Karl Ziegler earns his Abitur at the Realgymnasium of Marburg. Due to his self-discipline he wins an award for most outstanding student in his final year of high school.

Karl Ziegler works as assistant of Karl von Auwers. During those years Ziegler dedicates himself to the study of Grignard reactions, the theory of valence and the study of organic radicals.

Karl Ziegler is President of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (GDCh, Society of German Chemists).

Karl Ziegler becomes Director of the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research (Max-Planck-Institut fur Kohlenforschung) formerly known as the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute for Coal Research (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut fur Kohlenforschung) in Mülheim an der Ruhr. Ziegler accepts this position provided that he will have complete freedom to choose and himplement his research topics and to keep patent rights and royalties on new inventions. On the 9th July 1969, he retires and becomes an Honorary Senator of the institute.

Karl Ziegler develops in 1953 a chemical process for production of polymerization. The following year, with the help of Guido Natta, he develops a series of catalysts (organometallic mixtures) for production of much stronger and more melting-resistant plastic. The Ziegler-Natta catalyst system can control how simple hydrocarbons are polymerized into large molecule substances, and has helped the development of modern moulded and industrial plastics.

Karl Ziegler is Visiting Lecturer at the University of Chicago.

Karl Ziegler works for ten years at University of Heidelberg, first as Privatdozent (lecturer) with Karl Freudenberg, and starting from 1928 as Außerordentlicher (Associate) Professor. It is in Heidelberg that he begins his research on carbon compounds and organometallic chemistry. He also works on the syntheses of multi-membered ring systems. In 1933, he publishes “Vielgliedrige Ringsysteme” which presents the fundamentals for the Ruggli-Ziegler dilution principle.

Karl Ziegler earns his Habilitation at the University of Marburg with a thesis entitled “Three Valent Carbon: Tetra-Aryl-Allyl-Radicals and Their Derivatives”.

Karl Ziegler is President of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Mineralölwissenschaft und Kohlechemie.

Even before earning his PhD Karl Ziegler begins working as assistant of Karl von Auwers. During those years Ziegler dedicates himself to the study of Grignard reactions, the theory of valence and the study of organic radicals.

Karl Ziegler is born in Helsa, Germany, to Carl August Ziegler, a Protestant minister, and Caroline Helene Louise, née Rall. Since an early age, Ziegler reveals an eagerness for science. After reading an introductory physics textbook, he begins performing experiments at home and studying extensively well beyond his school duties. ZIegler spends his early years in Helsa, and, after 1910, in Marburg.

Karl Ziegler earns a temporary lectureship with Julius von Braun at University of Frankfurt am Main.

Karl Ziegler marries Maria Kurtz of Marburg, with whom he has two children.

Karl Ziegler enters University of Marburg to study chemistry. Thanks to his self-taught chemical knowledge, Ziegler is allowed to forgo the first two semesters. He earns his Dr. phil. in 1920 studying under Karl von Auwers. His dissertation "Studies on semibenzole and related links", reaches three publications.

Karl Ziegler earns his Habilitation at the University of Marburg with a thesis entitled “Three Valent Carbon: Tetra-Aryl-Allyl-Radicals and Their Derivatives”.

Karl Ziegler receives one half of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry along with Giulio Natta "for their discoveries in the field of the chemistry and technology of high polymers".

Karl Ziegler becomes Professor and Director of the Chemisches Institut at the University of Halle/Saale. There, he studies alkali organic compounds, free radicals, polymerization mechanisms, and ring syntheses, which he successfully applies to some naturally occurring polycyclic substances.

Karl Ziegler dies in Mülheim at the age of 73.

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