren und so weiter. Zum ersten Mal begann ich, an die Wissenschaft zu glauben. Ich begann, an NMR zu glauben. Hier sehen Sie den Baum der Erkenntnis. Jetzt hat man endlich eine Leiter – eine Leiter, mit der man auf den Baum klettern und wohlbehalten wieder zurückkehren kann. Man klettert hinauf zur klinischen Medizin und hinab zur grundlegenden Physik. Alles wird miteinander verbunden. Die Wissenschaft zog mich in ihren Bann. Ich bekomme meinen Finger gar nicht mehr aus dem Mund dieses Schädels; er hält mich für immer gefangen. So fesselnd kann die Wissenschaft sein. Und ich hoffe, sie wird mit Ihnen das Gleiche anstellen. Das war das kleine Spielzeug, mit dem ich zu jener Zeit spielte. Doch dann kam Herbert Marcuse, sie wissen schon – er sprach über den eindimensionalen Menschen. Darüber, wie langweilig eindimensionale Menschen sein können. Hier schreibt er: und ihren Lieferanten von Masseninformationen systematisch gefördert. Ihr sprachliches Universum ist voller Hypothesen, die sich selbst bestätigen und die, unaufhörlich und monopolistisch wiederholt, zu hypnotischen Definitionen oder Diktaten werden.“ Nur ein Deutscher ist zu so einer schrecklichen Sprache fähig, vielleicht auch ein Schweizer. Es ist sehr schwer zu verstehen, was er meint. Doch wenn man lange genug darüber nachdenkt, wird es klar. Er hat etwas gegen den eindimensionalen Menschen. Meine Vision waren multidimensionale Ansätze. Hier sehen Sie es schon, wir müssen den Vorhang öffnen. Die multidimensionale Befreiung. Hier auf dem Bildschirm sehen Sie das multidimensionale Universum. Hier auch. Das ist die multidimensionale Spektroskopie, die von großem Wert sein kann. Wenn man anstelle eines eindimensionalen Spektrums ein zweidimensionales hat Sie enthalten Konnektivitätsinformationen in Molekülen. So können Sie herausfinden, was Kurt Wüthrich vorhin meinte, als er über die Bestimmung molekularer Strukturen sprach. Einem zweidimensionalen Spektrum wie diesem zum Beispiel kann man jetzt tatsächlich die Korrelationsinformationen entnehmen. Als er davon hörte, sagte er: „Hey, das nicht nur ein nettes Experiment, das ist in unseren Händen nützlich. Machen wir es also zusammen.“ Damit begann unsere Zusammenarbeit. Wir versuchten, Entfernungen durch den Raum zu messen, Entfernungen durch chemische Verbindungen. Und er bestimmte anhand dieser Daten die Strukturen. Man kann es in drei Dimensionen durchführen. Das dreidimensionale Spektrum erhält man zum Beispiel, indem man drei Impulse anlegt und mit drei Zeitvariablen eine dreidimensionale Fourier-Transformation durchführt, um ein dreidimensionales Spektrum wie dieses zu erhalten, das in meiner Gruppe vor einiger Zeit aufgenommen wurde. Doch die Impulsfolge wurde sehr kompliziert. Das sieht wie die Partitur für ein Symphonieorchester aus; alles spielt zusammen, und heraus kommt ein harmonisches Resultat. Das ist NMR in der Chemie. Doch die NMR ist auch in der klinischen Medizin von großer Bedeutung. Sie legen hier Ihren Freund in den Magneten und stellen fest, ob etwas darin ist. Und das sind wirklich aufschlussreiche Informationen, die durch MRT, die Magnetresonanztomographie, sichtbar werden. Das Experiment ist dem, was ich beschrieben habe, sehr ähnlich. Man legt entlang einer Achse einen Magnetfeldgradienten an; das ist sehr wichtig. Dann legt man ihn an einer zweiten Achse an. Man führt eine zweidimensionale Fourier-Transformation dieser Oszillationen in zwei Dimensionen durch und erhält eine zweidimensionale Abbildung. Hier ist zum Beispiel mein Gehirn. Leider ist das kein schönes Bild. Nicht schön deshalb, weil es Ihnen die unangenehme Wahrheit verrät. Hier sehen Sie nämlich mein Problem, meine Stenose. Der verantwortliche Arzt, der dieses Bild als Erster sah, sagte: Sie werden einen sehr leichten Tod haben. Die Welt wird vor Ihren Augen verschwinden, und dann werden Sie allein sein.“ Darauf warte ich immer noch. Es ist noch nicht passiert, aber es könnte jeden Moment passieren. Das ist also ein Problem. Niemand hat es gelöst; es ist immer noch da. Hier ist ein anderes Problem, das ich vor einiger Zeit hatte, im Jahr 2010. Sie sehen hier meine zwei Beine. MRT-Bilder, Angiographie; hier sehen Sie einen schönen Blutfluss von oben bis hinunter in den Fuß. Aber hier, das linke Bein, ist überhaupt nicht durchblutet. Der linke Fuß war ganz weiß, er schmerzte, ich konnte nicht mehr gehen. Und die Ärzte sagten: „Das ist nicht gut. Wir müssen einen kleinen Eingriff vornehmen. Wir müssen hier in Ihrem Bein eine Bypass-Operation durchführen und von hier bis dort unten eine neue Arterie legen.“ Und jetzt kann ich wieder tanzen. Alles funktioniert wunderbar. Beifall. Die MRT hat mich nicht geheilt; sie hat aber gezeigt, was zu tun war. Sie war also sehr nützlich. Und funktionelle Bildgebung – wenn Ihr Gehirn nicht mehr richtig funktioniert, ist es Zeit für die funktionelle Bildgebung. Sie können alles darstellen, was immer Sie wollen. Die NMR kennt keine Grenzen. Unbegrenzte Möglichkeiten also für die Konzeption neuer und nützlicher Experimente in vielen Dimensionen. Begeben wir uns wieder in die Vergangenheit. Im Jahr 1968 kehrten wir von Kalifornien in die Schweiz zurück. Zu jener Zeit hatten wir zwei amerikanische Mädchen in unserer Familie. Unsere Kinder sandten wir per Luftpost in die Schweiz; wir nahmen den Weg über Asien. Das war wirklich ein Erlebnis. Zum ersten Mal in Asien, und wir gingen... hier entdeckten wir noch mehr Dimensionen. Mehr Dimensionen... unser Leben wurde in der Tat multidimensional. Wir kamen nach Katmandu. Das war zu jener Zeit eine mittelalterliche Stadt, Menschen barfuß auf der Straße, an diesem Tag hat es geregnet. Hier der Markt von Katmandu. Auf diesem Markt wurden Bilder verkauft, diese Art von Bildern. Das ist ein tibetisches Gemälde. Die Flüchtlinge brachten diese Gemälde über den Himalaya nach Nepal. Um zu überleben, machten sie die Bilder zu Geld, und wir kauften genau dieses Gemälde. Es handelt sich um ein Thangka-Gemälde. Zu jener Zeit verstanden wir nichts davon, aber es war farbenprächtig und schön. Und Sie wissen ja: Farben, Pigmente, das sind Chemikalien. Die Chemie hat also auch in der Schönheit ihren Platz. Was Sie hier sehen, sind vier Arhats, Schüler Buddhas; sie verbreiten die Lehre in den verschiedenen Teilen von Indien. Dieser hier in Nordindien und in Pakistan, Islamabad, Punjab. Dieser im Gebiet von Mumbai. Der hier im Dreieck zwischen den Flüssen Yamuna und Ganges. Und der letzte ging auf die Insel. Das ist es, was hier dargestellt ist. Das haben wir auf diesem Thangka, das wir mit nach Hause nahmen, später herausgefunden. Jetzt gab es also zwei Dinge, die mich faszinierten: einerseits NMR, zweidimensionale Strukturen, die Herausbildung farbenprächtiger Strukturen; andererseits die farbenprächtige tibetische Kunst. Und wenn Sie sich mein Gehirn ansehen – das hier ist mein Kopf; er sieht ganz gut aus... hier sehen Sie den Frontallappen; das ist der Sitz der Wissenschaft. Und in dem Teil dort hinten, im Scheitellappen, dort finden Sie tibetische Kunst. Das sind die zwei Teile meines Gehirns. Natürlich überlappen sie sich; sie gehören zusammen. Und es gibt Kontakte. Ich werde Ihnen gleich etwas über diese Kontakte erzählen. Jetzt haben wir also dieses Gemälde; wir haben das ganze Gemälde mit nach Hause genommen. Wir waren stolze Besitzer eines wunderschönen tibetischen Gemäldes. Wir wurden zu Sammlern. Das ist nur das erste Gemälde unserer Sammlung. Mittlerweile beherbergt unser Zuhause Hunderte von Gemälden dieser Art. Wir leben jetzt sozusagen in einem tibetischen Tempel, in Winterthur. Das ist gar nicht weit von hier; wenn Sie den See überqueren, sind Sie schon fast da. Wie auch immer – dieses Gemälde entfachte nicht nur die Faszination für tibetische Kunst. Es weckte auch mein Interesse an der Kulturgeschichte Zentralasiens. Die ist sehr kompliziert, aber auch äußerst faszinierend. Ich lernte Einiges über die Maltechnik, außerdem über Konservierung und Restauration, um meine Bilder in gutem Zustand zu erhalten. Als Grundlagenwissen musste ich mir etwas buddhistische Philosophie aneignen. Und schließlich wollten wir den Tibetern etwas zurückgeben. Wir riefen in Südindien eine Kursreihe ins Leben; dort unterrichten wir tibetische Mönche in westlicher Wissenschaft. Der Austausch fließt jetzt in beide Richtungen: Spiritualität von Osten nach Westen und Wissenschaft von Westen nach Osten. Ich interessierte mich mehr und mehr für die Einzelheiten tibetischer Geschichte und Kunst. Wie Sie hier sehen, entwickelten sich im Verlauf der tibetischen Kunstgeschichte diese verschiedenen Schulen, buddhistische Schulen, die hier farblich gekennzeichnet sind. Ich gehe jetzt nicht auf die Einzelheiten ein, doch aus diesen verschiedenen Schulen stammen die Gemälde. Ich zeige Ihnen jetzt ein paar Gemälde. Wenn wir uns das ein bisschen näher ansehen, sehen wir... erfahren wir Multidimensionalität auf eine andere Art, auf tibetische Art. Hier haben wir zum Beispiel ein Mandala-Gemälde von 1580; es hängt in unserem Haus am anderen Ufer des Sees. Das ist ein schönes Bild. Aber es weist Strukturen auf. Hier zeigt es Strukturen. Es ist wie ein Quasikristall – man kann hineinsehen und viele Entdeckungen machen. Hier sehen Sie zum Beispiel diese farblichen Kennzeichnungen. Wir haben das rote Viertel und das gelbe Viertel; das weiße und das blaue. Sehen Sie – das ist das blaue, das ist das weiße, hier das gelbe und dort das rote. Und es gibt ein grünes Zentrum. Das sind die fünf Dimensionen des tibetischen Denkens. Sie haben fünf räumliche Dimensionen, und das Zentrum führt sozusagen in den Himmel. Wenn wir in diesem Gemälde von außen nach innen gehen, finden wir verschiedene Dimensionen vor. Es handelt sich sozusagen um einen Pfad zum Zentrum, zum Zentrum des Gehirns, des Geistes, der Spiritualität, des Glaubens, was auch immer. Das erlebt man, wenn man von außen ins Zentrum vordringt. Was man hier findet, ist gewissermaßen eine Körper-Seele-Verbindung. Natürlich brauchen wir alle zuerst einmal einen Körper. Das hier ist ein Körper-Mandala, dieses Quadrat. Hier haben wir das Sprach-Mandala; man benötigt Sprache, um seine Gedanken ausdrücken zu können. Man braucht ein Gedanken-Mandala, das die Verbindungen herstellt. Schließlich erreichen Sie das Weisheits-Mandala, und zum Schluss, im Zentrum, die Erleuchtung. Das sind, von außen nach innen, die verschiedenen Koordinaten. Sie sehen also, diese grafische Darstellung der Realität hat viel zu bieten. Im Zentrum stoßen wir auf Kalachakra, die Hauptgottheit dieses Mandalas, und auf seine Gefährtin. Sie bilden