He attends junior high and high school in the town of Tenafly. He has some dedicated teachers; his calculus instructor opens his eyes to the beauty of mathematics. Thanks to him, he later chooses a math major in college.

Eric Stark Maskin is born on December 12, 1950 in the city of New York, but grows up in Alpine, New Jersey, a town with fewer than a thousand residents.

After that he returns to the US to teach at MIT, where he becomes Professor of Economics in 1981.

In 2000, he moves to the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Maskin works in many areas of economics, including game theory, social choice theory, political economy, the economies of intellectual property, and voting theory. He is a designer of the British government's carbon dioxide emissions auction. He is married to Dr. Gayle E. Sawtelle, who is lecturer in history at Princeton University. They live in a house that used to belong to Albert Einstein.

He receives his MA in 1974.

Maskin ends up doing a PhD in economics, though his degree is nominally in applied mathematics.

Eric Stark Maskin is born in New York.

Maskin visits England for a post-doctoral research fellowship at Jesus College in Cambridge University. That year is a marvelous experience for him − from Cambridge college life, to London theater, to touring around Europe. 

He then visits England as a Research Fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge.

In 1985 he moves to Harvard University. After fifteen years there, he feels the pressure of over-scheduling: too many courses, too many students, and too many committee meetings. So, when an offer arrives for a position in Princeton entailing very few duties, he takes it.

He grows up in Hudson River in Alpine, NJ, and attends high school in the town of Tenafly, three miles down the road. There he was lucky to have some dedicated teachers; he especially remembers his math teacher Francis Piersa, who opened his eyes to the beauty of mathematics.

Maskin attends Harvard University where he receives his BA in 1972 with a math major. He takes a course on "information economics", which covers Leonid Hurwicz's work in the nascent field of mechanism design. This work is a revelation to Maskin, since it includes pure mathematics and also addresses problems of real social importance.

His PhD degree is nominally in applied mathematics, but since the graduate program at Harvard is very flexible, he ends up doing an economics Ph.D.

He gains his MA in 1974. He attends a course on "information economics" taught by Kenneth Arrow, later his Ph.D. advisor. The course covers many topics from the frontier of economic theory, especially Leonid Hurwicz's work in the nascent field of mechanism design. This work has the precision and beauty of pure mathematics, and it also addresses problems of real social importance: For Maskin, this is an irresistible combination.

Eric Stark Maskin shares the 2007 economics prize with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson for laying the foundations of mechanism design theory. The theory allows economists to distinguish situations in which markets work well from those in which they do not. It takes into account information about individual preferences and available production technologies.

In 1985 he moves to Harvard University, where he is named Professor of Economics in 1997. But after fifteen years at Harvard, he feels the pressure of over-scheduling: too many courses, too many students, and too many committee meetings. So, when an offer arrives for a position at Princeton (entailing very few such duties), he takes it.

In 2000, he moves to the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, where he still works as a Professor of Social Science, and as a visiting lecturer in economics at Princeton University. Maskin works in many areas of economics, including game theory, social choice theory, political economy, the economies of intellectual property, and voting theory. He is married to Dr. Gayle E. Sawtelle, who is lecturer in history at Princeton University. They live in a house on Mercer Street that used to belong to Albert Einstein.

Maskin attends Harvard University, majoring in mathematics. He receives his BA in 1972.

Maskin returns to the US to teach at M.I.T.

Eric Stark Maskin shares the 2007 Nobel Prize in Economics with Leonid Hurwicz and Roger Myerson for laying the foundations of mechanism design theory. The theory allows economists to distinguish situations in which markets work well from those in which they do not. It takes into account information about individual preferences and available production technologies, which is usually dispersed among many parties who may use their private information for selfish ends.

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