Werner Arber completes his doctoral studies at the University of Geneva.

Werner Arber receives the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, along with Hamilton Smith and Daniel Nathans, for the discovery of restriction endonucleases, which leads to the development of recombinant DNA technology.

Werner Arber, while still based at the University of Southern California, works at the laboratories of Gunther Stent (University of California, Berkeley), Joshua Lederberg and Ester Lederberg (Stanford University), and Salvador Luria (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

Werner Arber is elected Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Werner Arber marries Antonia Arber, with whom he has two daughters, Sylvia (1968) and Caroline (1974).

Werner Arber becomes a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

Werner Arber is appointed President of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences by Pope Benedict XVI. Arber is thus the first Protestant in the role.

Werner Arber studies chemistry and physics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, in Zürich.

Werner Arber is born in Gränichen, Aargau.

Werner Arber returns to the University of Geneva, where he works at the Physics Institute.

Werner Arber works in phage genetics at the University of Southern California, with Gio Bertani.

1953 Werner Arber works as an assistant for electron microscopy at the University of Geneva, where he also researches on bacteriophages and writes his dissertation on defective lambda prophage mutants.

Werner Arber becomes Extraordinary Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Geneva.

Werner Arber joins the University of Basel, where he works at the new Biozentrum, a new institute of interdisciplinary research.

Werner Arber becomes a member of the World Knowledge Dialogue Scientific Board.

Werner Arber works as Visiting Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology of the University of California, Berkeley.

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