eine Einheit. Er repräsentiert das männliche Element, Kalachakra; er repräsentiert gewissermaßen das Rad der Zeit, das sich unermüdlich drehende Rad der Zeit, das Hamsterrad, in dem man sich befindet. Seine Gefährtin Vishvamata ist die Allmutter. Sie ist sozusagen das statische Element. Er ist das dynamische Element, und sie gehören zusammen. Man kann sich das noch genauer ansehen; dann sieht man Mandalas im Mandala. Hier gibt es kleinere Mandalas mit dreißig Gottheiten... diese Mandalas werden von einer Ziege und von einem Hund getragen. Die Komplexität in diesem Gemälde ist unglaublich. So etwas wie eine fraktale Anordnung. Man noch tiefer gehen, tiefer ins Innere vordringen. Stets entdeckt man eine neue Welt. Das macht es so faszinierend, sich diese Gemälde genau anzusehen. Es ähnelt dem Babuschka-Prinzip – immer kleinere und kleinere und kleinere Babys, und wenn man das letzte öffnet, findet man wieder ein neues. Dieses Gemälde stellt den achten Dalai Lama im Augenblick seiner Inthronisierung im Jahr 1762 dar. Sie sehen ihn hier. Dort können Sie seinen Geburtsort sehen; hier wurde er geboren. Seine Lebensgeschichte ist also gewissermaßen in diesem Gemälde verschlüsselt. Hier sind die Gäste, die zur Feier seiner Inthronisierung kommen. Dort sehen Sie Mongolen, hier sind Chinesen, Sie sehen Sie Inder. Es ist wirklich faszinierend, sich diese Gemälde anzusehen. Sie sind äußerst reichhaltig. Hier sehen Sie eine andere Dimension, die Dimension Ihres immer weitergehenden Lebens, nämlich der Wiedergeburt. Wie Sie wissen, glauben die Buddhisten an die Wiedergeburt und an den Yamantaka, das ist der Bezwinger des Todes. Er ist zuständig für die Brücke, die ins nächste Leben führt. Und er ist eine sehr starke Persönlichkeit, er hat tausend Arme, in denen er Symbole trägt. Er hat acht... neun Köpfe – eins, zwei, drei, vier, fünf, sechs, sieben, acht neun. Acht dieser Köpfe sind furchteinflößend. Nur einer ist friedfertig, nämlich dieser dort oben. Er repräsentiert Manjusri. Manjusri ist die Gottheit der Weisheit. Weisheit und Stärke gehören also zusammen. So gesehen, ist er ein sehr schönes Symbol für einen Wissenschaftler, wie ich finde. Ich meine – auch ein Wissenschaftler sollte über diese Kombination aus Weisheit, Manjusri, und Stärke verfügen, um all die Mühsal der Experimente zu überwinden. Das ist eine Gottheit, die mir sehr gut gefällt. Sehen wir uns noch ein Bild an. Es ist in diesem Kloster entstanden, in Derge. Hier sehen Sie Lhasa, das dazwischen ist Tibet. Ein Mönch kommt vom Ngor-Kloster ins Derge-Kloster, und dann entstand dieses Gemälde, das ich Ihnen zeige. Das ist hier. Ein faszinierender Aspekt dieses Gemäldes besteht darin, dass es eine Malerwerkstatt zeigt. Sie können sie hier sehen; ich werde sie gleich vergrößern. Hier sehen Sie sie. Das ist eine Malerwerkstatt. Vergrößern wir es noch stärker. Hier haben wir zwei Räume. Wir haben den Raum der Meister und den Raum der Schüler. Sie arbeiten an Gemälden. Vergrößern wir es noch stärker. Das ist der Meistermaler. Es handelt sich um Zhu-chen, wir wissen genau, wer er ist. Das Gemälde entstand 1770, ungefähr um diese Zeit. Er starb 1774. Hier erstellt er gerade auf dieser Leinwand die Umrisszeichnung eines Thangkas. Ein Mönch hält die Leinwand fest. Ein anderer Mönch macht die Tinte für die Zeichnung, ein kleiner Mönch hält das Tintenfass für den großen Meister. Wir sehen einen Lehrer und einen Schüler, sie beobachten, was der Meister tut. Und wer ist das da unten? Das ist ein Taugenichts; er genießt sein Leben, sieht in die Welt hinaus, sieht die Vögel vorbeifliegen, und so weiter. In Gemälden dieser Art findet man immer diese bezaubernden Details. Nun gut. Hier haben wir den Raum der Schüler; sie tragen die Pigmente nach den Beschriftungen des Meistermalers in den verschiedenen Bereichen des Gemäldes auf. Der Meistermaler... Das sind die Pigmente, die sich chemisch analysieren lassen. Dazu kommen wir gleich. Das sind die Symbole, anhand derer der Meistermaler anzeigte, welche Art von Pigmenten an welcher Stelle des Gemäldes aufzutragen ist. Für Minium-orange steht das tibetanische Symbol „la“, für gelb das Symbol „ser.“ Das sind die Symbole, die unter den Farbschichten zu finden sein sollten, wenn man durch die Farbschichten hindurchsehen kann. Und das gelingt mit Infrarotfotografie. Man nimmt eine normale Kamera; eine Kamera wie die hier hat man zu Hause. Man kauft einen Infrarotfilter, setzt ihn vor das Objektiv, und schon hat man eine Infrarotkamera, mit der man das Thangka-Gemäldes oder was auch immer fotografieren kann. Man unterscheidet IR-transparente Pigmenten und intransparente Pigmente. Die transparenten Pigmente erlauben uns, durch die Farbschicht zu spähen und vielleicht die Symbole zu finden. Das ist die Eigenschaft des Infrarotfilters: blockieren und durchlassen. Hier haben wir ein Gemälde, ein anderes. Wenn wir dieses bestimmte Gemälde mit Infrarot betrachten, dann sehen wir das. Und jetzt sind hier diese Symbole erkennbar. Diese Symbole stehen für die verschiedenen Farben. Der Meistermaler hat sie vorgezeichnet und die Schüler hatten sie aufzutragen. Wir können also tatsächlich einen Blick hinter die Kulissen werfen und sehen, wie diese Gemälde entstanden sind. Sehen wir uns zum Beispiel dieses Mandala-Gemälde von vorhin an. Wenn man es durch einen Infrarotfilter betrachtet – das hat der Meistermaler gemacht, und die Farben wurden von den Schülern aufgetragen. Noch ein wunderschönes Gemälde. Ein altes, von 1280. Wenn wir dieses Gemälde durch einen Infrarotfilter betrachten, dann sehen wir das. Das ist die normale Darstellung, das ist eine Infrarot-Darstellung. Zum Beispiel sehen Sie – hier haben wir Schwarz, schwarze Haare, und wir haben diese schwarzen Makaras. Doch wenn man das Infrarotbild ansieht, dann sind zwar die Haare immer noch schwarz, aber die Makaras sind hell. Es handelt sich also um verschiedene Pigmente. Wir können die Pigmente nun auf diese Weise analysieren. Hier finden wir Azurit, blau. Wir finden Malachit, grün. Wir finden Indigo, das transparente Blau, hier und dort, hier ebenfalls. Auf diese Weise können wir also allein anhand eines Filters eine vorläufige Pigmentanalyse durchführen. Doch am besten geht es mit Raman-Spektroskopie. Und das mache ich gerade. Im Keller meines Hauses in Winterthur, am Ufer des Sees, habe ich ein Raman-Spektrometer. Ich bin sozusagen mit meiner bezaubernden Frau und mit dem Raman-Spektrometer verheiratet. Beide sind bezaubernd, beide bereiten manchmal Probleme. Doch ansonsten ist es eine ideale Kombination, glaube ich. Wie auch immer, Raman ist eine sehr einfache Technik. Man hat ein Gemälde wie das und richtet hier einen Laserstrahl darauf. Dann wird Streulicht abgestrahlt. Dieses Streulicht hat verschiedene Farben; die Grundfrequenz des Lasers wird durch die Vibrationen der Moleküle in der Farbschicht modifiziert. Das sind Reflexionen der Pigmente. Man kann die Pigmente analysieren, indem man feststellt, ob sich diese Spektren auf der linken oder auf der rechten Seite befinden. Hier sehen Sie Raman-Spektren, die für die verschiedenen Blautöne stehen. Ich muss nicht im Einzelnen darauf eingehen, aber wie Sie sehen, haben die verschiedenen Blautöne ganz verschiedene Spektren. Es ist sofort klar, welche Art von Blau man vor sich hat. Das ist mein Keller; hier verbringe ich meine Nächte. Das Gemälde, das ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, ist jetzt hier zu sehen. Man kann mit dem Mikroskop, dem Raman-Mikroskop, durch das Glas sehen und die Pigmente bestimmen. Und was finden wir zum Beispiel in diesem bestimmten Gemälde? Wir sehen zwei verschiedene, zwei völlig verschiedene Pigmente – eines für einen Makara, der in der Infrarotdarstellung hell war, und eines für das Haar, das schwarz war. Wie Sie sehen, sind das zwei völlig verschiedene Spektren. Auf diese Weise kann man die Pigmente mittlerweile vollständig identifizieren. Dann weiß man, mit welcher Art von Pigmenten man es zu tun hat. Ich komme zu einem abschließenden Beispiel. Es ist aus diesem überaus bezaubernden, schönen Kloster, dem Drigung-Kloster. Es liegt nicht weit von Lhasa entfernt, östlich von Lhasa. Das ist die typische Art, Klöster zu bauen; es wächst den Hügel hinauf. Hier sehen Sie es von einer anderen Seite. Und in diesem Kloster entstand dieses Gemälde. Das ist jetzt auch in unserem Haus. Es ist ein sehr schönes Bild, mit diesen vier Mönchen und einigen kleiner dargestellten Persönlichkeiten. Es ist alles sehr leicht zu verstehen. Hier haben wir einen Gründer des Klosters, den Gründer des Drigung-Klosters. Diese beiden waren seine Meister. Und das da ist der Meister der Meister. Es ist das, was man eine Abstammungslinie nennt, eine Linie, mit der die Abstammung von früheren Generationen dargestellt wird. Hier haben wir sie. Wir haben... Es beginnt mit Adibuddha, Nummer 1. Dann haben wir hier zwei indische Heilige, Tilopa und Naropa. Dann haben wir einen Tibeter, der die Lehre nach Tibet brachte – Atisa, Nummer 4. Wir haben den Übersetzer Marpa, der aus dem Sanskrit ins Tibetische übersetzt hat. All das kann man aus diesen Bildern lesen. Es ist alles logisch angeordnet, und wenn man die Darstellungsart versteht, erhält man Zugang zu vielen verborgenen Informationen. Schließlich kommen wir zu Jigten Gonpo, das ist die Nummer 10, der Gründer des Klosters. Das ist sozusagen seine Abstammung von Buddha, Adibuddha Vajradhara, Nummer 1. Wie auch immer – sehen Sie nur, wie schön diese Gesichter sind. In diesen Gemälden sind sie wirklich sehr bezaubernd. Hier sehen Sie sie noch einmal, und natürlich wollten wir wissen, wie alt dieses Gemälde ist. Hierfür kann man auf die Kohlenstoff-14-Datierung zurückgreifen. Die wurde heute Vormittag schon erörtert, wie Sie wissen. Kohlenstoff-14 wird von radioaktiven, von kosmischen Protonen erzeugt, die auf das Material gelangen und Kohlenstoff-14 aus Stickstoff-14 erzeugen; das ist der letzte Schritt. Und dann, ab diesem Zeitpunkt, beginnt es zu zerfallen. Es handelt sich um radioaktives Material, Kohlenstoff-14. Anhand der Zerfallsrate bzw. der Zerfallseffizienz kann man das Alter des Materials bestimmen. Die Halbwertszeit von Kohlenstoff-14, das wurde heute schon erwähnt, beträgt 5.730 Jahre. Das lässt sich zum Beispiel an der ETH in Zürich bestimmen. Mit diesem Massenbeschleunigungsspektrometer hier bestimmt man die Zerfallskurven. Wenn man eine bestimmte Intensität misst, kann man hier nachsehen und das Alter des Materials bestimmen. Und man stellt fest, dass dieses Gemälde aus dem Jahr 1229 stammt, plus/minus 61 Jahre. Es gibt also eine physikalische Methode der Altersbestimmung. Dann kann man die Pigmente untersuchen. Hier habe ich ein blaues Pigment, und man stellt fest, dass es Indigo ist. Das grüne Pigment ist in Wirklichkeit eine Mischung aus gelb und blau. Auripigment ist die gelbe Komponente, Indigo die blaue, zusammen ergeben sie das grüne. Wir haben das gelbe, Auripigment. Wir haben eine Mischung aus Zinnoberrot und Auripigment. Man stößt auf all diese verschiedenen Pigmente. Daraus kann man schließen, woher dieses Gemälde möglicherweise kommt. Denn wenn man hier diese Gruppe von Pigmenten untersucht, dann stellt man fest, dass es keine typisch tibetischen Pigmente sind. Das sind nepalesische Pigmente. Höchstwahrscheinlich haben wir es mit eine nepalesischen Maler zu tun, der nach Tibet gegangen ist und in Tibet dieses Bild gemalt hat. Wenn man es jetzt mit einem nepalesischen Gemälde vergleicht, findet man hier genau die gleichen Pigmente. Das ist ein schönes Bild. Es hängt in unserem Haus. Wenn wir männliche Gäste im Haus haben, dann sage ich zu ihnen: „Vorsicht, das ist eine gefährliche Lady. Wenn Sie von einer Dame verzaubert werden, sehen Sie sich zuerst ihre Rückseite an.