Avram Hershko (2007) - The ubiquitin system and its roles in the control of cell division

Avram Hershko (2007)

The ubiquitin system and its roles in the control of cell division

Avram Hershko (2007)

The ubiquitin system and its roles in the control of cell division

Abstract

The selective degradation of many short–lived proteins in eukaryotic cells is carried out by the ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by covalent ligation to ubiquitin, a highly conserved small protein. The ligation of ubiquitin to protein involves the successive action of three types of enzymes: the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and a ubiquitin-protein ligase, E3. The selectivity and the regulation of the degradation of a specific protein are usually determined by the properties of its specific ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzyme. We have been studying two ubiquitin ligase complexes that have important roles in different aspects of cell cycle regulation.

One is the cyclosome, or Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC/C), which acts on mitotic cyclins and some other regulators in exit from mitosis. The cyclosome is activated at the end of mitosis by phosphorylation, a process that allows its further activation by the ancillary protein Fizzy/Cdc20. A different complex, which belongs to the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box protein) family of ubiquitin ligases, is involved in the degradation of p27, a mammalian G1 Cdk inhibitor, following mitogenic stimulation. Its action is triggered by Cdk2-dependent phosphorylation of p27, as well as by the increase in levels of a specific F-box protein, Skp2 and of the auxiliary protein Cks1, that take place in the G1 to S-phase transition.

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