Panel Discussion (2013) - Closing Session: Award Ceremony; Dialogue with Ramos-Horta and Stalsett; Panel Discussion 'Green Chemistry' (Host: Fred Guterl; participating panelists: Michael Braungart, Steven Chu, Mario Molina )

Panel Discussion (2013)

Closing Session: Award Ceremony; Dialogue with Ramos-Horta and Stalsett; Panel Discussion "Green Chemistry" (Host: Fred Guterl; participating panelists: Michael Braungart, Steven Chu, Mario Molina )

Panel Discussion (2013)

Closing Session: Award Ceremony; Dialogue with Ramos-Horta and Stalsett; Panel Discussion "Green Chemistry" (Host: Fred Guterl; participating panelists: Michael Braungart, Steven Chu, Mario Molina )

Abstract

Green chemistry can be interpreted in the narrow sense as approaches to finding new synthesizing processes by inventing and applying new catalysts that avoid toxic residues. For the purposes of this panel, however, we will take a broader view by focusing on the key role of chemistry in bringing about a sustainable world – one that can handle a population that is projected to approach 10 billion people by century’s end without depleting resources, spoiling habitat and catastrophically altering the oceans and atmosphere.To address this end, we have assembled a diverse panel of experts.
Our industrial processes have evolved by happenstance without much through to their aggregate impact on the planet – until recently. Michael Braungart, a pioneer in sustainable industry, will address the subject of how humans, by changing the fundamental processes by which we support our civilization, can have a positive net impact on world environments.
Michael Braungart is Academic Chair for Cradle-to-Cradle Innovations and Quality at Rotterdam School of Management at the University of Twente in the Netherlands and is founder of several commerical companies. A chemist by training, he is a pioneer in sustainability of industrial processes, and has said that humans, through sustainable practices and science, can have a net positive effect on the planet.
Steven Chu is professor of physics and molecular and cellular physiology at Stanford University. He was co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997 for his work on trapping atoms with laser light. During his term as Secretary of Energy in the administration of U.S. President Barack Obama, the Dept. launched several initiatives to spur the development of new technologies. As the nation’s most visible scientist, he provided an influential and rational voice on climate change and other pressing matters of scientific policy.
Mario Molina was co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995 for his work on elucidating the threat to the atmospheric ozone layer from chloroflourocarbon gases. He has been eloquent in speaking about the need for sustainable practices in cities to contain air pollution.
Host and interviewer: Fred Guterl is Executive Editor of Scientific American magazine, which for more than a hundred years has been a respected of science and technology for a wide international audience. He is former Deputy Editor of Newsweek International. He has received honors from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Overseas Press Club, and the American Association of Magazine Editors for his writing and editing. He is author of the highly acclaimed book The Fate of the Species: How the Human Race May Cause Its Own Extinction and How to Stop It (Bloomsbury). He makes frequent appearances as a public speaker and as a radio and television personality.

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