“ Dann drehe ich das Bild um, und zum Vorschein kommt Agni. Agni ist die Gottheit des Feuers. Er wird Sie verbrennen, wenn Sie seiner Dame zu nahe kommen. Nun gut. Erweitern Sie Ihren Horizont, Wissenschaft und Leidenschaft, das wollte ich Ihnen nahebringen. Ich will nur noch kurz ein paar Folien durchgehen und zeigen, dass andere ähnliche Erfahrungen machten. Einstein mit seiner geliebten Geige. Murray Gell-Mann, der berühmte Physiker, ist ein Vogelbeobachter. Nur dass er in die falsche Richtung schaut – der Vogel sitzt auf seinem Kopf. Oder Richard Feynman, er trommelt, trommelt, trommelt, trommelt. Oder Djerassi, ein berühmter Chemiker, der die Pille erfand; er ist Schriftsteller. Manfred Eigen, ein Chemiker und Pianist, spielt Mozart-Konzerte. Oder Ruzicka, er ist ein Sammler an der ETH; mittlerweile ist er verstorben. Roald Hoffmann ist Inspizient. Er organisiert jetzt diese Veranstaltungen im Cornelia Street Café, das Sie besuchen sollten, wenn sie einmal nach New York kommen. Und dann haben wir Leonardo da Vinci, Ingenieur, Wissenschaftler und Künstler. Er ist buchstäblich ein Tausendfüßler, mit mindestens tausend verschiedenen Leidenschaften. Er vereint sozusagen alles in seiner Person. Hieran können Sie erkennen, dass Neugier und Kreativität im Grunde den gemeinsamen Nenner von Wissenschaft und Kunst bilden. Sie gehören zusammen. Wer sich seine kindliche Neugier und seine Kreativität bewahrt, wird entweder Wissenschaftler oder – im besten Fall – Künstler. Halten Sie also Ihre Augen offen. Entdecken Sie die Welt, sie ist wunderschön und es gibt viel zu entdecken. Damit möchte ich meinen Vortrag schließen. Beifall.

Richard Ernst highlights the importance of opening oneself up to extracurricular activities
(00:00:50 - 00:01:18)

 

Richard Ernst (2013) - Widen Your Scope by Extracurricular Activities: My Example

Dear friends, after 2.5 days of highly exciting lectures with an extremely wide scope I have a little bit hesitation to show you this first slide here, ‘widen your scope’. I mean isn’t there rather a need to focus instead of de-focusing and to make it even wider. So I mean we learned that even theoretical physics is part of chemistry. We learned that clinical medicine is even part of chemistry. So there is nothing beyond chemistry. And I mean when we go to the next slide, we can read what Georg Christoph Lichtenberg had said 300 years ago: So you have indeed to widen your scope beyond chemistry. Otherwise you cannot understand chemistry. So I mean we need something in addition. And we need in addition passions. We need passions in addition just to the profession. And only with this complement our life becomes complete. Now, I hope you are not trapped in this rotating cylinder here. You will never reach Mr. Nobel if you are trapped in here. You have to get out in some way. And that shouldn’t be your only question you ask day by day when you wake up in the morning: You know this rat race which you see here is a self-defeating or pointless pursuit. Excessive or competitive work with little reward or purpose as it has been pointed out already in Wikipedia. So winning a Nobel Prize should never be a goal. Cross out this goal here, that shouldn’t be a goal in your life. I mean it should remain an unexpected surprise in your life. It should just happen when it has to happen. But don’t just have your focus on the Nobel Prize itself. I mean you know that’s that Einstein once said: “The one who follows blindly the crowd will usually get no further than the crowd. And the one who walks alone is likely to find himself in places no one ever has been before.” So I mean what you have to become is a lonelier. You have to walk alone this road and find your goal and not care about the rest. So open your eyes. Open your eyes and see what is around you. And then you can become inspired. I mean inspiration you don’t get inside of the field but it usually comes from outside. So let me tell you a little bit about my history, how my interest in chemistry developed and so on. I mean I started to study at ETH Zürich. And after finishing my undergraduate studies I went to Herr Professor Günthard and ask him: And then he just said 3 letters, NMR. And I had never heard this abbreviation before. So these were my question marks. And I asked him: “What it means NMR?” And he explained it to me in very simple terms. He said: “You know about molecules and molecules consist of atoms. So let’s take an atom out and when we blow it up we find atomic nucleus in the centre of the atom. And this is not just a sphere but it has magnetic properties. It has a magnetic moment built in and it’s rotating about its own axis. And that’s what we call the nuclear spin.” And then a guy at ETH already has found before that when you apply now a magnetic field, then this nucleus starts to precess about the magnetic field with a frequency omega proportion to the magnetic field strength. And that were Edward Purcell in Boston and Felix Bloch at ETH Zürich. He has been graduated at the same institute as me. Anyway, Professor Günthard said: “Don’t do just theory, do always experiments. Combine experiments with theory and only then you make inventions.” So that’s what he tried to indicate here by his dance. So, if you have an alcohol molecule for example, you have 3 different hydrogens, methyl group, methylene group, the OH hydrogen. And they field different magnetic fields. So they precess with different speeds. And you can with these speeds measure the local field within the molecule. And you can characterise the molecule this way. And he said: “That might be interesting for chemistry.” So we started to build an NMR spectrometer together with my supervisor Hans Primas. We built this little cute instrument and it was a great disappointment. You see, it took much too long to record one of these crazy NMR spectra. You have to wait for days and days and usually in the meantime the spectrometer was breaking down and you had to start from scratch again. But anyway I was very much disappointed. And I thought I should get out of this field, do something more decent. Went out of ETH, I disliked ETH. I disliked Switzerland. I went to California into the holy land of science. And here I thought I could achieve something. But what did I meet? I met Weston Anderson at Varian Associates and he was concerned with exactly the same problem as me. But he didn’t only see the problem, he also saw solutions. And he told me: “I mean if you have a complicated spectrum, just try to do it in parallel. Build a multichannel spectrometer. One channel, second channel, third, fourth, fifth and so on. And do everything together. So in this way you can save time, you can make the experiment much more sensitive and that’s the way to do it." So he decided to build here this rotating cylinder which he calls his Prayer Wheel which creates all these frequencies necessary to simultaneously irradiate the entire spectrum. It never really worked and today it’s in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington if you want to see it. But that never recorded an NMR spectrum. But fortunately he had a Swiss slave in his research group. And together with his Swiss slave they made an invention. And this Swiss slave he... I mean his passion at that time was music. And he knew that in music... I mean several voices together, having a group of people, an orchestra playing together it goes all simultaneously. And that’s very important. So you have... It’s like pushing the keyboard with this rod here, all the keys at the same time and you are getting superpositions of different frequencies. And you need to be musical. Otherwise you can’t analyse here the spectrum and to get the different spectral lines or the different sounds. Now 88 keys on a single stroke. But it requires a musical ear. Otherwise you can’t do the analysis. What are you doing when you are not musical? You buy a computer. You buy a computer and do a mathematical Fourier transformation and you get your spectrum at once. That was the birth of the Fourier Transform NMR. Strong pulse, decay, Fourier transformation, you get the spectrum in no time. That was the solution. Now you get this spectra here of biomolecules in reasonable amount of time and the method becomes practical. You can do identification here of this protein and so on. So here for the first time I started to believe in science. I started to believe in NMR. You have now this tree of knowledge here. And you have now a ladder, a ladder by which you can climb on the tree and come safely down again. Going up to clinical medicine and going down to basic physics. Connect everything together. And I got caught by science. And I don’t get my finger out of the mouth anymore of this scull. He caught me forever. That’s how gripping science can be. And I hope it will also do the same with you. Anyway, that was my little toy with which I was playing at that time. But then, you know, Herbert Marcuse, he was speaking about the one-dimensional man. How boring one-dimensional people can be. And he writes it here: Their universe of discourse is populated by self-validating hypotheses which incessantly and monopolistically repeated, become hypnotic definitions of dictations.” I mean only a German can write this horrible English or perhaps a Swiss. But I mean it’s very hard to understand what he means. But