Ferid Murad gains a Rector Scholarship at DePauw University, Indiana. In his first year, grades are not very good because of the distractions of being a pledge in the fraternity. In subsequent years, he develops more self confidence and better study habits. He lives with other fraternity brothers. They study together and compete for grades. He is the scholarship chairman of the fraternity andmajors in both biology and chemistry.

Ferid Murad leaves his tenure at Stanford in 1988 for a position at Abbott Laboratories. In four years of directing their pharmaceutical discovery and development programs, many novel drug targets are discovered there, and the company brings forward about 24 new compounds for clinical trials for various diseases. As Abbott’s senior scientist, Murad finds himself wedged between upper management, the marketing staff and the scientists, with great marketing pressures.

Ferid Murad is Professor (Adjunct) at Department Medical Biochemistry at Ohio State University.

Ferid Murad moves to California to work as Professor of the Depatments of Internal Medicine and Pharmacology at Stanford University. From 1984 to 1986, he is Associate Chairman. From 1986 to 1988, he is Acting Chairman of Medicine at Stanford and Acting Division Chief of the Division of Respiratory Medicine.

Ferid Murad receives the Nobel Prize along with Robert F. Furchgott and Louis J. Ignarro "for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system". He and the two co-recipients of the award have discovered how this colorless gas can be used to signal blood vessels to relax and widen, thus lowering blood pressure.

Ferid Murad is born in a small apartment in Whiting, Indiana, first of three children. His parents are Jabir Murat Ejupi, an Albanian immigrant from Macedonia, and Henrietta Bowman, an American Christian. The childhood poverty and the minimal education have a great influence on the career choices of Murad Ferid and his two brothers. One of them will become a dentist and the other a professor of anthropology.

Ferid Murad is called as Professor of the Department of Biochemistry and Molceular Biology at the George Washington University.

Ferid Murad is Professor (Adjunct) at the Department of Pharmacology of the Northwestern University, Medical School of Chicago.

In the spring break of 1957, he meets Carol Ann Leopold, his wife to be. At Christmas they are engaged and they marry within several weeks of graduation from DePauw.

He receives his undergraduate degree in chemistry from the pre-med program at DePauw University.

He goes to Stanford as Chief of Medicine of the Palo Alto Veterans Hospital.

Ferid Murad is Divisional Vice President, Pharmaceutical Discovery at Abbott Laboratories in Illinois (1988-90). From 1990 to 1992, he is Vice President of the Pharmaceutical Research & Development. He decides to go there primarily because of its president Jack Schuler. Ferid enjoys the access to all of Abbott's resources, instrumentation and research budget. They are able to discover many novel drug targets and they bring forward about 24 new compounds for clinical trials for various diseases.

Ferid Murad is born in Whiting, IN, USA.

After that, he goes to the Heart Institute of the NIH (National Institutes of Health) as a clinical associate in the Heart Institute.

Ferid Murad is called to develop a new Clinical Pharmacology Division in the Department of Medicine of University of Virginia. He accepts the offer from Ed Hook (the new chairman of medicine) and Joe Larner (the new chairman of pharmacology). He works from 1970 to 1975 as Associate Professor, and from 1975 to 1981 as Professor. From 1971 to 1981 he is Director of the Clinical Research Center, and from 1973 to 1981 he is also Director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology.

Ferid Murad gains his MD and pharmacology Ph.D. degrees from Case Western Reserve University in 1965. He has four daughters by that time.

Ferid Murad shares the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology / Medicine with Robert F. Furchgott and Louis J. Ignarro “for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system”. Murad's research has demonstrated that nitroglycerin and related drugs work by releasing nitric oxide into the body. Clinical trials with methods to regulate the formation of nitric oxide are examining their effectiveness to treat septic shock, inflammatory disorders, cancer, etc.

In 1997, Murad joins the University of Texas Medical School at Houston to create a new department of integrative biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

From 1967 to 1969, Murad Ferid works as Clinical Associate and Senior Assistant Surgeon at National Heart and Lung Institute, Molecular Disease Branch, Section on Metabolism, Bethesda, Maryland. From 1969 to 1970, he is Senior Staff Fellow. Here, he works with Dr. M. Vaughan. She is an excellent mentor and gives him considerable freedom to pursue a number of areas related to cyclic AMP and hormonal regulation.

Ferid Murad joins the University of Texas Medical School at Houston helding different positions. From 1997 to 2005, he works as Professor and Director at the Departments of Medicine and Integrative Biology and Pharmacology. He is also Director (1999-2007) and Director Emeritus (2007-2010) of the Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine for the Prevention of Human Disease. Finally, he holds the John S. Dunn Distinguished Chair in Physiology and Medicine.

In 1957, on spring break in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Murad Ferid meets Carol Ann Leopold, his wife to be. They are both at DePauw where she is an English and Spanish major planning to become a teacher, but he has not met her previously. After spring break they begin to date. At Christmas, they are engaged and marries on June 21, 1958.

The University of Virginia recruits him to develop a new Clinical Pharmacology Division in the Department of Medicine with an appointment as an Associate Professor in medicine and pharmacology. In Virginia, he starts conducting experiments on the biological effects of nitric oxide.

Ferid Murad is Professor (Adjunct) at Department Medical Biochemistry at Ohio State University.

From 1965 to 1966, Murad Ferid is Intern in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, with some of the worlds' leading scientists, teachers and clinicians. However, he misses the laboratory life and each spring he reads many of the abstracts of the Federation meeting (currently FASEB meeting) to see what he is missing in second messengers and hormone signaling. From 1966 to 1967, he becomes Resident in Internal Medicine.

Ferid Murad is Professor (Adjunct) at Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Northwestern University, Medical School of Chicago.

Ferid Murad is Chief of Medicine at Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center.

In 1977, Murad Ferid discovers that nitrates release nitric oxide, which relaxes smooth muscle cells, resulting in vasodilation.

Ferid Murad receives a MD and a pharmacology PhD at Western Reserve University. His mentors are Earl Sutherland, Jr., the chairman of the Pharmacology Department, and Theodore Rall. Before his arrival, they have discovered cyclic AMP as a "second messenger" of epinephrine - and glucagon-mediated effects on glycogenolysis in liver preparations. One of Ferid’s assignment is to show that the catecholamine effects on cyclic AMP formation are due to effects through the beta adrenergic receptor.

He decides to go to Massachusetts General Hospital for his internship and residency in medicine.

In 2011, he moves to the George Washington University as a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

He leaves Abbott in 1993 to found a new research-based biotech company, Molecular Geriatrics Corporation. After a partnership with a major pharmaceutical company, he rejoins academics.

Ferid Murad is founder, President and CEO of a new biotech company, Molecular Geriatrics Corporation. The aim is to create an intensive research-based biotech company. Unfortunately, his investment banker never raises the amounts of money promised. He travels around the world to find investors and partners to keep the company afloat. After a partnership with a major pharmaceutical company and some more financing as a private company, Ferid leaves to rejoin academics.

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