After the discovery of the muon neutrino, Lederman promotes the construction of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois (Fermilab) founded in 1967. In 1977, Lederman leads a team of physicists to the discovery of the "upsilon particle", which is later understood as being composed of two elementary particles: the bottom quark and its antiparticle.

Leon Lederman attends the James Monroe High School in the South Bronx, New York City.

Leon Lederman, along with Melvin Schwartz and Jack Steinberger is awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics "for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino."

Leon Lederman becomes Director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia. In 1989 he becomes Director Emeritus. He is a very prominent early supporter of the Superconducting Super Collider project.

Leon Lederman teaches briefly at the University of Chicago.

During World War II, Leon Lederman spends 3 years in the U.S. Army where he becomes 2nd Lieutenant in the Signal Corps.

Leon Lederman begins his Ph.D. research working under Professor Eugene T. Booth with Columbia's Nevis synchro-cyclotron, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world at that time. His thesis assignment is to build a Wilson Cloud Chamber.

Leon Lederman enters the Graduate School of Physics at Columbia, chaired by I.I. Rabi. Here he earns his Master.

In 1956, working with a Columbia team at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Long Island, Leon Lederman discovers a new particle: the long-lived neutral K-meson.

Leon Lederman receives one third of the Nobel Prize in Physics along with Melvin Schwartz and Jack Steinberger "for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino".

Leon Lederman is appointed Pritzker Professor of Science at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Leon Lederman is appointed Frank E. Sulzberger Professor at the University of Chicago. During these years he pursues his increasing interest in the problems of science education in American schools.

Leon Lederman is born in New York City, the second son of Russian-Jewish immigrants Morris Lederman, a laundry man, and his wife, Minna Rosenberg.

Leon Lederman becomes the Director of the Fermilab. This laboratory acquires eminent position also thanks to the construction of the world's most powerful superconducting accelerator, the Tevatron. Lederman steps down in 1989 becoming Director Emeritus.

Lederman joins the faculty at Columbia and becomes Full Professor in 1958. Then he becomes Director of the Nevis Labs in 1961 until 1978. In 1956 he discovers the long-lived neutral K-meson which had been predicted in theory, and the following year he proves parity violation in pion and muon decays. In 1977, he discovers the upsilon particle, a previously unidentified particle nine times heavier than the proton, providing the first substantial evidence of the fifth or "bottom" quark.

After graduation, Leon Lederman continues his graduate studies at Columbia joining the recently built Synchrocyclotron at the NEVIS Laboratory, located in Irvington-on-the-Hudson, New York, under the direction of Professor Eugene T. Booth. His thesis assignment is to build a Wilson Cloud Chamber. Lederman collaborates with experts such as Bernardini and Tinlot and, later, Steinberger. Lederman earns his PhD in Physics in 1951.

Leon Lederman is born in New York City, as the second son of Russian-Jewish immigrants.

Leon Lederman spends three years in the army during World War II, rising to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant in the Signal Corps.

Since the early 1960s, Leon Lederman is interested in the properties of neutrinos. Along with Columbia researchers M. Schwartz and J. Steinberger, in 1962, Lederman makes the discovery of the muon neutrino at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven Laboratory. This discovery shows that exists a family of different neutrinos. The experiment uses the first neutrino beams paving the ways for the employment of these beams in further experiments at Brookhaven and other particle accelerators.

In 1958, Leon Lederman takes his first sabbatical at CERN where he organizes a research group to work at the "g-2" experiment. This CERN program will continue for about 19 years and involve many CERN physicists. It is the first of several collaborations of Lederman with CERN, which continue through the mid-1970s.

Lederman with M. Schwartz and J. Steinberger, develops at the Brookhaven National Laboratory the neutrino beam method for studying weak interactions and uses it to work on elementary particle physics, including a new type of neutrino that produces muons (mu mesons), therefore called muon neutrino. This leads to the recognition that there are “families” of subatomic particles, and this eventually results in the standard model, a scheme used to classify all known elementary particles.

Leon Lederman founds in 1986 the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, the first state-wide residence public school for gifted children and he becomes there Resident Scholar in 1998.

Leon Lederman receives his bachelor's degree in chemistry from the City College of New York. While majoring in chemistry, Lederman is influenced by future physicists such as Isaac Halpern and his high school friend, Martin J. Klein.

After his PhD, Leon Lederman is invited to continue the collaboration with the Columbia Synchrocyclotron, where he stays 28 years. In 1961, he becomes the Director of the Nevis Laboratory. In 1958, he is also promoted Eugene Higgins Professor at Columbia University.

Leon Lederman attends James Monroe High School.

After the war, Leon Lederman enters the Graduate School of Physics at Columbia University, New York City, chaired by I. I. Rabi, graduating in 1948.

Leon Lederman is currently Pritzker Professor of Science at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL.

Leon Lederman takes a sabbatical at CERN, where he organizes a group to do the "g-2" experiment. This CERN program would continue for about 19 years and involve many CERN physicists.

Leon Lederman enters the City College of New York, where he earns his BS in chemistry. Although he is chemistry major, he becomes fascinated with physics, because of the clarity of the logic and the unambiguous results from experimentation.

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