I mean if you think about it for a long time it becomes clear. But he dislikes the one-dimensional man. So my vision was multi-dimensional approaches. And you see it already here, we have to open the curtain. The multi-dimensional liberation. And here you see now the multi-dimensional universe behind the screen and here as well. And that is multi-dimensional spectroscopy which can be of great value. I mean having just instead of a 1-dimensional spectrum, have a 2-dimensional spectrum, that’s the 1-dimensional spectrum along the diagonal. We have the cross peaks here. And they contain now connectivity information in molecules. So you can determine what Kurt Wüthrich was talking about before to determine molecular structures. For example a 2-dimensional spectrum like this you can take now really the correlation information out. And that, when he heard about it: “Hey, that’s not only a cute experiment, this is useful in our hands. So let’s do it together.” And that’s where we started our collaboration. And trying to measure here distances through space, distances through chemical bonds. And he determined then the structures from this information. You can do it in 3 dimensions. You can get the 3-dimensional spectrum for example by applying 3 pulses having 3 time variables doing 3-dimensional Fourier transformation to get the 3-dimensional spectrum like here recorded in my group some time ago. But the pulse sequence has become very complicated. I mean this looks like the score of a symphony orchestra, everything playing together and getting harmonious result out. Ok, that’s NMR in chemistry. But you know, NMR is also very important in clinical medicine. You put here your friend into the magnet and see whether there is something inside. And it’s really revealing information which can come out by doing MRI, magnetic resonance imaging. And I mean the experiment is very similar to what I was describing about. You apply a magnetic field gradient which is important along one axis. Then you apply it along a second axis. You do a 2-dimensional Fourier transform of these oscillations here in 2 dimensions and you get a 2-dimensional display. For example here part of my brain. Unfortunately it’s not a good image. Not good because it tells you unpleasant truth. Namely what you see here, this is my problem, that’s my stenosis. And the doctor in charge who saw this image first he said: “Oh, Professor Ernst, don’t care so much. You will have a very easy death. The world will just disappear in front of your eyes and then you will be alone for the rest.” So I am still waiting for that. It didn’t happen yet but it could happen any second. So that’s one problem. Nobody did anything about it so it’s still present. This is another problem which I had a little bit before in 2010. You see my 2 legs here. MRI images angiography, you see beautiful blood flow here from the top to the foot down here. But there is no blood flow at all in the left leg. And the left foot was white, it was painful, I couldn’t walk anymore. And they said: “That’s not good. We have to do some surgery. We have to do a bypass surgery here in your leg here, get in a new artery from here to down there.” And then I can dance again. And everything works fine. Applause. So, MRI didn’t heal but I mean it indicated what has to be done. So it was very useful. And functional imaging, I mean if your brain doesn’t work properly anymore, do functional imaging. You can image everything, whatever you want. The NMR is limitless. So, unlimited possibilities for conceiving novel and useful experiments in multiple dimensions. Ok let’s go back in time a little bit. I mean in 1968 we returned from California to Switzerland. So, we had 2 American girls in our family at that time, we sent out children back by airmail to Switzerland and we went via Asia. And it was really an experience. First time in Asia and we went... So here we discovered more dimensions. More dimensions... So it really became multidimensional our life. We went to Kathmandu. It was a medieval city at that time, bare feet people on the street, rainy at that particular day. The market here of Kathmandu. And here on this market they sold paintings, this kind of painting. And that’s a Tibetan painting. The refugees bringing these paintings over Himalaya to Nepal and they had to survive so they wanted to make money out of them and we bought exactly this painting here. This is a Thangka painting. We didn’t understand anything at that time but it was colourful, beautiful. And you know colours, pigments, these are chemicals. So, I mean chemistry is coming in here also through the beauty. And we have here actually 4 Arhats, disciples of Buddha, and they spread the message in the different parts of India here. This one here in northern India and in Pakistan, Islamabad, Punjab. This near Mumbai. This one here in the triangle between Yamuna and the Ganges rivers. And the last one he went to the island. So, I mean that was displayed here. We found that out later on this Thangka which we took home. So I had now my 2 sided fascination. On the one side NMR, 2-dimensional structures, colourful structures coming out and the colourful Tibetan art. And if you look now at my brain here, that’s my head here, it looks reasonable but you see here the frontal lobe. That was science. And if you look at the part back here, the parietal lobe, you find Tibetan art here. So, I mean these were on 2 parts of my brain. And they sure are overlapping. They belong together. And there are contacts. And I will tell you a little bit about these contact just in a second. So, we have now this paintings, we took that whole painting home. We were proud to have a beautiful Tibetan painting. We became collectors. This is just the first painting which we had. We have now 100s of this kind of paintings at home. We’re living in a Tibetan temple now so to say in Winterthur. Not far from here if you go across the lake, you are just already there. Anyway, it’s not only the fascination for Tibet art which came out of this painting. Also I became interested in cultural history of central Asia. It’s very complicated but very fascinating. I learned about painting technology and conservation, restoration in order to keep my paintings in good shape. I had to learn something about Buddhist philosophy for a basic understanding. And finally we wanted to give the Tibetans something back. So we started a series of courses in south India where we teach Tibetan monks western science to have a 2 way exchange of spirituality going from the East to the West and science going from the West to the East. So I started now to become a little bit more interested in the details of Tibetan history and art. You see here that in the development of Tibetan art history there are these different schools, Buddhist schools here which are colour coded here. I don’t want to go into the details. But from these different schools these paintings were originating. And I just show you now a set of paintings. And we look a little bit inside and we see, experience here multidimensionality in a different way, in a Tibetan way. We have here for example a Mandala painting from 1580, it’s hanging in our house just across the lake. And it’s a beautiful painting. But it has structures. It has structures here. It’s like a quasicrystal and you can look inside and you can make many discoveries. For example here you see this colour coding. We have the red quarter and the yellow quarter and the white one and the blue one. You see that’s the blue one, that’s the white one, that’s a yellow one, that’s a red one. And we have a green centre. These are the 5 dimensions of Tibetan thinking. They have 5 spatial dimensions with the centre going so to say to heaven. And we have now different dimensions in that painting going from outside to the inside. I mean that’s so to say a pathway towards the centre, the centre of your brain, of your mind, spirituality, your beliefs, whatever. That you experience that going from outside now to the centre here. And what you find here is so to say a body/mind connection. I mean of course what we need first of all we need a body. That’s a body mandala here, this square. You have here the speech mandala. You need speech in order to express the thoughts. You need think mandala which makes the connections. And finally you arrive at the wisdom mandala and after all in the centre enlightenment. So these are the different coordinates here going from outside to inside. So you see there is a lot contained in this graphical description of reality. And in the centre we find Kalachakra, that’s the main deity of this particular mandala, and his companion here in a union. He represents a male element. Kalachraka and he is so to say the real represent, the wheel of time, the ever going wheel of time, the treadmill you are sitting in. And then his companion, his companion Vishvamata, and she is the all-mother. She is so to say the static element and he’s the dynamic element and they belong together. Anyway, you can go further to look at more detail. And you see then there are mandalas within the mandala. There are smaller mandalas with 30 deities here contained by... A goat and a dog here carried this mandala. So it’s an incredible complexity within this. And something like a fractal ordering. You can go deeper, deeper inside. You always discover a new world. And that makes it so fascinating to look at these paintings in detail. It’s something like a babushka principle. Smaller, smaller, smaller babies and you still discover a new one when you open the last one. This is a painting of the 8th Dalai Lama on the moment of his enthronement 1762. You see him here. You see his birth place over here. That’s where he was born. So his life history so to say is encoded in this painting. You see here the guests coming to this ceremony of his enthronement. You see Mongols here, you see Chinese here, you see Indians. It’s very fascinating to look at these paintings. And they are so rich. You see here another dimension, the dimension of our ever going on life, namely rebirth. You know the Buddhist believe in rebirth and the Yamantaka, he is the conqueror of death. So he is responsible for this bridge going into the next life. And he’s a very strong personality, has his 1,000 arms here carrying symbols here. He has his 8, 9 heads. