Antony Hewish

Prof. Dr. Antony Hewish

Nationality
United Kingdom 
Institution
University of Cambridge 
Award
1974 
Discipline
Physics 
Co-recipients
Prof. Sir Martin Ryle 

Biography on the Official Web Site of the Nobel Prize

CURRICULUM VITAE

Born in Fowey (Cornwall) on May 11, 1924. Attended King's College in Taunton and went to the University of Cambridge to study physics. He resumed his studies after his war service at Farnborough. From 1951 to 1954 he worked as Research Fellow at Gonville and Caius College and until 1961 he held the post of Deputy Director of Studies in Physics. He was subsequently transferred to the University as Lecturer, in 1969 he was appointed Reader and two years later Professor of Radio Astronomy. His particular academic achievement is the discovery and explanation of the "pulsars". As early as the 1940ies he had already shown interest in the development of stars and cosmic objects characterised by extreme physical conditions. When Martin Ryle, whose group he had joined at that time, was given the newly created chair for Radioastronomy in Cambridge in 1966, he closely cooperated with him at the Mullard Observatory.

The twin interferometer for the observation of cosmic radio sources developed by the two scientists made it possible to use several separate antennas interconnected in phase instead of making observations by means of only a single parabolic antenna. This increased the precision of locating objects by more than two orders of magnitude. In 1967 Hewish and his colleague Jocelyn Bell for the first time detected a stellar radio source with a rapid, strictly periodical variability of intensity of scintillation. He demonstrated that these phenomena were emissions of a rapidly rotating "neutron star". In 1974 Ryle and Hewish were co-recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery of these astrophysically important objects described as the "final stages of a particular stellar development".

Cite


Specify width: px

Share

Antony Hewish

Cite


Specify width: px

Share