Sheldon Lee Glashow got married in Boston to the former Joan Alexander. They had four children

Sheldon Glashow is born in New York City the youngest of three children to Jewish immigrants from Russia, Lewis Gluchovsky, a plumber, and Bella (née Rubin). Since early age Glashow demonstrates interests for science.

Sheldon Glashow is Visiting Scientist at Niels Bohr Institute. There, he works on the hypothesis of the charm quark with J. Bjorken.

Sheldon Glashow visits CERN in Geneva.

Sheldon Lee Glashow becomes an Assistant Professor at Stanford University.

Sheldon Lee Glashow spends a semester at the University of Marseille as Visiting Professor.

Sheldon Glashow joins the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley as Associate Professor. There he goes on exploring the phenomenological successes of flavor SU(3) and attempts to understand the departures from exact symmetry as a consequence of spontaneous symmetry breakdown.

During his stay at the Niels Bohr Institute, Sheldon Lee Glashow completes his Nobel-winning model published in 1961 with the title “Partial-Symmetries of Weak Interactions.” Glashow hypothesizes that the symmetry structure underlying the electroweak unification is the SU(2)xU(1) gauge group, which requires four different force carriers: three heavy bosons mediating weak force and a massless boson (the photon) carrying the electromagnetic force.

From 1983 to 1984, Sheldon Lee Glashow is Distinguished University Professor and Visiting Professor of Physics at Boston University. There, Glashow is also Distinguished Visiting Scientist from 1984 to 2000.

In 1969, John Iliopoulos and Luciano Maiani come to Harvard as research fellows. Along with them, Sheldon Lee Glashow finds the arguments that predict the existence of charmed hadrons. The mechanism they proposes is now called the GIM mechanism.

Sheldon Glashow is Visiting Professor at University of Marseilles.

Sheldon Glashow works as Research Fellow at Caltech.

Sheldon Lee Glashow becomes Higgins Professor of Physics at Harvard University. In the same Institution, from 1987 to 1997 Glashow is also Mellon Professor of the Sciences.

From 1983 to 1984, Glashow is University Scholar at Texas A & M University. From 1983 to 1994, is Affiliate Senior Scientist.

Sheldon Lee Glashow shows an early inclination for natural sciences, which his parents encourage. Glashow attends the Bronx High School of Science, where he has as classmate Steven Weinberg, with whom he will share the Nobel Prize some thirty years later.

Sheldon Glashow is appointed professor of physics at Harvard University. In 1969, with John Iliopoulos and Luciano Maiani, Glashow develops a model (called GIm model) that predicted the existence of charmed hadrons and solves specific problems of weak interactions. In early 1974, he and his colleagues predict that charm would be discovered in neutrino physics or in e+ e- annihilation. He is named Higgins Professor of Physics in 1979, and becomes emeritus in 2000.

Sheldon Glashow receives one third of the Nobel Prize in Physics along with Abdus Salam and Steven Weinberg "for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current".

Sheldon Glashow enters the Bronx High School of Science, where he meets Steven Weinberg.

Sheldon Glashow is Visiting Professor at MIT.

Sheldon Glashow is Visitng Scientist at CERN.

Sheldon Glashow majors in physics at Cornell University.

In 1955, Sheldon L. Glashow begins his PhD studies under the supervision of Julian Schwinger at Harvard University. In 1957, Schwinger proposes that the unification of weak and electromagnetic interactions should be based on quantum field theory, especially on the non-Abelian Yang-Mills gauge theory. Schwinger advises Glashow to explore this hypothesis, which Glashow does in his dissertation “The Vector Meson in Elementary Particle Decays.” Glashow receives his PhD in January 1959.

Sheldon Lee Glashow receives his bachelor's degree from Cornell University. There, Glashow again joins a talented class, including the mathematician Daniel Kleitman and his old classmate Steven Weinberg, and many others who will become prominent scientists.

From 1980 to 1981, Sheldon Lee Glashow is Visiting Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sheldon Lee Glashow returns to Harvard and becomes Professor of Physics. In early 1974, he and his colleagues predict that charm would be discovered in neutrino physics or in e+ e- annihilation.

Sheldon Lee Glashow is Emeritus Higgins Professor of Physics at Harvard University.

Sheldon Lee Glashow receives the Nobel Prize in Physics, along with A. Salam and S. Weinberg “for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current.”

From 1980 to 1981, Sheldon Lee Glashow is Visiting Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1983 to 1984, Sheldon Lee Glashow is Distinguished University Professor and Visiting Professor of Physics at Boston University. There, Glashow is also Distinguished Visiting Scientist from 1984 to 2000.

Sheldon Lee Glashow is Associate Professor at the University of California at Berkeley. During this period, Glashow continues to explore the phenomenological successes of flavour SU(3) symmetry and tries to understand the departures from exact symmetry as a consequence of spontaneous symmetry breaking.

Sheldon Lee Glashow is Emeritus Higgins Professor of Physics at Harvard University.

During his stay in Copenaghen Glashow completes his Nobel-winning model published in 1961 with the title Partial-Symmetries of Weak Interactions. Glashow hypothesizes that the symmetry structure underlying the electroweak unification is larger than SU(2). The gauge symmetry group, Glashow proposes, is SU(2)xU(1), which requires four different force carriers. The particle now called Z. Glashow’s model provides a coherent picture of the electroweak unification in gauge field theory formalism.

Murray Gell-Mann brings Sheldon Lee Glashow to the California Institute of Technology as research fellow.

Sheldon Lee Glashow wins a NSF postdoctoral fellowship, and plans to work at the Lebedev Institute in Moscow with I. Tamm. Glashow spends the tenure of his fellowship at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, waiting for the Russian visa that never arrives.

From 1983 to 1984, Glashow is University Scholar at Texas A & M University. From 1983 to 1994, is Affiliate Senior Scientist.

After graduation, Sheldon Lee Glashow pursues his studies at Harvard University. There, Glashow obtains his Master’s degree in 1955.

Sheldon Glashow is appointed Assistant Professor at Stanford University.

Sheldon Glashow enters Harvard University, where he earns his Master's degree in 1955.

Sheldon Lee Glashow is born in Manhattan on December 5, 1932. He is the last of three children of Lewis Glashow and Bella née Rubin. Both his parents are Jewish immigrants that have left czarist Russia at the beginning of the 20th century.

Sheldon Glashow is a NSF Post-Doctoral Fellow. He plans to work at the Lebedev Institute in Moscow with I. Tamm, but instead he spends the tenure of his fellowship in Copenhagen at the Niels Bohr Institute and, partly, at CERN because the Russian Visa never comes.

Sheldon Glashow earns his PhD at Harvard University. During his PhD's years he develops his first ideas about the combination of “weak” and electromagnetic short-range forces. He prepares his thesis, entitled The Vector Meson in Elementary Particle Decays, under the guidance of Julian Schwinger.

1