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. And he represents Manjusri. And Manjusri is the deity of wisdom. So wisdom and strength belong together. And I mean in this way he’s a very nice symbol for a scientist. I mean a scientist who should also have this combination of wisdom, Manjusri, and strength to overcome all the difficulties of the experiments and so on. That’s a deity which I like a lot. Ok let’s look at another painting. That was done actually in this monastery here in Derge. You have here Lhasa, that’s Tibet here in between. And we have a monk coming from Ngor monastery to Derge monastery and then this painting which I show you has been done. That’s here. And it’s a fascinating aspect of this painting that there is a painter’s workshop. And you see it actually here. I will blow it up in a second. You see it here. That’s a painter’s workshop. And let’s blow it further up. Here we have 2 rooms. We have the master’s room and the student’s room. And they’re working on paintings. Let’s blow it further up. We have here the master painter. That’s Zhu-chen, we know exactly who he is. And that was done 1770, something like that. He died in 1774. And he is making now the sketch of a Thangka on this canvas here. A monk is just stabilising the canvas. Another monk is making the ink for making his drawing, a little monk holding the ink pot for the great master. We have a teacher and a student watching what the great master is doing. And who is this down here. That’s a good for nothing, he is enjoying his life and looking out into the world and sees the birds flying by and so on. And you always find this kind of charming details in these kind of paintings. Ok, here we have the student rooms and here they put in the pigments into the different areas of the painting according to the inscriptions by the master painter. The master painter... These are the pigments which can be chemically analysed. We are just coming to it in a second. And these are the symbols which the master painter used to indicate what sort of pigment has to be put where in the painting. So if you use minium orange, that’s la, this Tibetan symbol here for yellow, ser. So these are the symbols which we should find underneath the paint layers if you can look through the paint layers. And you can do that by infrared photography. So we take a normal camera, you have a camera like that at home. You buy just an infrared filter, put it in front of it and then you have an infrared camera and you take a photo of your Thangka painting or whatever. Then you can distinguish between the IR-transparent pigments and the non-transparent pigments. And the transparent pigments they allow you to look through, to peek through the paint layer and perhaps to find the symbols. So this is the characteristics of this infrared filter, stop and pass. And here we have a painting. It’s a slightly different one. But when we look now with infrared at this particular painting, that’s what we see. And you see now here these symbols. And these symbols they are standing here for the various colours which the master painter indicated and the students had to fill in. So we can really get behind the scene and see how these paintings have been done. For example we look at this mandala painting from before. And if you look at it through an infrared filter, that’s what was done by the master painter and the colours have been put in by the students. Another beautiful painting. It’s an old one, from 1280. And if we look at this painting here by an infrared filter, that’s what we see. That’s the normal display. That’s an infrared display and you see for example we have here black, black hair and we have these black Makara. But if you look at the infrared, then it’s black in the infrared, the hair. But these Makara here are bright. So there are different pigments. And we can analyse these pigments now in this way. We find here Azurite, the blue. We find Malachite, the green. We find Indigo which is the transparent blue, here and there and here as well. So in this way we can do a preliminary pigment analysis just by a filter. But the best way is to do Raman spectroscopy. And that’s what I am doing now. I have in my home in Winterthur at the side of the lake I have a Raman spectrometer in the basement. I am so to say married to my charming lady and I’m married also to the Raman spectrometer. And both are charming, both cause problems from time to time. But otherwise it’s an ideal combination I think. Anyway, Raman is a very simple technique. And you have a painting like that and you irradiate here with a laser beam. And then you get stray light out. And this stray light has now different colours, namely the basic laser frequency is modified by the vibrations of the molecules in the layer. So these are reflections of the pigments. And you can analyse the pigments by analysing here if these spectra is on the left or the right hand side. And you see here Raman spectra characterising the different blues. And I don’t have to go into the details but you see the various blues have completely different spectra and it’s immediately clear what sort of a blue you have in front of you. That’s my basement here. That’s where I spend my night hours here. And actually the painting which you saw before is now shown here. You can look through the glass here with the microscope, Raman microscope, and determine the pigments. And what we find for example in that particular painting, we see 2 different, completely different pigments for some Makara which was bright and the hair which was dark in the infrared display. And you see they are completely different spectra. So in this way you can identify these pigments now really completely. And it’s clear then what sort of pigments are involved. I am coming to a final example. And this is coming from this very charming, beautiful monastery here, Drigung monastery. It’s not too far from Lhasa, east of Lhasa. That’s the typical way of building monasteries growing onto the hill. You see it here from a different side. And in this monastery this painting has been done. And this is in our house now. It’s a very beautiful painting here with these 4 monks here and some smaller personalities here. It’s all very easy to understand. Namely what we have here, that’s a founder of the monastery, founder of Drigung monastery. And these 2 were his masters. And this here is the master of the masters. So it’s what they call a lineage, a lineage showing the dependency from earlier generations. And we have them here. We have... It starts with Adibuddha number 1. And then we have 2 Indian saints here, Tilopa and Naropa. We have then a Tibetan who took the information into Tibet, Atisa, number 4. We have the translator, Marpa who translated from the Sanskrit into the Tibetan. So all that you can learn from these paintings and it’s all logically arranged and if you can read this notation you get a lot of inside information. And finally we come here to Jigten Gonpo, that’s number 10 and he is the founder of the monastery. That’s so to say his dependency from the Buddha, Adibuddha Vajradhara, number 1. Anyway, you see these very beautiful faces of this. They are really very charming in these paintings. You see them here again and of course we wanted to know how old is this painting. And for this you can do carbon-14 dating. You know it has been discussed before this morning. So carbon 14 is created by radioactive, by cosmic protons coming onto the material and then generating carbon-14 from nitrogen-14 here, that’s the last step. And then, from then on it starts to decay. It’s a radioactive material, carbon 14. And from the decay rate or the decay efficiency you can determine the age of the material. And the half life time of carbon 14, it has already been said today, is 5,730 years. And this can be determined for example at the ETH in Zurich. You have here an accelerator mass spectrometer and by that you determine here this decay curves. And when you measure a certain intensity, you can go into here and determine the age of the material. And you find here that this painting comes from 1229 plus or minus 61 years. So you have a physical method to determine age. And then you can look at the pigments. I have the blue pigment here and you find this is indigo. The green pigment is actually a mixture of yellow and blue. Orpiment is yellow, indigo is the blue component giving the green. We have the yellow which is orpiment. We have cinnabar and orpiment mixed. You can get all these different pigments. And this can give you information from where possibly this painting is coming from. Because what you find when you look at this set of pigments here, these are not typical Tibetan pigments. These are Nepalese pigments. So most likely it was a Nepalese painter who went to Tibet and made this painting in Tibet. And if you compare now with a Nepalese painting, you find here exactly the same pigment. It’s a beautiful painting. It’s hung in our house. And when I have male visitors in our house I tell them: “Be careful, that’s a dangerous lady.” And whenever you get enchanted by a lady, first look at her backside. And then I turn the painting around. And you see Agni here and Agni is the deity of fire. So he will burn you to death when you come too near to this lady. So ok, expand your horizon, science and passion that’s what I wanted to tell you. And I’d just like very briefly to go through a set of slides here that others had similar experiences, you know Einstein with his beloved violin. You know Murray Gell-Mann is the famous physicist, a bird watcher. Except that he’s watching, looking in the wrong direction. The bird is sitting on his head. Or Richard Feynman drumming, drumming, drumming, drumming. Or Djerassi, a famous chemist who invented the pill, is a writer. Or Manfred Eigen, a chemist and pianist playing Mozart concertos. Or Ruzicka, he’s a collector at ETH. He’s dead by now. Or Roald Hoffmann, he’s a stage manager. He organises now these events at the Cornelia Street Café which you should visit whenever you go to New York. And then we have Leonardo Da Vinci, engineer, scientist and artist. He’s really a centipede, he has at least a 1,000 different passions. He combines so to say everything in his personality. So I mean what you find here also is that curiosity and creativity are essentially the common denominator of sciences and art. They belong together. And those who retain their childlike curiosity and creativity become either scientists or in the best case artists. So keep your eyes open. Discover the world, it’s beautiful and there is so much to be discovered. And with that I’d like to close my lecture. Applause.

