Harold Kroto transfers to Cec Costrain's laboratory at the National Research Council in order to work on microwave spectroscopy and on the rotational spectrum of NCN3.

Harold Kroto takes up a postdoctoral position at the National Research Council in Ottawa, to work with Don Ramsay. There, he meets his lifelong friends Reg Colin, Cec Costain, Fokke Creutzberg, Alec Douglas, Werner Goetz, Jon Hougen, Takeshi Oka, and Jim Watson. While at the NRC, Kroto discovers singlet-singlet electronic transition of the NCN radical and worked on pyridine.

Harold Kroto marries Margaret Henrietta Hunter, also a student at the University of Sheffield. They have two sons, both born in the 1960s, Stephen and David.

Harold Kroto becomes Visiting Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Harold Kroto becomes Visiting Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Harold Kroto receives the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley.

Harold Kroto returns to England to take up a postdoctoral position at the University of Sussex. He becomes Full Professor in 1975. Currently, he is Professor Emeritus of the same University.

Harold Kroto is made Knight Bachelor.

Harold Kroto obtains his doctoral degree from the University of Sheffield, under the supervision of Richard Dixon. Shifting from his early interest in organic chemistry, Kroto becomes interested in quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. His PhD thesis is on the Spectroscopy of Free Radicals produced by Flash Photolysis. At the same time, Kroto pursues his interests in sports, becoming the President of the Athletics Council of the Student Union (1963-1964).

Harold Kroto discovers the existence of the C60 species (buckminsterfullerene), during research conducted with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley.

Harold Kroto becomes Visiting Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Harold Kroto is born in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, to Edith and Heinz Krotoschiner, German refugees in England since 1937. Heinz Krotoschiner changes the family's surname of Polish background into the shorter "Kroto" in 1955.

Harold Kroto is offered a postdoctoral position at the University of Sussex, but decides to stay in the US, where he takes up postdoctoral work at the Bell Telephone Laboratories NJ, to work with Yoh Han Pao. There, he carries out studies of liquid phase interactions by laser Ramen spectroscopy.

Harold Kroto decides to study chemistry at the University of Sheffield, thanks to the advice of his sixth form teacher. During this time, he carries out his interests in arts by becoming editor of the student magazine "Arrows", to which he composes the covers and the advertising posters. He also plays tennis for the University tennis team.

Harold Kroto, by now five months old, moves to Bolton with his mother, as his father is interned in the Isle of Man. He lives in Bolton until the end of secondary education.

Harold Kroto serves as President of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Harold Kroto receives a honorary doctorate from the university of Tel Aviv.

Harold Kroto attends Bolton School. There, he enjoys art, geography, gymnastics and woodwork, with chemistry, mathematics and physics only becoming the core of his interests during the sixth form.

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