Paul Berg is appointed Associate Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Stanford in 1959. In 1960 he becomes a full Professor of Biochemistry there. Berg researches mammalian cells, especially tumor viruses in mammalian cell culture, when he spends a year at the Salk Institute.

Paul Berg creates the first recombinant DNA molecules by using the new gene splicing techniques in 1972.

Paul Berg and Wolfgang Joklik discover a new enzyme that creates the nucleosides triphospates for nucleic acid assembly.

In 1969 Paul Berg gets the chair of the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Stanford.

Paul Berg switches his focus from classical biochemistry to molecular biology and so becomes Assistant to Associate Professor of Microbiology at the University of Washington in 1955.

Paul Berg is awarded the 1980 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for the research into nucleic acids. He shares the Prize with Walter Gilbert and Frederick Sanger.

Paul Berg identifies RNA, molecule coded in the messenger RNA (mRNA) in 1956.

From 1970 to 1990 Paul Berg is the Sam, Lulu and Jack Willson Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Stanford. Between 1973 and 1983 he´s also Non-Resident Fellow of the Salk Institute.

Paul Berg is Administrator at Rockefeller University from 1990 to 1992.

Paul Berg spends his second year as Postdoc at the Washington University School of Medicine with Arthur Kornberg.

Paul Berg becomes Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the American Cancer Society and studies for one year at the Institute of Cytophysiology in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Paul Berg is Cahill Professor in Cancer Research at the University of Stanford from 1994 to 2000.

Paul Berg discovers a new class of biological compounds - acyl adenylates.

Paul Berg becomes Administrator of the Beckman Center for Molecular-Genetic Medicine at the University of Stanford in 1985.

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