Liebe Freunde, nachdem wir jetzt zweieinhalb Tage lang äußerst anregende Vorträge mit einer extrem großen Bandbreite gehört haben, zögere ich ein bisschen, Ihnen die erste Folie zu zeigen. Sie trägt den Titel: „Den Horizont erweitern.“ Müssen wir nicht eher unseren Blick stärker lenken, anstatt ihn noch mehr schweifen zu lassen und den Blickwinkel zu erweitern? Wir haben erfahren, dass selbst die theoretische Physik Teil der Chemie ist. Wir haben erfahren, dass auch die klinische Medizin Teil der Chemie ist. Jenseits der Chemie gibt es also nichts. Auf der nächsten Folie lesen wir, was Georg Christoph Lichtenberg vor dreihundert Jahren gesagt hat: Man muss also in der Tat seinen Horizont erweitern und über den Tellerrand der Chemie hinausblicken, sonst versteht man auch die Chemie nicht. Wir brauchen also noch etwas dazu. Wir brauchen dazu die Leidenschaft. Wir brauchen Leidenschaft als Ergänzung unserer Profession. Nur mit dieser Ergänzung wird unser Leben komplett. Ich hoffe, Sie sind nicht in diesem Hamsterrad gefangen. Sie werden Herrn Nobel niemals nahekommen, wenn Sie darin gefangen sind. Sie müssen irgendwie da herauskommen. Das sollte aber nicht die einzige Frage sein, die Sie sich täglich nach dem Aufwachen stellen: Dieses Hamsterrad, das Sie hier sehen, ist eine selbstzerstörerische, sinnlose Beschäftigung. Eine übermäßige bzw. von Konkurrenzkampf geprägte Arbeit, die wenig einbringt und zu nichts führt; hierauf hat schon (die englischsprachige) Wikipedia hingewiesen. Man sollte sich niemals zum Ziel setzen, einen Nobelpreis zu erhalten. Streichen Sie dieses Ziel, das sollte es in Ihrem Leben nicht geben. Es sollte eine unerwartete Überraschung in Ihre Leben bleiben. Es sollte einfach geschehen, wenn es geschehen muss. Denken Sie nicht immer nur an den Nobelpreis. Einstein hat einmal gesagt: „Wer blindlings der Masse nachläuft, kommt für gewöhnlich nicht weiter als die Masse. Wer allein unterwegs ist, wird sich wahrscheinlich an Orten wiederfinden, wo noch niemand gewesen ist.“ Sie müssen also Einzelgänger werden. Sie müssen diese Straße alleine gehen, Ihr Ziel finden und sich um den Rest nicht kümmern. Öffnen Sie Ihre Augen. Öffnen Sie Ihre Augen und nehmen Sie wahr, was um Sie herum ist. Dann können Sie sich inspirieren lassen. Inspiration kommt nicht aus dem Fachbereich; üblicherweise kommt sie von außen. Ich will Ihnen etwas über meinen Werdegang erzählen, wie mein Interesse an der Chemie geweckt wurde. Ich studierte an der ETH Zürich. Nachdem ich mein Studium beendet hatte, ging ich zu Professor Günthard und fragte ihn: Er machte sich daran, mich zu inspirieren; er flößte mir Campari und Cinzano ein. Als ich dann einen sitzen hatte, sagte er nur drei Buchstaben: Ich fragte ihn: „Wofür steht NMR?“ Er erklärte es mir in ganz einfachen Worten: Moleküle bestehen aus Atomen. Nehmen wir also ein Atom heraus. Wenn wir es aufblasen, finden wir im Zentrum des Atoms den Kern. Und das ist nicht einfach nur eine Kugel – diese Kugel hat magnetische Eigenschaften. Sie hat ein eingebautes magnetisches Moment und dreht sich um ihre eigene Achse. Das nennen wir den Kernspin.“ Jemand an der ETH hatte bereits herausgefunden, dass dieser Kern, wenn man ein Magnetfeld anlegt, mit der Frequenz Omega proportional zur Stärke des Magnetfelds präzediert. Es handelte sich um Edward Purcell in Boston und Felix Bloch an der ETH Zürich, der im selben Institut wie ich studiert hatte. Wie auch immer – Professor Günthard sagte: „Beschränken Sie sich nicht auf die Theorie, führen Sie immer Experimente durch. Kombinieren Sie Experimente mit der Theorie; nur dann macht man Erfindungen.“ Das ist es, was er durch diesen Tanz zum Ausdruck bringen wollte. Nehmen Sie zum Beispiel ein Alkoholmolekül. Hier stößt man auf drei verschiedene Wasserstoffe: die Methylgruppe, die Methylengruppe, den OH-Wasserstoff. Sie weisen unterschiedliche Magnetfelder auf, weshalb sie mit unterschiedlichen Geschwindigkeiten präzedieren. Anhand dieser Geschwindigkeiten kann man das lokale Feld im Inneren des Moleküls messen. Auf diese Weise lässt sich das Molekül charakterisieren. Und der Professor sage: „Das könnte für die Chemie interessant sein.“ So bauten wir zusammen mit meinem Doktorvater Hans Primas ein NMR-Spektrometer. Wir bauten dieses nette kleine Instrument und erlebten eine herbe Enttäuschung. Es dauerte viel zu lange, eines dieser blöden NMR-Spektren aufzunehmen. Man musste tagelang warten; üblicherweise hatte das Spektrometer während der Wartezeit einen Aussetzer, und man musste wieder von vorne anfangen. Ich war jedenfalls sehr enttäuscht. Ich dachte mir, ich sollte dieses Fachgebiet verlassen, etwas Anständiges tun. Also verließ ich die ETH, die ETH gefiel mir nicht. Ich mochte die Schweiz nicht. Ich ging nach Kalifornien, ins gelobte Land der Wissenschaft. Hier, so dachte ich, könnte ich etwas erreichen. Doch was musste ich erfahren? Bei Varian Associates lernte ich Weston Anderson kennen, der sich mit genau dem gleichen Problem herumschlug wie ich selbst. Er sah aber nicht nur das Problem, er sah auch Lösungen. Und er sagte zu mir: „Wenn du es mit einem komplizierten Spektrum zu tun hast, versuche einfach, es parallel anzugehen. Baue einen Multikanal-Spektrometer. Ein Kanal, zweiter Kanal, dritter, vierter und so weiter. Und bringe alles zusammen. Auf diese Weise kannst du Zeit sparen. Du sorgst dafür, dass das Experiment viel empfindlicher wird. So macht man das.“ Er beschloss also, hier diesen rotierenden Zylinder zu bauen, den er seine Gebetsmühle nannte. Der Zylinder erzeugt all diese Frequenzen, die zur gleichzeitigen Anregung des ganzen Spektrums erforderlich sind. Er hat nie richtig funktioniert; heute können Sie ihn im Smithsonian Museum in Washington bewundern. Wenn Sie ihn sehen wollen. Er hat aber kein einziges NMR-Spektrum aufgenommen. Zum Glück hatte er in seiner Forschungsgruppe einen Schweizer Sklaven. Zusammen mit seinem Schweizer Sklaven machte er eine Erfindung. Dieser Schweizer Sklave... seine Leidenschaft gehörte zu jener Zeit der Musik. Und er wusste, dass in der Musik... mehrere Stimmen zusammen, eine Gruppe von Menschen, ein Orchester, das zusammenspielt, alles läuft gleichzeitig ab. Das ist von großer Bedeutung. Man hat also... es ist, als würde man mit dieser Stange auf die Tastatur drücken, alle Tasten gleichzeitig; das erzeugt Überlagerungen verschiedener Frequenzen. Und man muss musikalisch sein, sonst kann man das Spektrum nicht analysieren, die verschiedenen Spektrallinien oder die verschiedenen Klänge nicht erkennen. Achtundachtzig Tasten auf einmal. Das erfordert ein musikalisches Gehör, sonst kann man keine Analyse durchführen. Was macht man aber, wenn man nicht musikalisch ist? Man kauft einen Computer. Man kauft sich einen Computer, führt eine mathematische Fourier-Transformation durch – und schon hat man sein Spektrum. Das war die Geburtsstunde der Fourier-Transform-NMR. Starker Impuls, Zerfall, Fourier-Transformation; in null Komma nichts hat man das Spektrum. Das war die Lösung. Jetzt erhält man diese Spektren von Biomolekülen in vertretbarer Zeit, und die Methode wird praktisch anwendbar. Man kann hier dieses Protein identifizieren und so weiter. Zum ersten Mal begann ich, an die Wissenschaft zu glauben. Ich begann, an NMR zu glauben. Hier sehen Sie den Baum der Erkenntnis. Jetzt hat man endlich eine Leiter – eine Leiter, mit der man auf den Baum klettern und wohlbehalten wieder zurückkehren kann. Man klettert hinauf zur klinischen Medizin und hinab zur grundlegenden Physik. Alles wird miteinander verbunden. Die Wissenschaft zog mich in ihren Bann. Ich bekomme meinen Finger gar nicht mehr aus dem Mund dieses Schädels; er hält mich für immer gefangen. So fesselnd kann die Wissenschaft sein. Und ich hoffe, sie wird mit Ihnen das Gleiche anstellen. Das war das kleine Spielzeug, mit dem ich zu jener Zeit spielte. Doch dann kam Herbert Marcuse, sie wissen schon – er sprach über den eindimensionalen Menschen. Darüber, wie langweilig eindimensionale Menschen sein können. Hier schreibt er: und ihren Lieferanten von Masseninformationen systematisch gefördert. Ihr sprachliches Universum ist voller Hypothesen, die sich selbst bestätigen und die, unaufhörlich und monopolistisch wiederholt, zu hypnotischen Definitionen oder Diktaten werden.“ Nur ein Deutscher ist zu so einer schrecklichen Sprache fähig, vielleicht auch ein Schweizer. Es ist sehr schwer zu verstehen, was er meint. Doch wenn man lange genug darüber nachdenkt, wird es klar. Er hat etwas gegen den eindimensionalen Menschen. Meine Vision waren multidimensionale Ansätze. Hier sehen Sie es schon, wir müssen den Vorhang öffnen. Die multidimensionale Befreiung. Hier auf dem Bildschirm sehen Sie das multidimensionale Universum. Hier auch. Das ist die multidimensionale Spektroskopie, die von großem Wert sein kann. Wenn man anstelle eines eindimensionalen Spektrums ein zweidimensionales hat Sie enthalten Konnektivitätsinformationen in Molekülen. So können Sie herausfinden, was Kurt Wüthrich vorhin meinte, als er über die Bestimmung molekularer Strukturen sprach. Einem zweidimensionalen Spektrum wie diesem zum Beispiel kann man jetzt tatsächlich die Korrelationsinformationen entnehmen. Als er davon hörte, sagte er: „Hey, das nicht nur ein nettes Experiment, das ist in unseren Händen nützlich. Machen wir es also zusammen.“ Damit begann unsere Zusammenarbeit. Wir versuchten, Entfernungen durch den Raum zu messen, Entfernungen durch chemische Verbindungen. Und er bestimmte anhand dieser Daten die Strukturen. Man kann es in drei Dimensionen durchführen. Das dreidimensionale Spektrum erhält man zum Beispiel, indem man drei Impulse anlegt und mit drei Zeitvariablen eine dreidimensionale Fourier-Transformation durchführt, um ein dreidimensionales Spektrum wie dieses zu erhalten, das in meiner Gruppe vor einiger Zeit aufgenommen wurde. Doch die Impulsfolge wurde sehr kompliziert. Das sieht wie die Partitur für ein Symphonieorchester aus; alles spielt zusammen, und heraus kommt ein harmonisches Resultat. Das ist NMR in der Chemie. Doch die NMR ist auch in der klinischen Medizin von großer Bedeutung. Sie legen hier Ihren Freund in den Magneten und stellen fest, ob etwas darin ist. Und das sind wirklich aufschlussreiche Informationen, die durch MRT, die Magnetresonanztomographie, sichtbar werden. Das Experiment ist dem, was ich beschrieben habe, sehr ähnlich. Man legt entlang einer Achse einen Magnetfeldgradienten an; das ist sehr wichtig. Dann legt man ihn an einer zweiten Achse an. Man führt eine zweidimensionale Fourier-Transformation dieser Oszillationen in zwei Dimensionen durch und erhält eine zweidimensionale Abbildung. Hier ist zum Beispiel mein Gehirn. Leider ist das kein schönes Bild. Nicht schön deshalb, weil es Ihnen die unangenehme Wahrheit verrät. Hier sehen Sie nämlich mein Problem, meine Stenose. Der verantwortliche Arzt, der dieses Bild als Erster sah, sagte: Sie werden einen sehr leichten Tod haben. Die Welt wird vor Ihren Augen verschwinden, und dann werden Sie allein sein.