Bert Sakmann becomes research assistant at Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of Neurobiology. Here he characterizes with Erwin Neher different subtypes of acetylcholine activated channels with biophysical methods.

After working in the Department of Biophysics under Bernard Katz at the University College London, Bert Sakmann completes his medical dissertation under the title 'Electrophysiology of Neural Lieght Adaption in the Cat Retina' in 1974 in the Medical Faculty of the Georg-August-University Göttingen

At the Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry Bert Sakmann becomes the director of the Cellphysiology department. In 1986 he is awarded theLouisa-Gross-Horwitz Prize for Biology or Biochemistry at the Columbia University together with Erwin Neher.

Bert Sakmann becomes Doctor of Medicine at the Medical Faculty of the University of Göttingen completing his medical dissertation, under the title “Electrophysiology of Neural Light Adaption in the Cat Retina”.

Bert Sakmann takes his state examination at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich.

Bert Sakmann grews up in Lindau, in totally nature and closely to the Lake Constance.

Bert Sakmann starts his internship at the University Hospital of Munich.

Bert Sakmann works in Otto Creutzfeldt's department on the electrophysiological basis of pattern recognition as a doctoral student.

Bert Sakmann continues his medical studies at the University of Berlin.

Bert Sakmann completes his Abitur at Wagenburg Gymnasium in Stuttgart. As a student, he enjoys physics, designing and building model motors and sailing ships as well as remote control aeroplanes. In the final year of school, he becomes fascinated by cybernetics and its possible application to biology.

Bert Sakmann is appointed director of the department for cellular physiology at the the Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg. He is appointed professor in theoretical medicine shortly afterwards.

Bert Sakmann enrols at the medical faculty of Tübingen University. During his first two years, he deepens his knowledge in biochemistry and physiology and he decides to conduct his doctoral thesis in electrophysiology.

Bert Sakmann is born in Stuttgart during the Second World War as the first of two children, to Bertold Sakmann, the director of a theatre and Annemarie Schaefer, a physiotherapist. He grows up in Lindau, on Lake Constance in a completely rural environment.

Unable to decision-making between physics and biology, he begins to study medicine in Tübingen. After attending universities in Freiburg, Berlin and Paris, he finishes his medical studies in Munich, because of love. At the beginning of his studies he learns much about biochemistry and physiology and decides to write his doctoral thesis about electrophysiology.

Bert Sakmann becomes Research Associate of the Membrane Biology Group at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry. He is made head of the membrane physiology unit in 1983, and in 1985 he becomes the Director of the Department for cellular physiology which mainly deals with the study of the molecular foundations of signal transmission in the central and peripheral nervous system.

In summer 2009 he becomes the scientific director of the Max-Planck-Institute for Biomedicine in Florida, United States. His research program is focusing on Bio-imaging of cerebral cortex structures.

Being an Emeritus Scientific Member of the Max-Planck-Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, Bert Sakmann leads an emeritus research group about the 'Funktionelle Anatomie einer kortikalen Säule' at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology. He's also leader of a research group at the Neuroscience Institute at Munich

Bert Sakmann is born in Stuttgart, Germany, as the first of two children to his parents Annemarie and Bertold Sakmann.

Bert Sakmann grows up in Lindau, on Lake Constance, in a completely rural environment. Here he attends elementary school.

Bert Sakmann continues his medical studies at the University of Freiburg.

Sakmann is research assistant at Max Planck Institute for Psychiatry, Department of Neurophysiology under Otto D. Creutzfeldt. He works on the electrophysiological basis of pattern recognition leading experimental work on the neurophysiological basis of light adaptation in the cat's visual system. He deepens cellular physiology to understand better the central nervous system joining Dieter Lux's laboratory and he learns from Erwin Neher how to voltage clamp synaptic currents in snail neurons.

Bert Sakmann continues his medical studies at the University of Paris.

Sakmann is British Council Fellow at the Bernard Katz's Department of Biophysics at University College. Bill Betz teaches him the basics of synaptic transmission and taking apart the neuromuscular synapse into its pre- and postsynaptic elements. Dale Purves explains him that the neuromuscular synapse is a good model for studying long-term changes in chemical and electrical excitability. Sakmann devotes himself to the molecular aspects of synaptic transmission, and to the development of synapses.

In 1987 he's appointed to the university professor of the medical school Göttingen University and is awarded the Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz-Price of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

In 1991 he's called to Heidelberg University as university professor of the Biology school.

In 1982 Bert Sakmann gets the Magnes Award of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. It is one of the most important awards for him, because Sakmann is the first German scientist to receive this prize.

In 1974 Bert Sakmann returns to Otto Creutzfeldt, who works at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen. Working in a membrane biology group since 1979, Sakmann is promoted in 1982 to the rank of a professor. He writes his dissertation about the observation of transmitter-receptor interaction on the molecular level.

Bert Sakmann is Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried. Starting from 2009 Bert Sakmann is also Scientific Director of the Max ‐ Planck ‐ Institute for Neuroscience in Jupiter, Florida.

After that Bert Sakmann becomes in 1988 the director of the Cellphysiology department at Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg.

Bert Sakmann receives half of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with Erwin Neher "for their discoveries concerning the function of single ion channels in cells". Their revolutionary work in the field of cell biology has provided a new approach for the study of disease mechanisms and the development of drug treatments.

After being awarded the Harvey Prize of the Technion in Haifa, Bert Sakmann receives the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine jointly with his colleague Erwin Neher for their discoveries concerning the function of single ion channels in cells and invention of the patch clamp. The award ceremony takes place in Stockholm, Sweden, like every year on the 10 December.

At school Bert Sakmann is only interested in physics. He designs and builds models of motors and sailing ships at home. In his final years of school he learns about cybernetics and tries to understand living organisms in engineering terms.

Bert Sakmann and Erwin Neher presume that ion channels in denervated muscle fibres might be a good choice to try out extracellular pipettes for the recording of elementary events. With the help of a group of collaborators they finally succeed in establishing patch clamp recording configurations which allows them to investigate almost any type of channel in almost every cell type.

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