He works on his Ph.D. thesis at the Department of Chemistry at Harvard University and at the Department of Biological Chemistry at Harvard Medical School. He earns his Ph.D. in 1933. 

In 1967, he becomes Vice President of Burroughs Wellcome Co., a pharmaceutic company. By 1968, the company outgrows its facilities at Tuckahoe, and moves to North Carolina, selecting a site in the new Research Triangle Park. 

His career really begins in 1942 when he joins the Wellcome Research Laboratories in Tuckahoe, NY, as head of the Biochemistry Department. He is free to develop his own program of research. He begins working with Gertrude Elion in 1944. A line of inquiry the group begins in the 1940s yields new drug therapies for malaria, leukemia, gout, organ transplantation and bacterial infections. Their studies point the way for investigations that lead to antiviral drugs for herpes infections and AIDS.

The marriage and Hitching’s career begin in the middle of the Great Depression. The couple experience a nine-year period of impermanence, both financial and intellectual. Hitchings holds temporary appointments at the C.P. Huntington Laboratories of Harvard in cancer research, at The Harvard School of Public Health in nutrition research, and at Western Reserve University, Department of Medicine, in electrolyte research.

He becomes Scientist Emeritus in 1976. This allows more time for his own research and for travel. He also pursues philanthropic interests and volunteer civic activities.

Family wanderings put him in grade school in Berkeley and San Diego, CA, as well as in Bellingham and Seattle. The latter high school has a very heterogeneous population, so that he becomes comfortable dealing with people from different cultures. His father dies when he is twelve years old. The deep impression made by this event turns his thoughts toward medicine. 

Hitchings enters the University of Washington as a premedical student in 1923. The enthusiasm of faculty and students in the Chemistry Department infects him, so that he ends up with a chemistry major. He earns his Bachelor’s degree in 1927.

George Hitchings shares the 1988 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Sir James W. Black and Gertrude B. Elion “for their discoveries of important principles for drug treatment", Hitchings specifically for his work on chemotherapy.

In 1933 he marries Beverly Reimer. They raise two children. Beverley Reimer dies on collagen disease in 1985.

He stays on to earn a master's degree in 1928 with a thesis based on work carried out during the summer of 1927 at the Puget Sound Biological Station at Friday Harbor, Washington. 

George Herbert Hitchings is born in Hoquiam, WA. He enjoys a warm and loving home environment with a high standard of ethics and a thirst for knowledge. His parents are avid readers, especially his father, who would have been a scientist given the opportunity.

George Hitchings dies in Chapel Hill, NC.

George Herbert Hitchings is born in Hoquiam, WA. He enjoys a warm and loving home environment with a high standard of ethics and a thirst for knowledge. His parents are avid readers, especially his father, who would have been a scientist given the opportunity.

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