“ Darauf warte ich immer noch. Es ist noch nicht passiert, aber es könnte jeden Moment passieren. Das ist also ein Problem. Niemand hat es gelöst; es ist immer noch da. Hier ist ein anderes Problem, das ich vor einiger Zeit hatte, im Jahr 2010. Sie sehen hier meine zwei Beine. MRT-Bilder, Angiographie; hier sehen Sie einen schönen Blutfluss von oben bis hinunter in den Fuß. Aber hier, das linke Bein, ist überhaupt nicht durchblutet. Der linke Fuß war ganz weiß, er schmerzte, ich konnte nicht mehr gehen. Und die Ärzte sagten: „Das ist nicht gut. Wir müssen einen kleinen Eingriff vornehmen. Wir müssen hier in Ihrem Bein eine Bypass-Operation durchführen und von hier bis dort unten eine neue Arterie legen.“ Und jetzt kann ich wieder tanzen. Alles funktioniert wunderbar. Beifall. Die MRT hat mich nicht geheilt; sie hat aber gezeigt, was zu tun war. Sie war also sehr nützlich. Und funktionelle Bildgebung – wenn Ihr Gehirn nicht mehr richtig funktioniert, ist es Zeit für die funktionelle Bildgebung. Sie können alles darstellen, was immer Sie wollen. Die NMR kennt keine Grenzen. Unbegrenzte Möglichkeiten also für die Konzeption neuer und nützlicher Experimente in vielen Dimensionen. Begeben wir uns wieder in die Vergangenheit. Im Jahr 1968 kehrten wir von Kalifornien in die Schweiz zurück. Zu jener Zeit hatten wir zwei amerikanische Mädchen in unserer Familie. Unsere Kinder sandten wir per Luftpost in die Schweiz; wir nahmen den Weg über Asien. Das war wirklich ein Erlebnis. Zum ersten Mal in Asien, und wir gingen... hier entdeckten wir noch mehr Dimensionen. Mehr Dimensionen... unser Leben wurde in der Tat multidimensional. Wir kamen nach Katmandu. Das war zu jener Zeit eine mittelalterliche Stadt, Menschen barfuß auf der Straße, an diesem Tag hat es geregnet. Hier der Markt von Katmandu. Auf diesem Markt wurden Bilder verkauft, diese Art von Bildern. Das ist ein tibetisches Gemälde. Die Flüchtlinge brachten diese Gemälde über den Himalaya nach Nepal. Um zu überleben, machten sie die Bilder zu Geld, und wir kauften genau dieses Gemälde. Es handelt sich um ein Thangka-Gemälde. Zu jener Zeit verstanden wir nichts davon, aber es war farbenprächtig und schön. Und Sie wissen ja: Farben, Pigmente, das sind Chemikalien. Die Chemie hat also auch in der Schönheit ihren Platz. Was Sie hier sehen, sind vier Arhats, Schüler Buddhas; sie verbreiten die Lehre in den verschiedenen Teilen von Indien. Dieser hier in Nordindien und in Pakistan, Islamabad, Punjab. Dieser im Gebiet von Mumbai. Der hier im Dreieck zwischen den Flüssen Yamuna und Ganges. Und der letzte ging auf die Insel. Das ist es, was hier dargestellt ist. Das haben wir auf diesem Thangka, das wir mit nach Hause nahmen, später herausgefunden. Jetzt gab es also zwei Dinge, die mich faszinierten: einerseits NMR, zweidimensionale Strukturen, die Herausbildung farbenprächtiger Strukturen; andererseits die farbenprächtige tibetische Kunst. Und wenn Sie sich mein Gehirn ansehen – das hier ist mein Kopf; er sieht ganz gut aus... hier sehen Sie den Frontallappen; das ist der Sitz der Wissenschaft. Und in dem Teil dort hinten, im Scheitellappen, dort finden Sie tibetische Kunst. Das sind die zwei Teile meines Gehirns. Natürlich überlappen sie sich; sie gehören zusammen. Und es gibt Kontakte. Ich werde Ihnen gleich etwas über diese Kontakte erzählen. Jetzt haben wir also dieses Gemälde; wir haben das ganze Gemälde mit nach Hause genommen. Wir waren stolze Besitzer eines wunderschönen tibetischen Gemäldes. Wir wurden zu Sammlern. Das ist nur das erste Gemälde unserer Sammlung. Mittlerweile beherbergt unser Zuhause Hunderte von Gemälden dieser Art. Wir leben jetzt sozusagen in einem tibetischen Tempel, in Winterthur. Das ist gar nicht weit von hier; wenn Sie den See überqueren, sind Sie schon fast da. Wie auch immer – dieses Gemälde entfachte nicht nur die Faszination für tibetische Kunst. Es weckte auch mein Interesse an der Kulturgeschichte Zentralasiens. Die ist sehr kompliziert, aber auch äußerst faszinierend. Ich lernte Einiges über die Maltechnik, außerdem über Konservierung und Restauration, um meine Bilder in gutem Zustand zu erhalten. Als Grundlagenwissen musste ich mir etwas buddhistische Philosophie aneignen. Und schließlich wollten wir den Tibetern etwas zurückgeben. Wir riefen in Südindien eine Kursreihe ins Leben; dort unterrichten wir tibetische Mönche in westlicher Wissenschaft. Der Austausch fließt jetzt in beide Richtungen: Spiritualität von Osten nach Westen und Wissenschaft von Westen nach Osten. Ich interessierte mich mehr und mehr für die Einzelheiten tibetischer Geschichte und Kunst. Wie Sie hier sehen, entwickelten sich im Verlauf der tibetischen Kunstgeschichte diese verschiedenen Schulen, buddhistische Schulen, die hier farblich gekennzeichnet sind. Ich gehe jetzt nicht auf die Einzelheiten ein, doch aus diesen verschiedenen Schulen stammen die Gemälde. Ich zeige Ihnen jetzt ein paar Gemälde. Wenn wir uns das ein bisschen näher ansehen, sehen wir... erfahren wir Multidimensionalität auf eine andere Art, auf tibetische Art. Hier haben wir zum Beispiel ein Mandala-Gemälde von 1580; es hängt in unserem Haus am anderen Ufer des Sees. Das ist ein schönes Bild. Aber es weist Strukturen auf. Hier zeigt es Strukturen. Es ist wie ein Quasikristall – man kann hineinsehen und viele Entdeckungen machen. Hier sehen Sie zum Beispiel diese farblichen Kennzeichnungen. Wir haben das rote Viertel und das gelbe Viertel; das weiße und das blaue. Sehen Sie – das ist das blaue, das ist das weiße, hier das gelbe und dort das rote. Und es gibt ein grünes Zentrum. Das sind die fünf Dimensionen des tibetischen Denkens. Sie haben fünf räumliche Dimensionen, und das Zentrum führt sozusagen in den Himmel. Wenn wir in diesem Gemälde von außen nach innen gehen, finden wir verschiedene Dimensionen vor. Es handelt sich sozusagen um einen Pfad zum Zentrum, zum Zentrum des Gehirns, des Geistes, der Spiritualität, des Glaubens, was auch immer. Das erlebt man, wenn man von außen ins Zentrum vordringt. Was man hier findet, ist gewissermaßen eine Körper-Seele-Verbindung. Natürlich brauchen wir alle zuerst einmal einen Körper. Das hier ist ein Körper-Mandala, dieses Quadrat. Hier haben wir das Sprach-Mandala; man benötigt Sprache, um seine Gedanken ausdrücken zu können. Man braucht ein Gedanken-Mandala, das die Verbindungen herstellt. Schließlich erreichen Sie das Weisheits-Mandala, und zum Schluss, im Zentrum, die Erleuchtung. Das sind, von außen nach innen, die verschiedenen Koordinaten. Sie sehen also, diese grafische Darstellung der Realität hat viel zu bieten. Im Zentrum stoßen wir auf Kalachakra, die Hauptgottheit dieses Mandalas, und auf seine Gefährtin. Sie bilden eine Einheit. Er repräsentiert das männliche Element, Kalachakra; er repräsentiert gewissermaßen das Rad der Zeit, das sich unermüdlich drehende Rad der Zeit, das Hamsterrad, in dem man sich befindet. Seine Gefährtin Vishvamata ist die Allmutter. Sie ist sozusagen das statische Element. Er ist das dynamische Element, und sie gehören zusammen. Man kann sich das noch genauer ansehen; dann sieht man Mandalas im Mandala. Hier gibt es kleinere Mandalas mit dreißig Gottheiten... diese Mandalas werden von einer Ziege und von einem Hund getragen. Die Komplexität in diesem Gemälde ist unglaublich. So etwas wie eine fraktale Anordnung. Man noch tiefer gehen, tiefer ins Innere vordringen. Stets entdeckt man eine neue Welt. Das macht es so faszinierend, sich diese Gemälde genau anzusehen. Es ähnelt dem Babuschka-Prinzip – immer kleinere und kleinere und kleinere Babys, und wenn man das letzte öffnet, findet man wieder ein neues. Dieses Gemälde stellt den achten Dalai Lama im Augenblick seiner Inthronisierung im Jahr 1762 dar. Sie sehen ihn hier. Dort können Sie seinen Geburtsort sehen; hier wurde er geboren. Seine Lebensgeschichte ist also gewissermaßen in diesem Gemälde verschlüsselt. Hier sind die Gäste, die zur Feier seiner Inthronisierung kommen. Dort sehen Sie Mongolen, hier sind Chinesen, Sie sehen Sie Inder. Es ist wirklich faszinierend, sich diese Gemälde anzusehen. Sie sind äußerst reichhaltig. Hier sehen Sie eine andere Dimension, die Dimension Ihres immer weitergehenden Lebens, nämlich der Wiedergeburt. Wie Sie wissen, glauben die Buddhisten an die Wiedergeburt und an den Yamantaka, das ist der Bezwinger des Todes. Er ist zuständig für die Brücke, die ins nächste Leben führt. Und er ist eine sehr starke Persönlichkeit, er hat tausend Arme, in denen er Symbole trägt. Er hat acht... neun Köpfe – eins, zwei, drei, vier, fünf, sechs, sieben, acht neun. Acht dieser Köpfe sind furchteinflößend. Nur einer ist friedfertig, nämlich dieser dort oben. Er repräsentiert Manjusri. Manjusri ist die Gottheit der Weisheit. Weisheit und Stärke gehören also zusammen. So gesehen, ist er ein sehr schönes Symbol für einen Wissenschaftler, wie ich finde. Ich meine – auch ein Wissenschaftler sollte über diese Kombination aus Weisheit, Manjusri, und Stärke verfügen, um all die Mühsal der Experimente zu überwinden. Das ist eine Gottheit, die mir sehr gut gefällt. Sehen wir uns noch ein Bild an. Es ist in diesem Kloster entstanden, in Derge. Hier sehen Sie Lhasa, das dazwischen ist Tibet. Ein Mönch kommt vom Ngor-Kloster ins Derge-Kloster, und dann entstand dieses Gemälde, das ich Ihnen zeige. Das ist hier. Ein faszinierender Aspekt dieses Gemäldes besteht darin, dass es eine Malerwerkstatt zeigt. Sie können sie hier sehen; ich werde sie gleich vergrößern. Hier sehen Sie sie. Das ist eine Malerwerkstatt. Vergrößern wir es noch stärker. Hier haben wir zwei Räume. Wir haben den Raum der Meister und den Raum der Schüler. Sie arbeiten an Gemälden. Vergrößern wir es noch stärker. Das ist der Meistermaler. Es handelt sich um Zhu-chen, wir wissen genau, wer er ist. Das Gemälde entstand 1770, ungefähr um diese Zeit. Er starb 1774. Hier erstellt er gerade auf dieser Leinwand die Umrisszeichnung eines Thangkas. Ein Mönch hält die Leinwand fest. Ein anderer Mönch macht die Tinte für die Zeichnung, ein kleiner Mönch hält das Tintenfass für den großen Meister. Wir sehen einen Lehrer und einen Schüler, sie beobachten, was der Meister tut. Und wer ist das da unten? Das ist ein Taugenichts; er genießt sein Leben, sieht in die Welt hinaus, sieht die Vögel vorbeifliegen, und so weiter. In Gemälden dieser Art findet man immer diese bezaubernden Details. Nun gut. Hier haben wir den Raum der Schüler; sie tragen die Pigmente nach den Beschriftungen des Meistermalers in den verschiedenen Bereichen des Gemäldes auf. Der Meistermaler... Das sind die Pigmente, die sich chemisch analysieren lassen. Dazu kommen wir gleich. Das sind die Symbole, anhand derer der Meistermaler anzeigte, welche Art von Pigmenten an welcher Stelle des Gemäldes aufzutragen ist. Für Minium-orange steht das tibetanische Symbol „la“, für gelb das Symbol „ser.“ Das sind die Symbole, die unter den Farbschichten zu finden sein sollten, wenn man durch die Farbschichten hindurchsehen kann. Und das gelingt mit Infrarotfotografie. Man nimmt eine normale Kamera; eine Kamera wie die hier hat man zu Hause. Man kauft einen Infrarotfilter, setzt ihn vor das Objektiv, und schon hat man eine Infrarotkamera, mit der man das Thangka-Gemäldes oder was auch immer fotografieren kann. Man unterscheidet IR-transparente Pigmenten und intransparente Pigmente. Die transparenten Pigmente erlauben uns, durch die Farbschicht zu spähen und vielleicht die Symbole zu finden. Das ist die Eigenschaft des Infrarotfilters: blockieren und durchlassen. Hier haben wir ein Gemälde, ein anderes. Wenn wir dieses bestimmte Gemälde mit Infrarot betrachten, dann sehen wir das. Und jetzt sind hier diese Symbole erkennbar. Diese Symbole stehen für die verschiedenen Farben. Der Meistermaler hat sie vorgezeichnet und die Schüler hatten sie aufzutragen. Wir können also tatsächlich einen Blick hinter die Kulissen werfen und sehen, wie diese Gemälde entstanden sind. Sehen wir uns zum Beispiel dieses Mandala-Gemälde von vorhin an. Wenn man es durch einen Infrarotfilter betrachtet – das hat der Meistermaler gemacht, und die Farben wurden von den Schülern aufgetragen. Noch ein wunderschönes Gemälde. Ein altes, von 1280. Wenn wir dieses Gemälde durch einen Infrarotfilter betrachten, dann sehen wir das. Das ist die normale Darstellung, das ist eine Infrarot-Darstellung. Zum Beispiel sehen Sie – hier haben wir Schwarz, schwarze Haare, und wir haben diese schwarzen Makaras. Doch wenn man das Infrarotbild ansieht, dann sind zwar die Haare immer noch schwarz, aber die Makaras sind hell. Es handelt sich also um verschiedene Pigmente. Wir können die Pigmente nun auf diese Weise analysieren. Hier finden wir Azurit, blau. Wir finden Malachit, grün. Wir finden Indigo, das transparente Blau, hier und dort, hier ebenfalls. Auf diese Weise können wir also allein anhand eines Filters eine vorläufige Pigmentanalyse durchführen. Doch am besten geht es mit Raman-Spektroskopie. Und das mache ich gerade. Im Keller meines Hauses in Winterthur, am Ufer des Sees, habe ich ein Raman-Spektrometer. Ich bin sozusagen mit meiner bezaubernden Frau und mit dem Raman-Spektrometer verheiratet. Beide sind bezaubernd, beide bereiten manchmal Probleme. Doch ansonsten ist es eine ideale Kombination, glaube ich. Wie auch immer, Raman ist eine sehr einfache Technik. Man hat ein Gemälde wie das und richtet hier einen Laserstrahl darauf. Dann wird Streulicht abgestrahlt. Dieses Streulicht hat verschiedene Farben; die Grundfrequenz des Lasers wird durch die Vibrationen der Moleküle in der Farbschicht modifiziert. Das sind Reflexionen der Pigmente. Man kann die Pigmente analysieren, indem man feststellt, ob sich diese Spektren auf der linken oder auf der rechten Seite befinden. Hier sehen Sie Raman-Spektren, die für die verschiedenen Blautöne stehen. Ich muss nicht im Einzelnen darauf eingehen, aber wie Sie sehen, haben die verschiedenen Blautöne ganz verschiedene Spektren. Es ist sofort klar, welche Art von Blau man vor sich hat. Das ist mein Keller; hier verbringe ich meine Nächte. Das Gemälde, das ich Ihnen vorhin gezeigt habe, ist jetzt hier zu sehen. Man kann mit dem Mikroskop, dem Raman-Mikroskop, durch das Glas sehen und die Pigmente bestimmen. Und was finden wir zum Beispiel in diesem bestimmten Gemälde? Wir sehen zwei verschiedene, zwei völlig verschiedene Pigmente – eines für einen Makara, der in der Infrarotdarstellung hell war, und eines für das Haar, das schwarz war. Wie Sie sehen, sind das zwei völlig verschiedene Spektren. Auf diese Weise kann man die Pigmente mittlerweile vollständig identifizieren. Dann weiß man, mit welcher Art von Pigmenten man es zu tun hat. Ich komme zu einem abschließenden Beispiel. Es ist aus diesem überaus bezaubernden, schönen Kloster, dem Drigung-Kloster. Es liegt nicht weit von Lhasa entfernt, östlich von Lhasa. Das ist die typische Art, Klöster zu bauen; es wächst den Hügel hinauf. Hier sehen Sie es von einer anderen Seite. Und in diesem Kloster entstand dieses Gemälde. Das ist jetzt auch in unserem Haus. Es ist ein sehr schönes Bild, mit diesen vier Mönchen und einigen kleiner dargestellten Persönlichkeiten. Es ist alles sehr leicht zu verstehen. Hier haben wir einen Gründer des Klosters, den Gründer des Drigung-Klosters. Diese beiden waren seine Meister. Und das da ist der Meister der Meister. Es ist das, was man eine Abstammungslinie nennt, eine Linie, mit der die Abstammung von früheren Generationen dargestellt wird. Hier haben wir sie. Wir haben... Es beginnt mit Adibuddha, Nummer 1. Dann haben wir hier zwei indische Heilige, Tilopa und Naropa. Dann haben wir einen Tibeter, der die Lehre nach Tibet brachte – Atisa, Nummer 4. Wir haben den Übersetzer Marpa, der aus dem Sanskrit ins Tibetische übersetzt hat. All das kann man aus diesen Bildern lesen. Es ist alles logisch angeordnet, und wenn man die Darstellungsart versteht, erhält man Zugang zu vielen verborgenen Informationen. Schließlich kommen wir zu Jigten Gonpo, das ist die Nummer 10, der Gründer des Klosters. Das ist sozusagen seine Abstammung von Buddha, Adibuddha Vajradhara, Nummer 1. Wie auch immer – sehen Sie nur, wie schön diese Gesichter sind. In diesen Gemälden sind sie wirklich sehr bezaubernd. Hier sehen Sie sie noch einmal, und natürlich wollten wir wissen, wie alt dieses Gemälde ist. Hierfür kann man auf die Kohlenstoff-14-Datierung zurückgreifen. Die wurde heute Vormittag schon erörtert, wie Sie wissen. Kohlenstoff-14 wird von radioaktiven, von kosmischen Protonen erzeugt, die auf das Material gelangen und Kohlenstoff-14 aus Stickstoff-14 erzeugen; das ist der letzte Schritt. Und dann, ab diesem Zeitpunkt, beginnt es zu zerfallen. Es handelt sich um radioaktives Material, Kohlenstoff-14. Anhand der Zerfallsrate bzw. der Zerfallseffizienz kann man das Alter des Materials bestimmen. Die Halbwertszeit von Kohlenstoff-14, das wurde heute schon erwähnt, beträgt 5.730 Jahre. Das lässt sich zum Beispiel an der ETH in Zürich bestimmen. Mit diesem Massenbeschleunigungsspektrometer hier bestimmt man die Zerfallskurven. Wenn man eine bestimmte Intensität misst, kann man hier nachsehen und das Alter des Materials bestimmen. Und man stellt fest, dass dieses Gemälde aus dem Jahr 1229 stammt, plus/minus 61 Jahre. Es gibt also eine physikalische Methode der Altersbestimmung. Dann kann man die Pigmente untersuchen. Hier habe ich ein blaues Pigment, und man stellt fest, dass es Indigo ist. Das grüne Pigment ist in Wirklichkeit eine Mischung aus gelb und blau. Auripigment ist die gelbe Komponente, Indigo die blaue, zusammen ergeben sie das grüne. Wir haben das gelbe, Auripigment. Wir haben eine Mischung aus Zinnoberrot und Auripigment. Man stößt auf all diese verschiedenen Pigmente. Daraus kann man schließen, woher dieses Gemälde möglicherweise kommt. Denn wenn man hier diese Gruppe von Pigmenten untersucht, dann stellt man fest, dass es keine typisch tibetischen Pigmente sind. Das sind nepalesische Pigmente. Höchstwahrscheinlich haben wir es mit eine nepalesischen Maler zu tun, der nach Tibet gegangen ist und in Tibet dieses Bild gemalt hat. Wenn man es jetzt mit einem nepalesischen Gemälde vergleicht, findet man hier genau die gleichen Pigmente. Das ist ein schönes Bild. Es hängt in unserem Haus. Wenn wir männliche Gäste im Haus haben, dann sage ich zu ihnen: „Vorsicht, das ist eine gefährliche Lady. Wenn Sie von einer Dame verzaubert werden, sehen Sie sich zuerst ihre Rückseite an.“ Dann drehe ich das Bild um, und zum Vorschein kommt Agni. Agni ist die Gottheit des Feuers. Er wird Sie verbrennen, wenn Sie seiner Dame zu nahe kommen. Nun gut. Erweitern Sie Ihren Horizont, Wissenschaft und Leidenschaft, das wollte ich Ihnen nahebringen. Ich will nur noch kurz ein paar Folien durchgehen und zeigen, dass andere ähnliche Erfahrungen machten. Einstein mit seiner geliebten Geige. Murray Gell-Mann, der berühmte Physiker, ist ein Vogelbeobachter. Nur dass er in die falsche Richtung schaut – der Vogel sitzt auf seinem Kopf. Oder Richard Feynman, er trommelt, trommelt, trommelt, trommelt. Oder Djerassi, ein berühmter Chemiker, der die Pille erfand; er ist Schriftsteller. Manfred Eigen, ein Chemiker und Pianist, spielt Mozart-Konzerte. Oder Ruzicka, er ist ein Sammler an der ETH; mittlerweile ist er verstorben. Roald Hoffmann ist Inspizient. Er organisiert jetzt diese Veranstaltungen im Cornelia Street Café, das Sie besuchen sollten, wenn sie einmal nach New York kommen. Und dann haben wir Leonardo da Vinci, Ingenieur, Wissenschaftler und Künstler. Er ist buchstäblich ein Tausendfüßler, mit mindestens tausend verschiedenen Leidenschaften. Er vereint sozusagen alles in seiner Person. Hieran können Sie erkennen, dass Neugier und Kreativität im Grunde den gemeinsamen Nenner von Wissenschaft und Kunst bilden. Sie gehören zusammen. Wer sich seine kindliche Neugier und seine Kreativität bewahrt, wird entweder Wissenschaftler oder – im besten Fall – Künstler. Halten Sie also Ihre Augen offen. Entdecken Sie die Welt, sie ist wunderschön und es gibt viel zu entdecken. Damit möchte ich meinen Vortrag schließen. Beifall.

Richard Ernst on the importance of curiosity and creativity as essential common denominator of sciences
(00:36:36 - 00:38:29)

 

 

Ben Feringa highlighting his love of ice-skating
(00:26:02 - 00:27:48)

 

Nobel Laureates come from very different backgrounds and have been awarded their prizes for a huge diversity of different discoveries. What unites them is a deep and abiding love of science and discovery, a love which is reflected in their advice to the young scientists: make sure that science is for you, then give everything to it, follow your curiosity and persist when times are hard.